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Haydn: Symphonies Vol 10 / Hogwood, Academy Of Ancient Music


Release Date: 08/08/2000 
Label:  L'oiseau Lyre   Catalog #: 466941   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Christopher Hogwood
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy of Ancient Music
Number of Discs: 3 
Recorded in: Stereo 
Length: 2 Hours 50 Mins. 

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This CD is reissued by ArkivMusic.

Notes and Editorial Reviews

A successful and eventful Volume 10 in Hogwood’s stylishly performed survey of the complete Haydn symphonies.

One factor has remained consistent throughout this series. Hogwood has steadfastly refused to use a keyboard continuo. He has had his detractors, but James Webster (the annotator of the booklets) maintains that Haydn ‘almost certainly’ didn’t use such an instrument; and Franz Eibner believes that he didn’t want one for the post-1761 symphonies. Another factor has, however, not remained consistent, and that is Hogwood’s conducting, which has improved steadily. Examples in earlier volumes (this is No 10) show that he sometimes had difficulties in releasing the music from the constraints of bar lines. Phrases
Read more tended to sit mechanically alongside one another in a literal, four-square way that was reminiscent of the bad old days of autocratic ‘authenticity’. These limitations have virtually disappeared; only in the slow movement of No 73 is there a trace of erstwhile rigidity. And it is in the finale of this same symphony that the one disappointment also occurs. Hogwood chooses the right tempo but subdues the horns in the tuttis. Without their whooping exuberance, this movement doesn’t quite live up to the work’s title, La chasse.

It is a strange anomaly because elsewhere Hogwood is careful to ensure that all the winds are distinctively prominent (as they ought to be), though not at the expense of drowning the strings. The quality of sound is on the whole very good, too, showing a welcome return to standards that were once prevalent. Occasional suggestions of mildly cramped violins notwithstanding, the lapses of the previous volume – phase-shifts, scrawny tone and altering perspectives – are not heard here. The technical flaws of that set did not, however, obscure the beginnings of some interpretative flexibility that also spill over into these performances. While Hogwood continues to prefer rapid Menuets (which the metronome markings of Czerny and Hummel suggest were common), he now appears to believe, albeit guardedly, that a single tempo is not always right for the contrasting characteristics of the companion Trios. Easing the pulse for that of No 70 or speeding it up for that of No 71 – with significant gains to the decorative turns in the melodic line – shows a willingness to rethink matters. But similar variations in pace are not observed in every suitable instance, so perhaps Hogwood wishes to be cautiously selective.

Still, he remains remarkably adept at conveying the obsessive, nervous drive that Haydn wrote into numerous fast movements. Paradoxically, though, Hogwood ignores Webster’s contention that the opening Vivace con brio of No 70 should be ‘so fast as to be virtually one-in-a-bar’. Yet, he achieves brilliance even if it isn’t of the headlong variety. Indeed, the whole work is supremely interpreted, with brass and timpani shiningly present. At the other extreme is the extraordinarily profound Adagio cantabile of No 74 where for the first 20 bars, muted violins (called for in all but one second movement) have a sepulchral conversation with cellos across a wide gap. That’s Haydn too, dishing out his surprises. Hogwood doesn’t miss many of them.

-- Nalen Anthoni, Gramophone [11/2000]
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Works on This Recording

1. Symphony no 62 in D major, H 1 no 62 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Christopher Hogwood
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy of Ancient Music
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1781; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 09/1995 
Venue:  Henry Wood Hall, London, England 
Length: 24 Minutes 58 Secs. 
2. Symphony no 63 in C major, H 1 no 63 "La Roxelane" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Christopher Hogwood
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy of Ancient Music
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1781; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 09/1995 
Venue:  Henry Wood Hall, London, England 
Length: 22 Minutes 3 Secs. 
3. Symphony no 70 in D major, H 1 no 70 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Christopher Hogwood
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy of Ancient Music
Period: Classical 
Written: 1778-1779; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 09/1995 
Venue:  Walthamstow Hall, London, England 
Length: 19 Minutes 26 Secs. 
4. Symphony no 73 in D major, H 1 no 73 "La Chasse" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Christopher Hogwood
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy of Ancient Music
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1782; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 03/1995 
Venue:  Walthamstow Hall, London, England 
Length: 23 Minutes 47 Secs. 
5. Symphony no 75 in D major, H 1 no 75 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Christopher Hogwood
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy of Ancient Music
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1781; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 03/1995 
Venue:  Walthamstow Hall, London, England 
Length: 23 Minutes 42 Secs. 
6. Symphony no 71 in B flat major, H 1 no 71 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Christopher Hogwood
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy of Ancient Music
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1780; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 03/1995 
Venue:  Walthamstow Hall, London, England 
Length: 31 Minutes 51 Secs. 
7. Symphony no 74 in E flat major, H 1 no 74 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Christopher Hogwood
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy of Ancient Music
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1781; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 09/1995 
Venue:  Walthamstow Hall, London, England 
Length: 23 Minutes 55 Secs. 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 A WONDER January 28, 2012 By MARCO PENTEADO (SAO PAULO, SP) See All My Reviews "Wonderful, both the Haydn symphonies and Hogwood and the Academy of Ancient Music's performances in this album. A must to be listened." Report Abuse
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