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For Glenn Gould / Goodyear


Release Date: 03/23/2018 
Label:  Sono Luminus   Catalog #: 92220  
Composer:  Orlando GibbonsJan Pieterszoon SweelinckJohann Sebastian BachJohannes Brahms,   ... 
Performer:  Stewart Goodyear
Number of Discs: 1 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

Note: To listen to excerpts from this release, please click here

This release comes from one of the hardest-working and most respected pianists in the world today- Stewart Goodyear. Every album from Goodyear is released to widespread critical acclaim, and this one is sure to be no different. Goodyear writes of this release: “It was the year Glenn Gould died when I first heard his legendary name. It was his Bach that introduced me to his playing. His sound struck me immediately… a sound that was compelling and uncompromising. It was not designed to speak words of mere prettiness, but of an individual truth… My decision to record
Read more Glenn Gould’s program came right after performing it in Montreal. While playing homage to one of the great Canadian legends, I was being transported to childhood memories of growing up in Toronto, Gould’s home town, studying at the Royal Conservatory, Gould’s home alma mater, and being an artist from Canada, Gould’s country.

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REVIEW:

He does have a good grasp on the way Gould played, capturing his crisp attack and emotional impact. Goodyear perfectly captures Gould’s unusual approach to Brahms, which was resolutely unsentimental. His performance of the Berg Sonata again captures Gould’s approach, albeit with a piano sound more resonant than the one Gould himself favored.

– The Arts Music Lounge (Lynn René Bayley) Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Lord Salisbury's pavan and galliard, for keyboard, MB18/19 by Orlando Gibbons
Performer:  Stewart Goodyear (Piano)
Period: Renaissance 
Written: 1612; England 
2.
Fantasia chromatica by Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck
Performer:  Stewart Goodyear (Piano)
Period: Renaissance 
Written: Netherlands (Holland 
3.
Three-Part Invention no 8 in F major, BWV 794 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Stewart Goodyear (Piano)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1723; Cöthen, Germany 
4.
Three-Part Invention no 7 in E minor, BWV 793 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Stewart Goodyear (Piano)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1723; Cöthen, Germany 
5.
Three-Part Invention no 4 in D minor, BWV 790 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Stewart Goodyear (Piano)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1723; Cöthen, Germany 
6.
Three-Part Invention no 14 in B flat major, BWV 800 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Stewart Goodyear (Piano)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1723; Cöthen, Germany 
7.
Three-Part Invention no 11 in G minor, BWV 797 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Stewart Goodyear (Piano)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1723; Cöthen, Germany 
8.
Partita for Keyboard no 5 in G major, BWV 829 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Stewart Goodyear (Piano)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1726-1731; Leipzig, Germany 
9.
Pieces (6) for Piano, Op. 118: no 2, Intermezzo in A major by Johannes Brahms
Performer:  Stewart Goodyear (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1892; Austria 
10.
Intermezzi (3) for Piano, Op. 117: no 3 in C sharp minor by Johannes Brahms
Performer:  Stewart Goodyear (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1892; Austria 
11.
Sonata for Piano, Op. 1 by Alban Berg
Performer:  Stewart Goodyear (Piano)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: ?1907-08; Austria 
12.
Goldberg Variations, BWV 988: Theme "Aria" by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Stewart Goodyear (Piano)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1741-1742; Nuremberg, Germany 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  2 Customer Reviews )
 Wonderful playing, lousy recording May 22, 2018 By Bruce L. (Baysville, Ontario) See All My Reviews "On all my stereo equipment this recording sounds odd, not crisp and clear, but slightly off or distorted. The playing is wonderful though. Did they record this with some sort of special surround sound that needs special equipment to decode? If so it sure doesn't come thru that well on straight stereo." Report Abuse
 With love from Stewart Goodyear March 25, 2018 By Dean Frey See All My Reviews "On January 11, 1955 Glenn Gould made his New York debut (what he called his "Debutown") at Town Hall, and on the following day he signed a recording contract with Columbia Records. His 27 years in the recording studio before his untimely death in 1982 made him a legend around the world, but here in Canada he is especially admired and loved. One of those hero-worshippers is Stewart Goodyear, born and raised in Toronto, and an alumnus, like Gould, of the Royal Conservatory of Music. Goodyear has recently been playing in concert many of the works from Gould's audacious programme in New York, and in his American debut earlier that year in Washington DC. Now we have this new Sono Luminus disc with many of those pieces: music by Gibbons, Bach (Sinfonias from the 3-Part Inventions and the 5th Partita) and Berg (his Piano Sonata op.1). He's also included two Brahms Intermezzi and to close, the ultimate Gould tribute, the Aria from The Goldberg Variations. I love Gould's Brahms; those who think of him as a capricious and detached artist should listen to his 1961 recording of 10 Intermezzi, which he referred to as "the sexiest interpretation of Brahms’s Intermezzi you’ve ever heard". He also said it was "perhaps the best piano playing I have done." Goodyear's own Intermezzo in A major, op. 118 no. 2 is as rapturous and full-blooded as Gould's, full of a deep understanding of Brahms and a fitting tribute to Gould in the bargain. It was surprising to notice how slow some of Glenn Gould's tempi were in his recordings of the early English masters. His 1971 recording of Orlando Gibbons' "Lord of Salisbury" Pavan and Galliard runs about the same length as Goodyear's in spite of the fact that the latter includes repeats that Gould doesn't. Goodyear's zippier version makes more musical sense, I think. Though I do love Gould's whole album A Consort of Musicke bye William Byrde and Orlando Gibbons, it's a bit out in left field even by the standards of its day, much less when looked at through any modern historically informed practice lens. Thank goodness we're finally beyond looking at Glenn Gould as the mere sum of his eccentricities. We have a much better idea of the whole person: his emotional responses to people as well as pianos, and the full measure of his mastery in so many dimensions of great artists like Bach and Brahms. It's this response to the complete artist that makes Goodyear's tribute so important; it's based on a study of the deep roots of Gould's art, and not the externalities. As well, it's obviously heartfelt. The best expression of this love is the last piece on the disc, the Aria from the Goldberg Variations. Goodyear's moving performance takes the middle ground between the bright, almost coltish first version Gould made at the beginning of his recording journey, and the solemn, heart-breaking one he made close to the end. What a marvellous way to celebrate our Glenn!" Report Abuse
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