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Bruckner: Symphony No 9 / Haitink

Bruckner / London Sym Orch / Haitink
Release Date: 02/11/2014 
Label:  Lso Live   Catalog #: 746   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Anton Bruckner
Conductor:  Bernard Haitink
Orchestra/Ensemble:  London Symphony Orchestra
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Multi 
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SuperAudio CD:  $14.99
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Notes and Editorial Reviews



"Haitink, as ever, maintains a magisterial grasp on the architectural span of Bruckner’s final “cathedral in sound”. In his 85th year, he is the doyen of the world’s great Brucknerians. His latest interpretation of the Ninth is not to be missed." - The Sunday Times (UK)

Bernard Haitink is internationally renowned for his interpretations of Bruckner and is widely recognized as the world’s leading Bruckner conductor.

Bruckner’s symphonies are often described as ‘Gothic cathedrals in sound,’ an apt description considering the composer’s devout faith and early vocation as an organist. He died before he could finish his Symphony No 9
Read more but within its three movements can be found some of his most complete music, imbued with a sense of deep solace and resolution.
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Works on This Recording

1.
Symphony no 9 in D minor, WAB 109 by Anton Bruckner
Conductor:  Bernard Haitink
Orchestra/Ensemble:  London Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1891-1896; Vienna, Austria 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  3 Customer Reviews )
 A Spiritual unfinished Ninth June 23, 2014 By owen ryan (lakewood, CA) See All My Reviews "What was to be Bruckner's Opus remained unfinished due to his death. Stephen Johnson in his CD booklet notes observes that ''the spiritual journey of the Ninth Symphony is a very dark one (agonized probing, nightmare visions). It is hard to resist the impression that thoughts of death left a deep imprint on the character of the symphony.'' This is the latest recording of the Ninth by Haitink which shows his ''evolving spaciousness, not just a broader view but also a deeper one. A gripping and magesterial reading.'' John Quinn, MusicWeb, Int. The final movement completed in outline form is lost but like Schubert's ''Unfinished'' Eighth, this unfinished work is quite whole and satisfactory as it is. Strongly recommended." Report Abuse
 I Like This  May 16, 2014 By W. Wilborn (Richwood, TX) See All My Reviews "I'm no expert, but I found the sound to be well recorded and clear, the music is accessible and entertaining. I have liked the 9th for many years. I like this CD." Report Abuse
 Sorry; he's recorded it too often and without  April 19, 2014 By William C S. (Thousand Oaks, CA) See All My Reviews "new insight. Bernard Haitink ties Eugene Ormandy and Herbert von Karajan for the rerecording of needless retraversals of the same repertory without significant gains in clarity of texture or perceptive thoughts on the musical subject. I think there are no fewer than 3 Bruckner 9ths from this source, all reasonably intelligent, literate readings, but none that is compelling, exciting or expressive of new or novel thinking. This performance is slower than the initial 1965 reading, not in significantly better sound than any of its predecessors. Haitink, as with almost everything he touches, fails brilliantly and consistently to put a personal stamp on interpretation. Other conductors who proffer authoritative performances such as Kleiber, Abbado and Dohnanyi, for example, are able to personalize their interpretations and yet they remain valid and worthy. Haitink's performances come across as the notes, without interpretation. Don't spend your $ here. Besides, LSO Records started as a budget label for $6-8 per disc. Now's a full-priced label. Why? Look to, of all people, Rattle's new BPO performance which is insightful and well recorded, Jochum (DG or EMI), Barenboim (DG or Teldec), Chailly, Wand in one of several iterations, Walter, even Bernstein for truly insightful interpretations, though in Bernstein's case, willful. At least you'll be moved and gratified instead of listening to this truly lobotomized traversal of the notes." Report Abuse
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