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Bach Bachianas - Music By The Bach Family / Goebel, Musica Antiqua Koln [5-CD Collector's Edition]


Release Date: 10/16/2012 
Label:  Archiv Produktion (Dg)   Catalog #: 001725802   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Johann Christoph BachHeinrich BachJohann Michael BachGeorg Christoph Bach,   ... 
Performer:  Maria ZedeliusUlla GroenewoldPaul ElliottStephen Varcoe,   ... 
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua CologneRheinische Kantorei
Number of Discs: 5 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

Reviews of the original recordings that make up this set:

This is certainly amongst the most absorbingly interesting releases to have come my way: ''Music Of The Bach Family Before Johann Sebastian'', the very title beckons to the baroque-curious mind; and it will not be disappointed by the greater number of compositions in this collection. Four members of the Bach family are represented—Heinrich (1615-92), his two composer sons, Johann Christoph (1642-1703) and Johann Michael (1648-94), and Georg Christoph (1642-97), the son of Heinrich's brother Christoph. We cannot thank Johann Sebastian Bach enough for the music included here since it was he who initially collected it together. After his death this Altbachisches
Read more Archiv which included many more pieces besides, passed to his second son, Carl Philipp Emanuel. When he died, the Bach anthology was bought by a collector whence it passed, via Zelter, to the Berlin Singakademie. In 1935, Max Schneider published the vocal works of the collection— ''in the nick of time'', writes the author of an interesting accompanying essay, Andreas Holschneider, ''for the Berliner Singakademie's entire collection of manuscripts was burnt during the Second World War''.

This two-disc issue contains all the works for solo voices, choir and instrumental ensemble but not the choral motets which have generally been given more attention in the past. Heinrich Bach's vocal concerto, or cantata, Ich danke dir, Gott is the sole surviving vocal work by him. It's scored for two sopranos, alto, tenor and bass with five-part string ensemble and continuo. The stile concertato recalls Schutz, especially in the ripeno sections, but the instrumental writing and the important solo and ensemble vocal episodes have a distinctly forward-looking aspect. On the strength of this piece it's not surprising to learn that Heinrich's funeral oration described him as an experienced composer of chorales, motets, concertos (such as the present work), preludes and fugues.

The history of Georg Christoph Bach's little cantata, Siehe, wie fein und lieblich is delightful. In the year following his appointment as Cantor at Schweinfurt, his brothers Ambrosius and Johann Christoph (not the one represented in this anthology) paid him a visit to celebrate his birthday. Georg Christoph was so delighted by this gesture of family solidarity that he wrote his birthday cantata to the highly appropriate text of Psalm 133: ''Behold, how good and joyful a thing it is brethren to dwell together in unity''. Everything about the work conveys the harmonious spirit which existed among the three brothers. 'Three' plays a highly significant role throughout: three voices (two tenors and a bass), three bass viols and, admittedly a solo violin, an instrumental prelude containing three themes and so on. The music is full of interest with some dashing gestures and one cannot but feel sorrowful that this is the only piece by him to have survived.

Johann Michael Bach is represented by his five formally varied sacred concertos. All but one are scored for a five-strand string ensemble and prefaced by a short instrumental movement. The vocal requirements differ from cantata to cantata. Ach, bleib bei uns, Herr Jesu Christ is scored for four-part choir and begins with a darkly-coloured sinfonia containing brilliant episodes for the upper strings. Some of the images of the text are colourfully illustrated with affective dynamic shading in passages such as ''In these last sorrowful hours''. The cantata, Auf, lasst uns den Herren loben is scored for an alto voice with strings and continuo. Its opening sinfonia with recitative-like solo-violin writing is particularly arresting though the simplicity of the strophic setting, with its little instrumental echoes is appealing, too. The other cantatas, Es ist ein grosser Gewinn and the strophic Ach, wie sehnlich wart' ich der Zeit are for soprano voices with strings, whilst the fifth one, Liebster Jesu, hor mein Flehen, is a Lenten dialogue for five solo voices. The contrast between instrumental virtuosity and the gentle directness of much of the vocal writing is an engaging feature of this music; it avoids predictability and constantly surprises us with its wide, sometimes unexpected terms of reference.

The remaining compositions in this collection have left a deep impression upon me. Johann Christoph, younger brother of Johann Michael, expresses himself in musical language which ranges from profound melancholy to fierce spiritual affirmation. Johann Sebastian greatly admired his work as did Carl Philipp Emanuel. Some of the pieces here, such as the wedding cantata, Meine Freundin, du bist schon and the hauntingly beautiful lament, Ach, dass ich Wassers g'nug hatte, were already familiar to me but his setting of the cantata for the Feast of St Michael and All Angels, Es erhub sich ein Streit, though available through Karl Geiringer's anthology, ''Music of the Bach Family'', was, for me, a thrilling and unforgettable first performance. Johann Sebastian performed it, according to Philipp Emanuel, in Leipzig where everybody was astonished by its effect. It's lavishly scored for two five-part chorus, five soloists, four trumpets, drums, bassoon, strings and continuo. The piece offers the greatest contrast imaginable with the two poignant laments, Ach, dass ich Wassers g'nug hatte and Wie bist du denn, O Gott. The first, for alto voice with strings, contains a marked Purcellian flavour in its opening measures. The second, for bass with a similar string ensemble, is on a more ambitious scale, making considerable demands both upon singer and violinist. The cantata, Die Furcht des Herren, for a town council election, is scored for five soloists with four-part chorus and an orchestra of strings. Meine Freundin, du bist schon is an extended wedding cantata for four soloists, four-part choir, strings and continuo. The text is accompanied by an amusing and light-hearted commentary by Johann Ambrosius Bach, which is reproduced in full in the accompanying booklet.

The performances in the main are very strong, with outstanding contributions both from Reinhard Goebel as violin soloist and from Cologne Musica Antiqua. Anyone who has heard this group's recording of German chamber music before Bach (Archiv Produktion 2723 078, 10/81—nla) will readily understand my enthusiasm for its contribution to this altogether more ambitious project. Goebel's own violin playing seems to me expressive in almost every detail sometimes conveying passion, but more often the deep pathos contained in so much of the music. His account of the poignant little sinfonia of Johann Michael Bach's Auf, lasst uns den Herren loben is just one of many instances where he eloquently captures the spirit of the music. In the larger scale pieces such as Johann Christoph's Es erhub sich ein Streit, Goebel directs his 22-part ensemble with skill and vivid imagination. Few if any listeners will be disappointed either by the music or the thrilling performance.

The vocal contributions are mostly stylish and convincing. I have reservations, however, about the bass, Michael Schopper. In most of the pieces in which he sings he blends fairly well with the other soloists though he sounds somewhat more closely balanced than they do; but his important opening music in Johann Christoph's Meine Freundin, du bist schon is a disappointment. An element of theatre is certainly required here and throughout the cantata, but Schopper over-acts his part and is tempted, it would seem, to play to the gallery. He might just have got away with it but for the fact that his intonation is a little insecure and there is a decided tendency to sing under the note. Later on, he settles more comfortably into the piece. Perhaps, once again, however, it is Goebel himself who steals the show with some splendidly incisive and communicative violin playing. In the several choral movements which feature in the anthology the Rheinische Kantorei sound fresh and well disciplined.

To sum up, this is an issue of distinction and an important addition to our recorded catalogue of music. The level of artistic creativity in a single family is cause enough for wonder, but when it is complemented by performances of this calibre we can be doubly thankful. Excellent recorded sound and full texts in accordance with Archiv Produktion's usual high standard. Bravo!

-- Nicholas Anderson, Gramophone [2/1987]

Here's another one of those Bach family samplers that, while not revealing any more than we already know regarding the towering superiority of Johann Sebastian, does bring to light works that were only "recently discovered". All were written by relatives older than Sebastian, and among these the most interesting are the Overture (Suite) in G and Concerto in D by Johann Ludwig (1677-1731). The former, for strings, a pair of oboes, and continuo, begins boldly in the most formal French manner, then springs into a lilting, tuneful Air, followed by a bouncy Menuet, appropriately lively yet sturdy Gavotte, a second Air even more playful (and Handelian) than the first, and concluding with an infectious Bourrée. Ludwig's Concerto shows an affinity for oboe writing in the Adagio and a grasp of energetic dance-rhythm in the final Allegro that in a world without the younger Sebastian certainly would have made a grander impression. But the decidedly artful work of the older Ludwig ultimately compels us to appreciate even more what the genius Sebastian could do with virtually the same materials. We're given that chance at the end of the disc, where Reinhard Goebel and his excellent period-instrument Musica Antiqua Köln offer the fulfillment of an intriguing and oft-discussed notion: that the opening two-movement Sinfonia of Bach's Easter Oratorio forms two-thirds of a three-movement concerto--completed by the oratorio's opening chorus, which these performers happily (and successfully) add in a version "reconstructed" for instruments alone.

Of course, just because your name is Bach and you happen to be a musician doesn't guarantee your ability to write memorable music--or even music worthy of any special attention. That's proven by the two rather square, harmonically predictable, rhythmically staid sonatas "for five instruments" by Heinrich Bach (1615-92), the formulaic "battle" piece by Cyriacus Wilche (d. 1667)--Anna Magdalena's grandfather and thus quite a stretch for inclusion here, and an interminable if inoffensive theme and 15 variations for harpsichord by Johann Christoph (1642-1703). Nevertheless, this is music well worth investigation by anyone who wants to explore a little more deeply the roots of the Bach family tree. The first-rate performances are accompanied by sound that's on the dry side, giving extra bite and a slight rawness to the timbres that works very well for this unusual if not essential repertoire.

--David Vernier, ClassicsToday.com

This is the second ‘Bachiana’ disc from Musica Antiqua Köln, a concept which draws its inspiration from Bach documents and especially the rediscovery in 2000 of the old Berlin Singakademie archive. Yet, as ever with Goebel, the integrity of the programme and its effective conveying of Bach’s forbears and contemporaries is the primary raison d’être. Two generations on from the ubiquitous guilds of 17th-century Bach craftsmen – from Bach’s elders to his progeny – these double concertos reveal the diverse compositional artistry of his four prodigious sons.

Johann Christian, the ‘London Bach’, is presented here as the grand entertainer, a congenial presence but whose Sinfonia Concertante inA major receives a disappointingly astringentreading; the solo cellist especially struggles to beguile, and intonation is not all it should be either. JCB’s virtues are better rendered in CPO’s series with Anthony Halstead and the Hanover Band.

Considerably more interesting is Wilhelm Friedemann Bach’s Flute Concerto, a product of the new cache of 2000. The second movement is a fine, extended largo which displays WFB’s notable capacity for drawing on his father’sdistillation of ‘enlightenment’ gesture (such as in the Musical Offering and Triple Concerto) but also as a bold and true proprietor of the new Emfindsamkeit (‘sensitivity’). It could be argued that WFB never quite realised his potential despite all the advantages he enjoyed as the eldest son. There is indeed a lurking poignancy in much of his music, one which the flautist, Verena Fischer, is supremely alert to in theintimacy and vulnerability she brings to the largo. She also sparkles appropriately in thedialogues of the outer movements.

Musica Antiqua convey equal vitality and character to the two most striking rarities here. JCF Bach’s double concerto for fortepiano and viola appears as a prototype symphony with important solo interjections. Melodically unexceptional, it is nevertheless stylish in a jejune way. CPE Bach – the most iconoclastic of the sons – successfully combines the prevailing keyboard instruments of the day, harpsichord and fortepiano. Fingers fly with aplomb – and no little mischief – as one is left to ponder the impact of this last Bach generation on Mozart and Beethoven, with whom there were (and are) of course many significant connections. Goebel provides a historical wake-up call.

-- Jonathan Freeman-Attwood, Gramophone [7/2003]

This intriguing program continues Goebel’s recent exploration of the music of the Bach family, so far concentrated on instrumental music ( Fanfare 25:4 and 26:6). The apparent odd man out this time is the Viennese court composer Francesco Conti (1682-1732), but his fine motet earns its place by dint of being one of the works copied out by J. S. Bach, who performed it at Cöthen in 1716. The disc’s generic title can be safely ignored, since it truly applies only to the well-known and deeply felt Johann Christoph Bach lament, which is given with violins replacing the dark viols that contribute so much to the piece’s profound effect. There are in any event a number of superior performances to that on offer here (Robin Blaze, Andreas Scholl, and Gerard Lesne, to name but three personal favorites), which suffers from inappropriate gestures and mannerisms on the part of both singer and director.

The rest follows the familiar Goebel pattern of alternating between insightful, dramatic music-making and the downright perverse, but overall the excellent singing of Kožená tips the balance in favor of the disc. The Conti follows the familiar format of alternating recitative and arias, the whole completed with a brilliant Alleluia. On face value, the subject matter, an ecstatic counter-Reformation text that moves from painful longing to joyous celebration of the mystical union of the soul with Christ, might seem an unlikely topic to attract the Lutheran Bach, but it’s worth recalling that Bach himself explored such sentiments in cantatas such as Ich geh und suche , BWV49. The performance gets off to a fine start, with Kožena’s rapt singing of the opening accompanied recitative immediately drawing in the listener. But the first aria finds Goebel up to his old tricks, with chords sliced through with a brusqueness that serves to undermine any Italianate lyricism the singer tries to instill. Bach would doubtless have admired not only the restraint with which Conti handles the rapturous text of the second aria, but also its lovely obligato violin solo, most winningly played by Stephan Schardt. Kožená’s singing of it is gorgeous.

Vernügte Ruh , BWV170, is one of Bach’s most treasured solo cantatas. One of three composed for alto in 1726, it has long been a favorite with altos of both sexes, having received memorable performances over the years from the likes of such as Janet Baker and Andreas Scholl. Kožená’s would easily have been a candidate to join any select list, were it not for the fact that both the opening and closing arias are virtually wrecked by Goebel’s heavy handed emphasis on the first beat of the measure in the first, and further examples of chord “cleaving” in the second. Both the serene Bach aria Bekennen will ich , and the tiny secular cantata by his second son go well, but the highlight of the disc is the wonderful performance of the scena by Bach’s second youngest son, Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach, the so-called “Bückeburg Bach.” Composed in 1773, Die Amerikanerin was described as a “lyric painting.” The text by Heinrich Wilhelm von Gerstenberg is a rapturous outpouring of love by a young Indian for his Zaïde. The music is through composed and surges with a vivid, passionate intensity that at times brings reminders of Gluck. Kožená responds to the music with glorious freedom and an ardent urgency that culminates in a sensual, barely whispered climax. Goebel is on his best behavior here, too, and the disc is worth hearing for this remarkable work, and its equally remarkable performance. As to the rest, well, as I’ve suggested Goebel’s idiosyncrasies make it a mixed bag. Kožená’s legion of admirers are hardly likely to be too troubled by that, and will certainly find their favorite in fresh, resplendent voice.

FANFARE: Brian Robins
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Works on This Recording

1. Es erhub sich ein Streit by Johann Christoph Bach
Performer:  Maria Zedelius (Soprano), Ulla Groenewold (Alto), Paul Elliott (Tenor),
Stephen Varcoe (Bass)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1986 
Venue:  Immanuelskirche, Wuppertal 
Length: 7 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: German 
2. Ach, dass ich Wassers genug hätte by Johann Christoph Bach
Performer:  David Cordier (Countertenor)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1986 
Venue:  Immanuelskirche, Wuppertal 
Length: 8 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: German 
3. Herr, wende dich und sei mir gnädig by Johann Christoph Bach
Performer:  David Cordier (Countertenor), Hein Meens (Tenor), Paul Elliott (Tenor),
Michael Schopper (Bass)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1986 
Venue:  Immanuelskirche, Wuppertal 
Length: 11 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: German 
4. Wie bist du denn, o Gott by Johann Christoph Bach
Performer:  Michael Schopper (Bass)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1986 
Venue:  Immanuelskirche, Wuppertal 
Length: 12 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: German 
5. Die Furcht des Herren by Johann Christoph Bach
Performer:  Michael Schopper (Bass), Paul Elliott (Tenor), David Cordier (Countertenor),
Ulla Groenewold (Alto), Maria Zedelius (Soprano)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Rheinische Kantorei,  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1986 
Venue:  Immanuelskirche, Wuppertal 
Length: 7 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: German 
6. Ich danke dir, Gott by Heinrich Bach
Performer:  Michael Schopper (Bass), Paul Elliott (Tenor), David Cordier (Countertenor),
Ulla Groenewold (Alto), Maria Zedelius (Soprano)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Rheinische Kantorei,  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1986 
Venue:  Immanuelskirche, Wuppertal 
Length: 6 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: German 
7. Ach, bleib bei uns Herr Jesu Christ by Johann Michael Bach
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Rheinische Kantorei,  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: 17th Century; Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1986 
Venue:  Immanuelskirche, Wuppertal 
Length: 5 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: German 
8. Auf, lasst uns den Herren loben by Johann Michael Bach
Performer:  Ulla Groenewold (Alto)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1986 
Venue:  Immanuelskirche, Wuppertal 
Length: 6 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: German 
9. Meine Freundin, du bist Schön by Johann Christoph Bach
Performer:  Paul Elliott (Tenor), David Cordier (Countertenor), Michael Schopper (Bass),
Maria Zedelius (Soprano)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1694; Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1986 
Venue:  Immanuelskirche, Wuppertal 
Length: 22 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: German 
10. Siehe, wie fein und lieblich "Geburtstagkantate" by Georg Christoph Bach
Performer:  Hein Meens (Tenor), Stephen Varcoe (Bass), Paul Elliott (Tenor)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1689; Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1986 
Venue:  Immanuelskirche, Wuppertal 
Length: 6 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: German 
11. Es ist ein grosser Gewinn by Johann Michael Bach
Performer:  Maria Zedelius (Soprano)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1986 
Venue:  Immanuelskirche, Wuppertal 
Length: 4 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: German 
12. Ach, wie sehnlich wart ich der Zeit by Johann Michael Bach
Performer:  Maria Zedelius (Soprano)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1986 
Venue:  Immanuelskirche, Wuppertal 
Length: 7 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: German 
13. Liebster Jesu, hör mein Flehen by Johann Michael Bach
Performer:  Hein Meens (Tenor), Paul Elliott (Tenor), David Cordier (Countertenor),
Maria Zedelius (Soprano), Michael Schopper (Bass)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1986 
Venue:  Immanuelskirche, Wuppertal 
Length: 7 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: German 
14. Suite in G major by Johann Ludwig Bach
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1715; Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/2000 
Venue:  Sendesaal, Deutschland Radio, Cologne 
Length: 15 Minutes 24 Secs. 
15. Sonata a 5 no 1 in C major by Heinrich Bach
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1662; Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/2000 
Venue:  Sendesaal, Deutschland Radio, Cologne 
Length: 5 Minutes 15 Secs. 
16. Sonata a 5 no 2 in F major by Heinrich Bach
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1662; Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/2000 
Venue:  Sendesaal, Deutschland Radio, Cologne 
Length: 4 Minutes 9 Secs. 
17. Concerto for 2 Violins in D major by Johann Ludwig Bach
Performer:  Reinhard Goebel (Violin), Stephan Schardt (Violin)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1728; Meiningen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/2000 
Venue:  Sendesaal, Deutschland Radio, Cologne 
Length: 7 Minutes 14 Secs. 
18. Aria Eberliniana by Johann Christoph Bach
Performer:  Léon Berben (Harpsichord)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1690; Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/2000 
Venue:  Sendesaal, Deutschland Radio, Cologne 
Length: 16 Minutes 16 Secs. 
19. Battaglia for Strings by Cyriacus Wilche
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1659; Weimar, Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/2000 
Venue:  Sendesaal, Deutschland Radio, Cologne 
Length: 7 Minutes 8 Secs. 
20. Easter Oratorio, BWV 249: Sinfonia no 1 in D major by Johann Sebastian Bach
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1732-1735; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/2000 
Venue:  Sendesaal, Deutschland Radio, Cologne 
Length: 11 Minutes 38 Secs. 
21. Sonata and Capriccio for Violin, 2 Violas and Basso Continuo in G minor by Signor Pagh
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: circa 1670; Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/2000 
Venue:  Sendesaal, Deutschland Radio, Cologne 
Length: 7 Minutes 30 Secs. 
22. Sinfonia concertante for Violin and Cello in A major, C 34 by Johann Christian Bach
Performer:  Stephan Schardt (Violin), Joachim Fiedler (Cello)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Classical 
Written: circa 1773; Paris, France 
23. Concerto for Flute in D major by Wilhelm Friedemann Bach
Performer:  Verena Fischer (Flute)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Classical 
Written: circa 1775; Berlin, Germany 
24. Concerto for Viola, Keyboard and Orchestra, C 44 by J. C. F. Bach
Performer:  Robert Hill (Fortepiano), Reinhard Goebel (Viola)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Classical 
Written: circa 1790 
25. Concerto for Harpsichord and Piano in E flat major, Wq 47/H 479 by Carl Philipp Emmanuel Bach
Performer:  Robert Hill (Fortepiano), Léon Berben (Harpsichord)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Classical 
Written: 1788 
26. Ach, dass ich Wassers genug hätte by Johann Christoph Bach
Performer:  Magdalena Kozená (Mezzo Soprano)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 02/2003 
Venue:  Melanchthon Church, Cologne, Germany 
Length: 7 Minutes 22 Secs. 
Language: German 
27. Languet Anima Mea by Francesco B. Conti
Performer:  Magdalena Kozená (Mezzo Soprano)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: Italy 
Date of Recording: 02/2003 
Venue:  Melanchthon Church, Cologne, Germany 
Length: 13 Minutes 24 Secs. 
Language: Latin 
28. Vergnügte Ruh, beliebte Seelenlust, BWV 170 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Magdalena Kozená (Mezzo Soprano)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1726; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 02/2003 
Venue:  Melanchthon Church, Cologne, Germany 
Length: 17 Minutes 49 Secs. 
Language: German 
29. Bekennen will ich seinen Namen, BWV 200 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Magdalena Kozená (Mezzo Soprano)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: ?1742; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 02/2003 
Venue:  Melanchthon Church, Cologne, Germany 
Length: 3 Minutes 21 Secs. 
Language: German 
30. Die Amerikanerin, HW 18 no 3 by J. C. F. Bach
Performer:  Magdalena Kozená (Mezzo Soprano)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Classical 
Written: circa 1773; Bückeburg, Germany 
Date of Recording: 02/2003 
Venue:  Melanchthon Church, Cologne, Germany 
Length: 11 Minutes 12 Secs. 
Language: German 
31. Selma "Sie liebt, mich liebt die Auserwählte", Wq 236/H 739 by Carl Philipp Emmanuel Bach
Performer:  Magdalena Kozená (Mezzo Soprano)
Conductor:  Reinhard Goebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Musica Antiqua Cologne
Period: Baroque 
Written: after 1775; Hamburg, Germany 
Date of Recording: 02/2003 
Venue:  Melanchthon Church, Cologne, Germany 
Length: 2 Minutes 5 Secs. 
Language: German 

Sound Samples

Ach, bleib bei uns, Herr Jesu Christ
Auf, laßt uns den Herren loben
Es ist ein großer Gewinn
Liebster Jesu, hör mein Flehen Dialog zum Sonntag Reminiscere
Ach, wie sehnlich wart' ich der Zeit
Siehe, wie fein und lieblich Geburtstagskantate (Psalm 133)
Meine Freundin, du bist schön Hochzeitskantate
Es erhub sich ein Streit Kantate zum Michaelissonntag
Ach, dass ich Wassers g'nug hätte Lamento
Herr, wende dich und sei mir gnädig Dialogue
Wie bist du denn, o Gott, in Zorn auf mich entbrannt Lamento
Die Furcht des Herren Kantate zu einem Ratswechsel
Ich danke dir, Gott Kantate zum 17. Sonntag nach Trinitatis

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  2 Customer Reviews )
 Bach Family Composers January 7, 2013 By Tiziano Maraldo (Cavasso Nuovo, Pordenone) See All My Reviews "I have just enjoyed myself listening to the music given to us as heritage by the Bach Family ! I would like to say that these CDs once again demonstrate the Musical Genius of Johann Sebastian. No comparison can be made between Him and the Other still value Composers. This collection of recordings also show the evolution of the musical styles along a Century." Report Abuse
 Bachiana CANTATES, adorable treasure December 9, 2012 By S Cohenroellvaneyck (SOUTH WENTWORTHVILLE, NSW) See All My Reviews "Five CDs, the music is not overly stately nor frivolous but very enticing and warming to my heartstrings The performances are very good and so different from the -Bach-Passions- a style of JSB which I did not know. Conclusion YES one should listen and decide that this is VERY very good to hear" Report Abuse
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