WGBH Radio WGBH Radio theclassicalstation.org
Welcome to ArkivMusic, the retail store for CLOFO!

Kapp, Ludig & Lemba: Orchestral Works / Jarvi, Estonian National Symphony


Release Date: 02/07/2020 
Label:  Chandos   Catalog #: 20150  
Composer:  Mihkel LüdigArtur LembaArtur Kapp
Performer:  Mihkel PollTriin Ruubel
Conductor:  Neeme Järvi
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Estonian National Symphony Orchestra
Number of Discs: 1 
In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews

In his latest recording for Chandos with his Estonian National Symphony Orchestra, Neeme Järvi explores pieces by three of Estonia’s earliest composers. The bulk of the works in the programme were composed in the first decade of the twentieth century and are all excellent representations of the birth of Estonian Music, as Estonia transitioned from a territory in the Russian Empire to independent Nation State. As was the norm at the end of the 19thcentury, these composers studied at the St. Petersburg Conservatoire, and Estonian symphonic music certainly has its roots in the Russian Nationalist style. Like so many other European Musics of this era, ethnic identity is emphasized by the inclusion of native folk tunes and the ‘Nordic’ Read more style of Greig and others is certainly an influence. Kapp’s 4thSymphony, however, was written after WWII, when Estonia and the other Baltic States were occupied by the Soviet Union. Dedicated to the 30thAnniversary of the All-Union Leninist Young Communist League (although probably not by choice) Kapp also subtitled it ‘Classical Symphony’ and its compact form and light textures deliver a more concentrated distillation of the Estonian style. Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Overture-Fantasy No. 2 by Mihkel Lüdig
Conductor:  Neeme Järvi
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Estonian National Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1945; Estonia 
2.
Concerto for Piano No. 1 in G major by Artur Lemba
Performer:  Mihkel Poll (Piano)
Conductor:  Neeme Järvi
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Estonian National Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1905; rev. 1910; Estonia 
3.
Jaaniöö (Midsummer Night) by Mihkel Lüdig
Conductor:  Neeme Järvi
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Estonian National Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1910; Estonia 
4.
Overture-Fantasy No. 1 by Mihkel Lüdig
Conductor:  Neeme Järvi
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Estonian National Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1906; Estonia 
5.
Viimne piht (The Last Confession) by Artur Kapp
Performer:  Triin Ruubel (Violin)
Conductor:  Neeme Järvi
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Estonian National Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1905; Estonia 
Notes: arr. Charles Coleman for violin and string orchestra 
6.
Symphony No. 4, "Noortesümfoonia" (Youth Symphony) by Artur Kapp
Conductor:  Neeme Järvi
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Estonian National Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1948; Estonia 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 Some special music from Estonia February 26, 2020 By Dean Frey See All My Reviews "I've loved the First Piano Concerto of Artur Lemba ever since I first heard it, on a fine Finlandia disc of Estonian concertos recorded late in the last century. It was so nice to see it on this new disc, again with the Estonian National Symphony Orchestra, but this time conducted by the esteemed conductor Neeme Järvi. Lemba was trained at the St. Petersburg Conservatory, and his music is solidly in the Russian Romantic tradition. His Concerto is from the same period as Rachmaninoff's 2nd and 3rd Piano Concertos, and it shares the lyrical feeling of those works, though one can hear as well the influence of Tchaikovsky's concerted music, not to mention Anton Rubinstein's once celebrated 4th Piano Concerto. Pianist Mihkel Poll provides all the virtuosity that Lemba puts into his music - he was as celebrated as a pianist as he was a composer - but the emphasis here is quite rightly on the music's lyrical content. Lemba really brings his own special sound to this music, as he does to the only other major piece of his I know, his Symphony in C Sharp Minor, also recorded by Järvi, and available on a special album from Chandos. Alas, that's largely it for this fine composer on disc. Though none of the other music on this album quite matches Lemba's piece, it's all quite marvellous. Three short orchestral works by Mihkel Lüdig are lovely, though they perhaps don't stick in the memory for very long. I was quite impressed with Artur Kapp's Viimne piht (The Last Confession), in an arrangement for violin and orchestra that features the violinist Triin Ruubel. Kapp's Symphony no. 4 comes from 1948; its dedication to the All-Union Leninist Young Communist League made me think it might have a Shostakovich sound, but this is music from an earlier time. One of its subtitles is "Classical Symphony", but even Prokofiev's 1st Symphony, from 1916, has a more advanced sound. Kapp's Symphony harks all the way back, I think, to Tchaikovsky's Mozart-inspired orchestral works. The great symphonies of Edward Tubin, memorably recorded by Järvi, show a much richer and vital strain of Estonian music than this light fare, as pleasant as it might be. As always, Neeme Järvi presents the music of his country in its best light. Authenticity is the keynote of this entire project. Chandos provides its usual full and warm sound, and excellent documentation of this unfamiliar music in a full multilingual liner booklet. Fine production values all around, from one of my favourite labels." Report Abuse
Review This Title