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Mozart, Beethoven, Schumann, Liszt, Brahms: Concertos / Klemperer


Release Date: 01/22/2013 
Label:  Warner Classics   Catalog #: 43482   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Wolfgang Amadeus MozartFranz LisztRobert SchumannLudwig van Beethoven,   ... 
Performer:  Alan CivilAnnie FischerDaniel BarenboimYehudi Menuhin,   ... 
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia OrchestraNew Philharmonia OrchestraJohn Alldis Choir,   ... 
Number of Discs: 6 
Recorded in: Stereo 
On Order: Usually ships in 1 to 2 weeks.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews

Klemperer was not a natural concerto accompanist, not just because he disliked compromising his view of the work, but also because his approach to conducting, especially in his later years, adopting strict tempos that often featured playing fast music slow and slow music fast (crudely put), was not calculated to foster a happy collaboration with a soloist. He did, however, make some great concerto recordings, most notably this Brahms concerto with David Oistrakh, which remains a classic. The Mozart horn concertos with Alan Civil, and the 25th Piano Concerto with Barenboim are also excellent.

The two concertos with Annie Fischer (Liszt No. 1 and Schumann) are interesting because anything Fischer did had a certain rock-solid
Read more integrity quite similar to Klemperer’s, but their relentless seriousness won’t be to all tastes. Consider the finale of the Schumann (first sound clip), with it’s deliberate ritornello, and you will know right away if the approach satisfies. The Beethoven concerto, with Menuhin, is generally very good, but still not one of the best–certainly not better than Menuhin’s recording with Furtwängler either for solo playing or conducting, particularly in the slow movement or finale.

That leaves us with the Beethoven piano concertos and Choral Fantasia with Barenboim. The two artists evidently enjoyed working with each other, but that doesn’t mean that their satisfaction inevitably leads to ours. As with Fischer, only more so, the performances alternate between Klemperer’s stern, sober accompaniments, and Barenboim’s no less sober but much more rhythmically fluid–even mannered–solo episodes. The finale of the Fourth Concerto (second sound clip) gives a good idea of what to expect.

Ultimately, these performances will likely appeal to Klemperer’s fans, as well as Fischer’s. The Brahms concerto has been available in any number of formats, by itself and in various Oistrakh collections. As a package, then, this is interesting rather than essential.

– ClassicsToday (David Hurwitz) Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Concerto for Horn no 1 in D major, K 412 (386b) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Alan Civil (French Horn)
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1791; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 05/1960 
2.
Concerto for Horn no 2 in E flat major, K 417 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Alan Civil (French Horn)
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1783; Vienna, Austria 
3.
Concerto for Horn no 3 in E flat major, K 447 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Alan Civil (French Horn)
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1784-1787; Vienna, Austria 
4.
Concerto for Horn no 4 in E flat major, K 495 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Alan Civil (French Horn)
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Vienna, Austria 
5.
Concerto for Piano no 1 in E flat major, S 124 by Franz Liszt
Performer:  Annie Fischer (Piano)
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1849/1856; Weimar, Germany 
6.
Concerto for Piano in A minor, Op. 54 by Robert Schumann
Performer:  Annie Fischer (Piano)
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1841-1845; Germany 
7.
Concerto for Piano no 1 in C major, Op. 15 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Daniel Barenboim (Piano)
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1795; Vienna, Austria 
8.
Concerto for Piano no 2 in B flat major, Op. 19 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Daniel Barenboim (Piano)
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1793/1798; Vienna, Austria 
9.
Concerto for Piano no 3 in C minor, Op. 37 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Daniel Barenboim (Piano)
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1800; Vienna, Austria 
10.
Concerto for Piano no 4 in G major, Op. 58 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Daniel Barenboim (Piano)
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1806; Vienna, Austria 
11.
Concerto for Piano no 5 in E flat major, Op. 73 "Emperor" by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Daniel Barenboim (Piano)
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1809; Vienna, Austria 
12.
Fantasia in C minor, Op. 80 "Choral Fantasy" by Ludwig van Beethoven
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  John Alldis Choir,  New Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1808; Vienna, Austria 
13.
Concerto for Violin in D major, Op. 61 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Yehudi Menuhin (Violin)
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1806; Vienna, Austria 
14.
Concerto for Violin in D major, Op. 77 by Johannes Brahms
Performer:  David Oistrakh (Violin)
Conductor:  Otto Klemperer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  French National Radio Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1878; Austria 
Date of Recording: 06/1960 
Venue:  Wagram Hall, Paris, France 
Length: 40 Minutes 52 Secs. 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  2 Customer Reviews )
 An evening with the Masters of music! February 25, 2013 By Samuel H. Feder (CINCINNATI, OH) See All My Reviews "We prefer to read or listen to music, so when an album of almost all of the major Masters comes along, it's great deal. I like Klemperer's conducting! These are all concertos, I might add very well done. So if you are a fan of Beethoven, Mozart, Liszt, Brahms or Schumann you will find this an excellent addition to your library of classical music." Report Abuse
 Otto never fails February 9, 2013 By K. BAKER (HEBER CITY, UT) See All My Reviews "Otto Klemperer was one of the great conductors of the 20th C. Its pretty much the case that anything Otto recorded is worth buying, especially at bargain box prices. The Beethoven concerti are excellent. So is everything else. The standout of the set is the Brahms violin concerto, but everything is well done. These recordings date back some 60 years for the oldest, and on a couple, their age shows. However, overall, they remind us that recording technology a half a century ago was far ahead of playback technology. On most, EMI's engineers produced sound quality that requires close attention to tell in from today's best (the biggest difference is in dynamic range). If you already appreciate Otto, you must get this. If you are new to Otto, unless you need recordings of these works, I'd suggest you start with the Otto's EMI set "Romantic Symphonies" which contains more impressive works. Whether you are an Otto fan or not, I would be remiss if I did not tell about the night in 1951 when Otto conducted the greatest performance of classical music since Haydn conducted the premier of "The Creation": GUSTAV MAHLER Symphony #2 with Jo Vincent, soprano; Kathleen Ferrier, contralto; Amsterdam Toonkunstkoor; Concertgebouworkest/Otto Klemperer; Live recording: Holland Festival, Amsterdam, July 12, 1951. The sonic quality sucks (my initial reaction to this CD was that it is the only CD I ever heard where I thought the LP recording was superior, but I haven't done a close study of the two yet. However, odds are you can't find the LP, so enjoy the CD), but if you can get by that, you will experience the greatest performance of any classical work of all time. The first movement of the symphony is a "Funeral March". A music critic who attended the concert wrote something like this in the next morning's newspaper. 'The foggy streets of Amsterdam were deserted last night when Amsterdam's citizens huddled in fear behind covered windows as the shrouded dead marched through the silent city, whose silence was broken only by the sounds of the great Mahler symphony'." Report Abuse
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