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Bach: Sonatas & Partitas for Solo Violin / Cotik


Release Date: 03/06/2020 
Label:  Centaur Records   Catalog #: 3755  
Composer:  Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Tomas Cotik
Number of Discs: 2 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

Argentine-born violinist Tomas Cotik has fully devoted himself to the study and interpretation of the Bach solo sonatas and partitas for violin. This is truly one of the greatest traversals of this transcendent music. Hailed by Michael Tilson Thomas as “An excellent violinist,” Tomas Cotik is internationally recognized as a soloist, chamber musician, and professor. A much sought-after recording artist, Dr. Cotik is currently involved in more than fourteen album recordings for Naxos and Centaur records, which have received over a hundred reviews and the highest praises from some of the best-known publications. Committed to passing on his passion for music, Dr. Cotik taught at the University of Miami, Florida International University, and Read more West Texas A&M University. He was appointed assistant professor of violin at Portland State University in 2016. Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Sonata for Violin solo no 1 in G minor, BWV 1001 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Tomas Cotik (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
2.
Partita for Violin solo no 1 in B minor, BWV 1002 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Tomas Cotik (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
3.
Sonata for Violin solo no 2 in A minor, BWV 1003 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Tomas Cotik (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
4.
Partita for Violin solo no 2 in D minor, BWV 1004 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Tomas Cotik (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
5.
Sonata for Violin solo no 3 in C major, BWV 1005 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Tomas Cotik (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
6.
Partita for Violin solo no 3 in E major, BWV 1006 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Tomas Cotik (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 Cotik’s Passionate Bach June 28, 2020 By Art Music Lady See All My Reviews "Argentinean violinist Tomas Cotik, who has actually made the violin sonatas of Mozart sound interesting (an almost superhuman feat, in my view) and breathed new life into the rather pedestrian music of Piazzola, is not just another violinist. He is a passionate musician who always seems to get under the skin of the music he performs, thus I was curious to hear his take on these sonatas and partitas. Cotik plays here with a modern violin but a Baroque bow, which he finds gives him better control and flexibility in this music, but he does overdo the straight tone a bit more than I like. Thus, insofar as the sheer sound of the instrument goes, I prefer Mark Kaplan to Cotik. One thing I noticed was that, either due to the bow, his use of straight tone, or both, Cotik’s playing has a bit more of a “rough-and-ready” sound to it than Kaplan. But then there is the underlying shape and form of each piece in these six works and the motor rhythms of the fast pieces, and here Cotik scores over Kaplan. Every movement of each sonata and partita is played faster by Cotik. Of course, speed in and of itself means nothing, but despite my wishing that he would have used a bit more vibrato in his slow movements, I did not feel that Cotik ignored the feeling in those slow movements, and the faster movements are simply terrific. Just listen, for instance, to the fourth-movement “Presto” of the first sonata for an example of what I mean. Kaplan plays it with good energy and a lot of feeling, but in Cotik’s skilled hands the notes simply jump off the bow. Moreover, in those in-between movements like the “Allamanda” in the first partita, Cotik’s rhythmic feeling—though quite clearly influenced by 20th-century music such as jazz (though he is decidedly not a jazz violinist)—makes for a big difference in the shaping and “bounce” in every phrase. To my ears, it is entirely unique in the presentation of this music, which is (a few popular movements aside) not everyone’s favorite Bach. Cotik even adds a slight hesitation in the spaces between notes here and there, as if to point up the slightly offbeat swagger of the music at this point. See my complete review at https://artmusiclounge.wordpress.com/2020/01/22/cotiks-passionate-bach/" Report Abuse
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