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Paus: Works for Piano / Fernandez


Release Date: 12/01/2017 
Label:  Naxos   Catalog #: 8579019  
Composer:  Ramón Paús
Performer:  Eduardo Fernandez
Number of Discs: 1 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

The internationally admired Spanish composer Ramon Paus has written a sequence of music for piano that clearly reflects his wide-ranging and creative personality. Both Piano astrolabio and Piano al origen share passages that are poised between dream and wakefulness, with lush and transparent melodies evoking religious elements in music of transcendent expressivity. Inspired by Dreams, a film by Akira Kurosawa, Piano en Arles reflects a journey in search of light through shadow and doubt, the music brightened by Paus’ characteristically exciting absorption of jazz elements. The internationally admired Spanish composer Ramon Paus has written a sequence of music for piano that clearly reflects his wide-ranging and creative personality. Both Piano astrolabio and Piano al origen share passages that are poised between dream and wakefulness, with lush and transparent melodies evoking religious elements in music of transcendent expressivity. Inspired by Dreams, a film by Akira Kurosawa, Piano en Arles reflects a journey in search of light through shadow and doubt, the music brightened by Paus’ characteristically exciting absorption of jazz elements. Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Piano al origen by Ramón Paús
Performer:  Eduardo Fernandez (Piano)
Period: Contemporary 
Written: Spain 
2.
Piano en Arlés by Ramón Paús
Performer:  Eduardo Fernandez (Piano)
Period: Contemporary 
Written: Spain 
3.
Estudio para uracilo, un príncipe genómico by Ramón Paús
Performer:  Eduardo Fernandez (Piano)
Period: Contemporary 
Written: Spain 
4.
Piano astrolabio by Ramón Paús
Performer:  Eduardo Fernandez (Piano)
Period: Contemporary 
Written: Spain 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 Paus' Music Played Well by Fernandez December 23, 2017 By Art Music Lady See All My Reviews "My reaction to an earlier CD of Paus’ music, played by Maria Orejana on Sony Classical, was mixed: I liked some of the music but found too much of it “draggy” and monotonous. I originally posted a review of Orejana’s CD on my blog, but took it down because of my dissatisfaction. Listening to the present CD, I found that some of my dissatisfaction stemmed from Orejana and not necessarily from Paús. Eduardo Fernandez, whose superb recording of Albéniz’ Ibéria I included in my Penguin’s Girlfriend’s Guide and whose performances of the Scriabin Preludes I gave a good review to on this blog, plays this music with a far greater sense of cohesion and, better yet, a sense of phrasing that encompasses a good feeling for jazz swing. This is not to say that Paus’ music swings the way Kapustin’s does: his entire aesthetic is the exact opposite. Whereas Kapustin, using the great Oscar Peterson as a model, fills his scores with dazzling runs and complex polyrhythms, Paus takes a much more leisurely path. His music, as I noted when listening to Orejana’s recordings, is much closer aesthetically to that of such pianists as Bill Evans or Keith Jarrett. He uses space as a way of elongating phrase lengths and providing respites for the ear. Interestingly for an album issued in Naxos’ “Spanish Classics” series, the one thing this music does NOT sound like is Spanish—certainly not in the way that other Spanish and Mexican composers do. It sounds worldly in a universal sense, with the interpretation being in many respects more important than a mere “reading” of the scores. It also takes a pianist of Fernandez’ vision and sensitivities to pull these disparate elements together. And this he does, in each of the four long pieces on this album. Even when reviewing the Orejana recordings, I noted that the music sounded to me as if it were improvised into being at the keyboard, similar to Charles Mingus’ famous piano album. Of course, there is a danger in this approach, whether your name is Paus, Mingus, or anyone else who attempts such a thing, in that the wanderings of your mind in the throes of creation may not always produce a fully coherent piece of music. I also firmly believe that jazz musicians, not only Mingus but also Bill Evans, Lennie Tristano, Jaki Byard and Jack Reilly, have a distinct advantage over classical or classical-jazz composers because their minds are trained to a razor sharpness in just that discipline, the spontaneous creation of music that, if nothing else, needs to sound coherent and all of a piece, no matter how many side routes they take. Fernandez’ success in this music is very similar to the way he played the Scriabin Preludes, slow pieces based on Chopin’s aesthetic that require intense concentration in order to pull them together. Indeed, listening to a full album of Paus’ music is much akin to listening to a full program of Scriabin Preludes in that the general framework of each piece is the same, no matter how varied individual moments within each are. Listening to Fernandez play the faster, jazzier passages within these works would make you think he was a professional jazz pianist, so acute is his sense of rhythm and so fine is his “binding” of phrases. Play any of these pieces, but particularly the third (Estudio para uracilo, un príncipe genomico) for one of your jazz-loving friends without identifying the pianist, and I seriously doubt that they would suspect that they are listening to an outstanding classical artist. That’s how good his sense of jazz “time” is. In short, this is undoubtedly the best introduction to this composer. I can only hope that other listeners may have the patience and the interest to pick up on what he is doing here and try to understand how unique he is. --Lynn Rene Bayley, The Art Music Lounge" Report Abuse
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