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7 With One Stroke!: Concertos By Antonio Vivaldi

Vivaldi / Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra / Daskalakis
Release Date: 07/30/2013 
Label:  Tacet   Catalog #: 205   Spars Code: n/a 
Composer:  Antonio Vivaldi
Performer:  Satoko KoikeSini-Maaria SimonenAdrien IliescuAriadne Daskalakis,   ... 
Conductor:  Ariadne Daskalakis
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
Length: 1 Hours 0 Mins. 

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Notes and Editorial Reviews



VIVALDI Concerto for Three Violins in F, RV 551 1,2,3. Concerto for Violin and Cello in B?, RV 547 4,5. Concerto for Four Violins in e, RV 550 6,7,8,9. Concerto for Two Cellos in g, RV 531 16,17. Concerto for Two Violins in a, RV 522 4,10. Read more class="ARIAL12b">Concerto for Four Violas in e, RV 580 (arr. Neurath) 11,12,13,14. Tito Manlio : Il figlio, il reo (arr. McPhail) 15 1 Adrian Iliescu (vn); 2 Satoko Koike (vn); 3 Sini Simonen (vn); 4 Adriane Daskalakis (vn); 5 Ulrike Eickenbusch (vc); 6 Klaus von Niswandt (vn); 7 Malgorzata Krzyminska (vn); 8 Adriana Coines Escriche (vn); 9 Onur Kestel (vn); 10 Wolfgang Kussmaul (vn); 11 Paul Pesthy (va); 12 Kamila Maslowska (va); 13 Hans-Joachim Dann (va); 14 Emanuel Wieck (va); 15 Renger Woelderink (db); 16 György Bognar; 17 Nikolaus von Bülow; Stuttgart CO TACET 205 (60:09)


Tacet’s release of concertos by Antonio Vivaldi, performed by the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra under the artistic direction of Ariadne Daskalakis, demonstrates—had such a demonstration any longer been necessary—the wide range of the composer’s imagination in combining instruments, both with each other as soloists and with and within the ensemble. In his Concerto for Three Violins, the engineers have placed the soloists, Adrian Iliescu, Satoko Koike, and Sini Simonen far forward, highlighting their virtuosic exchanges in the first movement, their suave and tonally beguiling melodic conversation in the slow movement, and their irresistible rhythmic dynamism in the Finale. All three sound brilliant in the upper registers, with the sort of rhythmic verve that characterized earlier performances by I Solisti Veneti but spiked with the edgy effervescence of more recent period instrument ensembles.


Ariadne Daskalakis serves as violinist, with cellist Ulrike Eickenbusch, in the Concerto for Violin and Cello in which, as Thomas Seedorf points out in the notes, the two instruments share approximately equal soloistic prominence, although the sound of the cello sometimes slips beneath the acoustic horizon in the first movement. In the second movement, however, the two instruments remain at the center of the stage. In the Finale, Eickenbusch frequently mirrors Daskalakis’s brilliant passages.


Klaus von Niswandt, Malgorzata Krzyminska, Adriana Coines Escriche, and Onur Kestel serve as the violin soloists in the four-movement concerto, RV 550, although as the number of soloists increases, many listeners may feel that Vivaldi has crossed the line of demarcation into the concerto grosso. Yet the frequent passages of display in the faster second and fourth movements recall listeners temporarily to the world of the solo concerto.


In the Concerto for Two Cellos, the soloists, György Bognar and Nikolaus von Bülow, emerge as true soloists, setting off their soloistic fireworks with sharply articulated passagework in the first movement and combining eloquently—and touchingly—in the slow movement in a way similar to the interaction of the two violinists in the popular Concerto for Two Violins in A Minor, RV 522 (op. 3/8). The Finale cranks up the energy of these soloists’ interchanges with each other but also with the ensemble.


The Concerto, RV 522 follows, in a reading that recalls the heady vigor of Isaac Stern’s early reading with David Oistrakh in the first movement, but with a somewhat crisper tempo. They don’t romanticize the Larghetto e spiritoso as the older soloists tended to do (and the violin soloists here, Daskalakis and Wolfgang Kussmaul, add an occasional ornament, bringing their performance further up to date). The Finale’s a headlong romp in their reading, but still takes advantage of all the opportunities the composer provided for sonorous interaction between the soloists.


Many listeners will recognize the Concerto in E Minor as the Concerto in B Minor for Four Violins from op. 3, transcribed here for violas by Jochen Neurath. Paul Pesthy, Kamila Maslowska, Hans-Joachim Dann, and Emanuel Wieck (the Orchestra’s viola section) take the four parts, bringing what may seem surprising brilliance, considering the lower registers of the violas, to some of the slow movement’s passagework.


The program concludes with another arrangement, this time of an aria from Tito Manlio , transcribed by Iain McPhail for double bass and orchestra. Renger Woelderink serves as the soloist, bringing true operatic sumptuousness and tonal luxuriance to the solo part.


The program as a whole combines vibrant recorded sound with performances that mix tension and relaxation in a way that never sounds derivative or mannered. It should appeal to almost any aficionado of the composer, except perhaps those who have become exclusive proponents of any period’s most fashionable period instrument sonorities. Very strongly recommended.


FANFARE: Robert Maxham
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Works on This Recording

1.
Concerto for 3 Violins in F major, RV 551 by Antonio Vivaldi
Performer:  Satoko Koike (Violin), Sini-Maaria Simonen (Violin), Adrien Iliescu (Violin)
Conductor:  Ariadne Daskalakis
Period: Baroque 
Written: Venice, Italy 
Date of Recording: 2012 
Venue:  Evangelishe Kirche, Reutlingen-Gönningen 
Length: 9 Minutes 46 Secs. 
2.
Concerto for Violin and Cello in B flat major, RV 547 by Antonio Vivaldi
Performer:  Ariadne Daskalakis (Violin), Ulrike Eickenbusch (Cello)
Conductor:  Ariadne Daskalakis
Period: Baroque 
Written: Venice, Italy 
Date of Recording: 2012 
Venue:  Evangelishe Kirche, Reutlingen-Gönningen 
Length: 8 Minutes 10 Secs. 
3.
Concerto for 4 Violins in E minor, Op. 3 no 4/RV 550 by Antonio Vivaldi
Performer:  Onur Kestel (Violin), Adriana Coines Escriche (Violin), Malgorzata Krzyminska (Violin),
Klaus von Niswandt (Violin)
Conductor:  Ariadne Daskalakis
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1711; Venice, Italy 
Date of Recording: 2012 
Venue:  Evangelishe Kirche, Reutlingen-Gönningen 
Length: 7 Minutes 21 Secs. 
4.
Concerto for 2 Cellos in G minor, RV 531 by Antonio Vivaldi
Performer:  Nikolaus von Bulow (Cello), Gyorgy Bognar (Cello)
Conductor:  Ariadne Daskalakis
Period: Baroque 
Written: Venice, Italy 
Date of Recording: 2012 
Venue:  Evangelishe Kirche, Reutlingen-Gönningen 
Length: 10 Minutes 31 Secs. 
5.
Concerto for 2 Violins in A minor, Op. 3 no 8/RV 522 by Antonio Vivaldi
Performer:  Ariadne Daskalakis (Violin), Wolfgang Kussmaul (Violin)
Conductor:  Ariadne Daskalakis
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1711; Venice, Italy 
Date of Recording: 2012 
Venue:  Evangelishe Kirche, Reutlingen-Gönningen 
Length: 9 Minutes 46 Secs. 
6.
Concerto for 4 Violins and Cello in B minor, Op. 3 no 10/RV 580 by Antonio Vivaldi
Performer:  Hans Joachim Dann (Viola), Paul Pesthy (Viola), Emanuel Wieck (Viola),
Kamila Maslowska (Viola)
Conductor:  Ariadne Daskalakis
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1711; Venice, Italy 
Date of Recording: 2012 
Venue:  Evangelishe Kirche, Reutlingen-Gönningen 
Length: 9 Minutes 30 Secs. 
7.
Tito Manlio, RV 778: Aria. Il figlio, il reo by Antonio Vivaldi
Performer:  Renger Woelderink (Double Bass)
Conductor:  Ariadne Daskalakis
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Italy 
Date of Recording: 2012 
Venue:  Evangelishe Kirche, Reutlingen-Gönningen 
Length: 4 Minutes 14 Secs. 

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