Customer Reviews for: Ries: Piano Concertos Vol 5 / Christopher Hinterhuber

6 Reviews in Total
5 Star: 5 Reviews
4 Star: 2 Reviews
3 Star: 0 Reviews
2 Star: 0 Reviews
1 Star: 0 Reviews

Average Review

4.5 Stars (6 Reviews)

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 Lesser known, but beautiful May 23, 2018
By gary  m. (milpitas, CA) -- See All My Reviews
This CD in a very rewarding experience.... Report Abuse

 Beautiful Music, Beautifully Played, Impeccably R May 4, 2013
By L. Majors (Bartlesville, OK) -- See All My Reviews
I was unfamiliar with Ries before buying this CD, but I became intrigued when I read that he studied with Beethoven. For Beethoven to have considered him worthy of his time and attention, to my mind, was a high recommendation of his musical ability, indeed. I am pleased to say that my intuition paid off, Ries, as demonstrated by this fine recording of his pisno concertos, is indeed, a wonderful composer. These concertos sparkle with creativity and verve. And while tipping his hat to his great teacher, they are in no way derivative of Beethoven's piano concertos in the least. Highly recommended. Report Abuse

 A Fitting Finale April 8, 2013
By Ralph Graves (Hood, VA) -- See All My Reviews
Naxos concludes their survey of Ferdinand Ries' works for piano and orchestra with this release. Ries was an interesting character. A talented pianist and composer, he moved to Vienna to study with Beethoven, and became his secretary. In time, Ries set out on his own to become a highly successful performer and composer. This installment presents Ries' first and last piano concertos. It also features one of the large-scale single-movement works he wrote to showcase his talents in concert. Piano Concerto No. 2 in E-flat, Op. 42 starts the program. Despite its number, this 1806 concerto was actually the first of the eight Ries composed. It has the bravera of Beethoven but tempered somewhat by simple triadic melodies that seem more akin to Mozart. This late Mozart/early Beethoven character is reinforced in the Larghetto and Rondo movements, which sound light, and lighthearted. The Introduction et Rondeau brilliant, Op. 144 is a big, sprawling work full of grand gestures. Finished in 1825, the music sounds more like Schubert than Beethoven. Especially in the slow and elegiac introduction, the piano part seems to presage to Chopin in its expressiveness and fluidity. Final work on the album is Ries' Piano Concerto in G minor, Op. 177. Finished 24 years after his first concerto, Ries displays an expected growth in his style. Ries' melodies sound more like Brahms than Mozart. The burliness of Beethoven is still there in the solo passages, but Mozartean elan has been replaced by more sophisticated harmonies and increased drama. The orchestration has also developed, with instruments being exploited more for their colors than just providing accompaniment. Judging by the piano part, Ries must have been a ferocious player. Although there are some real technical challenges here, Hinterhuber makes them sound simple, and even fun to play. And that just adds to the listener's enjoyment. This release brings a satisfying close to this traversal of Ferdinand Ries' most important compositions. Report Abuse

 Brilliant Series Conclusion March 1, 2013
By Henry S. (Springfield, VA) -- See All My Reviews
With this recording, Naxos concludes its excellent series surveying the works for piano and orchestra by Ferdinand Ries. Ries' piano concertos spring from the late Classical and early Romantic eras, and by any account are magnificent examples of the glorious music composed during those years. Strongly reminiscent of Beethoven's works for piano and orchestra, Ries nevertheless manages to convey freshness and imaginative scoring for soloist and orchestra throughout. It is hard to imagine how the team of soloist Christopher Hinterhuber, the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra,and conductor Uwe Grodd, could possibly be surpassed in the quality demonstrated on this disk. Naxos has done a real service to classical music fans with this truly remarkable Ries series, to which this disk provides a fitting capstone. Strong recommendations to this disk and all the others in Naxos' series. Report Abuse

 LESSER KNOWN MASTERPIECES January 4, 2013
By Laszlo Straka (Fontana, CA) -- See All My Reviews
RIES HAS BEEN VERY MUCH NEGLECTED AND HIS WORK OVERSHADOWED BY FAMOUS CONTEMPORARIES (NOTABLY BEETHOVEN). THE AUSTRIAN PIANIST CHRISTOPHER HINTERHUBER (SAY THAT THREE TIMES QUICKLY!) HAS ALMOST SINGLEHANDEDLY (WELL, USING BOTH SKILLFUL HANDS) REVIVED MOST OF RIES'S PIANO WORK, MUCH TO HIS CREDIT. THIS LATEST ADDITION TO THE OEUVRE IS MOST WELCOME -- BOTH THE FIRST AND THE LAST OF HIS PIANO CONCERTOS ARE FEATURED ON THIS CD. IF YOU ARE TIRED OF THE MORE POPULAR PIANO WORKS BY MOZART AND BEETHOVEN, TRY RIES (AND ALSO HUMMEL, ANOTHER AUSTRIAN COMPOSER FAVORED BY HINTERHUBER) -- YOU WILL LIKE THEM BOTH FOR SURE. Report Abuse

 Worthy Hands Complete the Series November 20, 2012
By D. Stewart (Flagstaff, AZ) -- See All My Reviews
I cannot remember so eagerly awaiting releases, such as this, since waiting for Rudolf Serkin releases in the 50-80's. This Vol 5 did not disappoint. It, like all the other Vols in this wonderful series, is just plain magnificent. All of Ries's piano and orchestral compositions are present within 5 Vols. Ries's music is a sheer delight with hints of Beethoven, Mendelssohn, and Chopin. The orchestral writing is both energetic and at times contemplative with much attention to the horns, woodwinds, and tympani. But it is the piano writing that captures most of the attention, and I cannot imagine a pianist that plays it any better, or with such feeling and devotion, than the pianist on this 5 Vol Series, Christopher Hinterhuber. Once you have heard Vol 1(2005) you will be hooked on the performances, recording, and music. One used to have to wait for future Vols with enthusiasm -- and at times impatience. Fortunately all 5 Vols are now ready for you to enjoy. Though different Orchestras are involved in Vols 1, 2, 3 and 4 all are sympathetically and energetically conducted by Uwe Grodd and magnificently recorded, with the piano in just the right balance. You can also clearly hear all of the orchestral parts, and Ries makes them worth the listen. The pianist is in an almost constant, and I am sure quite difficult, spotlight and given a workout, but Hinterhuber makes it all sound natural and easy. All involved in this series deserve a Grammy. Listen to these performances at any time, but if you are having a bad day any one of these Vols will quickly get you in a more receptive and pleasant mood. For starters and the curious, Vol 5(2012) contains the first published concerto and the last, which makes for an interesting comparison, but there is no doubt that these were all written by Ferdinand Ries. Hurry. You will not be disappointed. These 5 Vols are all instant 5 star winners Report Abuse

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