Holiday Shop


WGBH Radio WGBH Radio theclassicalstation.org

Weckmann: Conjuratio / Pierlot, Ricercar Consort

Weckmann / Mena / Mammel / Consort / Pierlot
Release Date: 05/14/2013 
Label:  Mirare   Catalog #: 204  
Composer:  Matthias Weckmann
Performer:  Stephan MacleodCarlos MenaHans Jörg MammelMaria Keohane,   ... 
Conductor:  Philippe Pierlot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ricercar Consort
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  
On sale! $24.98
CD:  $21.99
In Stock



Notes and Editorial Reviews



WECKMANN Sacred Concertos: Weine Nicht; Zion spricht; Herr, wenn ich nur dich habe; Wie liegt die Stadt; Kommet heer zu mir; Wenn der Herr die Gefangenen. Organ preludes: Nun freut euch; Magnificat Secundi Toni; Præmbulum Primi toni Philippe Pierlot, cond; Maria Kohane (sop); Carlos Mena (ct); Hans-Jörg Mammel (ten); Stephan MacLeod (bs); Maude Gratton (org); Ricercar Consort (period instruments) MIRARE 204 (79:00 Read more class="ARIAL12">Text and Translation)


Things seem to come in waves, even those that may be no more than ripples in the gentle tide of music history. So it would seem to be with Matthias Weckmann, organist in the Church of St. Jacob in Hamburg, who had worked alongside Heinrich Schütz in Dresden and found a calling in the aforementioned Pietist city, where he gained considerable fame for his counterpoint and sometimes tortuous sense of harmony. This is my second review of the works by this composer in as many issues, and while in the previous one I expressed an interest in the series continuing with Cantus Cölln, it nonetheless came as a bit of a surprise that two discs of his music, containing some of the same works, would appear one right after the other.


Of course, this would imply that an immediate comparison could be made in those works. For example, in Weine nicht this version is more steadfast and respectful, blending the highly chromatic opening violin lines into a fuller sound. Countertenor Carlos Mena has a nice tone, clear and unambiguous in terms of pitch, though his ornaments (the trills) can sound a bit forced and artificial. When the section “Es hat überwunden” comes in, however, he blends nicely with bass Stephan McLeod and tenor Hans-Jörg Mammel, with each retaining their clearly delineated lines so that they emerge in harmony. In Wie liegt die Stadt so wüste the opening text above the sustained continuo is more mournful than spectral (as in the Cantus Cölln version), and soprano Maria Keohane weaves a sinuous line so that the close dissonances in the strings, when they enter, provides a distinctive contrast. The final duet between the two completes the funereal mood perfectly, though they occasionally break forth in melismatic lines that reveal Weckmann’s ability to write intricate counterpoint.


Of the non-duplicated works, perhaps the more interesting is the organ prelude Nun freut euch , which is securely in the Protestant tradition, with exploration of the different stops and registers of the organ, replete with fantasia moments. The Magnificat has four very different variations, ranging from the first and last with full registration to a more solemn and sonorous second played on the second manual with woodwind stops. The cantata Kommet heer zu mir uses a rich-textured ensemble of violins in their lower registers and gambas to complement McLeod’s expansive bass.


The Ricercar Consort is fully as capable as the Cantus Cölln of fulfilling the requirements of Weckmann’s music. It offers a good partnership with the voices, and both the blend and tempos are extremely fine. As to which of these recordings I prefer, I must say that this is a matter of oranges and apples. For some of the sacred concertos, I prefer Cantus Cölln’s clear definition of the lines and occasional touches of drama, such as in the Wie liegt der Stadt . I will say that Mammel, who appears on both, seems more at ease here, displaying none of the issues of pitch and phrasing that occasionally occurred in the last reviewed disc, and certainly the singing seems more at ease in this one. One might not feel entirely justified in obtaining both, given the amount of overlap, but here it really is a matter of one’s personal taste. For my part, it is rare that one disc just reviewed is so quickly replaced by another, though with the caveat that these are two equally valid interpretations of the music of a major late-17th-century German Lutheran composer. I’d go with this one if you haven’t already added the other to your collection, but it might not be radical enough of a departure to have to have both. That is, of course, unless you are a Weckmann enthusiast.


FANFARE: Bertil van Boer
Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Zion spricht, der Herr hat mich verlassen by Matthias Weckmann
Performer:  Stephan Macleod (Bass), Carlos Mena (Countertenor), Hans Jörg Mammel (Tenor),
Maria Keohane (Soprano), Maude Gratton (Organ)
Conductor:  Philippe Pierlot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ricercar Consort
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1663; Germany 
2.
Wie liegt die Stadt so wüste by Matthias Weckmann
Performer:  Stephan Macleod (Bass), Carlos Mena (Countertenor), Hans Jörg Mammel (Tenor),
Maria Keohane (Soprano), Maude Gratton (Organ)
Conductor:  Philippe Pierlot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ricercar Consort
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1663; Germany 
3.
Wenn der Herr die Gefangnen zu Zion erlösen wird by Matthias Weckmann
Performer:  Stephan Macleod (Bass), Carlos Mena (Countertenor), Hans Jörg Mammel (Tenor),
Maria Keohane (Soprano), Maude Gratton (Organ)
Conductor:  Philippe Pierlot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ricercar Consort
Period: Baroque 
Written: 17th Century; Germany 
4.
Weine nicht, es hat überwunden by Matthias Weckmann
Performer:  Stephan Macleod (Bass), Carlos Mena (Countertenor), Hans Jörg Mammel (Tenor),
Maria Keohane (Soprano), Maude Gratton (Organ)
Conductor:  Philippe Pierlot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ricercar Consort
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1664; Germany 
5.
Nun freut euch, lieben Christen g'mein by Matthias Weckmann
Performer:  Stephan Macleod (Bass), Carlos Mena (Countertenor), Hans Jörg Mammel (Tenor),
Maria Keohane (Soprano), Maude Gratton (Organ)
Conductor:  Philippe Pierlot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ricercar Consort
Period: Baroque 
Written: Germany 
6.
Magnificat im 2 Ton by Matthias Weckmann
Performer:  Stephan Macleod (Bass), Carlos Mena (Countertenor), Hans Jörg Mammel (Tenor),
Maria Keohane (Soprano), Maude Gratton (Organ)
Conductor:  Philippe Pierlot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ricercar Consort
Period: Baroque 
Written: Germany 
7.
Kommet her zu mir alle by Matthias Weckmann
Performer:  Stephan Macleod (Bass), Carlos Mena (Countertenor), Hans Jörg Mammel (Tenor),
Maria Keohane (Soprano), Maude Gratton (Organ)
Conductor:  Philippe Pierlot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ricercar Consort
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1664; Germany 
8.
Herr wenn ich nur dich habe by Matthias Weckmann
Performer:  Stephan Macleod (Bass), Carlos Mena (Countertenor), Hans Jörg Mammel (Tenor),
Maria Keohane (Soprano), Maude Gratton (Organ)
Conductor:  Philippe Pierlot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ricercar Consort
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1663; Germany 

Customer Reviews

Be the first to review this title
Review This Title
Review This Title Share on Facebook




YOU MUST BE A SUBSCRIBER TO LISTEN TO ARKIVMUSIC STREAMING.
TRY IT NOW FOR FREE!
Sign up now for two weeks of free access to the world's best classical music collection. Keep listening for only $19.95/month - thousands of classical albums for the price of one! Learn more about ArkivMusic Streaming
Aleady a subscriber? Sign In