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Dvorak: Complete Published Orchestral Works

Dvorak
Release Date: 05/28/2013 
Label:  Naxos   Catalog #: 8501702  
Composer:  Antonín Dvorák
Performer:  Jénö JandóIlya KalerAlexander TrostianskyMaria Kliegel,   ... 
Conductor:  Stephen GunzenhauserAntoni WitCamilla KolchinskyDmitry Yablonsky,   ... 
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic OrchestraCzecho-Slovak Radio Symphony OrchestraPolish Radio Symphony Orchestra,   ... 
Number of Discs: 17 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

DVORÁK Complete Published Orchestral Works Various Conductors, Artists, and Ensembles NAXOS 8.501702 (17 CDs: 1131:38)

This 17-disc set, assembled from recordings made over a 16-year period (the earliest in 1987, the latest in 2003), really does seem to comprise Dvorák’s complete published orchestral works, as advertised, and then some. The “then some” are things like overtures and orchestral excerpts from the composer’s operas, which are normally considered part of his stage works, and the wind serenade, Read more normally categorized as a chamber work. Not included, however, are some smaller arrangements made for orchestra of pieces originally written for other instruments, an omission that’s eminently sensible; otherwise, this set might have expanded to 20 CDs or more.

Disc 1: Symphony No. 1 in c, “The Bells of Zlonice.” Legends 1–5 Stephen Gunzenhauser, cond; 1 Slovak PO; 2 Slovak RSO From: Naxos 8.550266 (1991)

Reviewed: N/R

Based on numbers of recordings, it’s probably safe to say that Dvorák’s First and Second symphonies remain his least popular. Having fewer competitors, however, doesn’t automatically assure Gunzenhauser a place among the top contenders, for a number of distinguished Dvorák conductors have made lasting impressions in these works, not least of which are Václav Neumann with the Czech Philharmonic, Rafael Kubelík with the Berlin Philharmonic, István Kertész with the London Symphony Orchestra, and one of my favorites, Witold Rowicki, also with the LSO. Gunzenhauser has a sound grasp of the score and maintains good discipline over the Slovak Philharmonic in the symphony, but the orchestra sounds a little undernourished compared to the venerable Czech and London ensembles. Legends , a cycle of 10 short pieces, originally composed for piano four hands, then orchestrated by the composer for a slightly downsized ensemble of instruments, is split between disc one and disc two.

Disc 2: Symphony No. 2 in Bb. Legends 6–10 Stephen Gunzenhauser, cond; 1 Slovak PO; 2 Slovak RSO From: Naxos 8.550267 (1991)

Reviewed: N/R

I could just say “ditto” on this second CD in the set. Recorded performances of the Second Symphony remain pretty much limited to the same conductors and orchestras as for the First Symphony. Even more limited, which really surprised me, are recordings of the orchestral version of Legends . A recent BIS recording with trombonist-turned-conductor Christian Lindberg leading the Nordic Chamber Ensemble received a positive review by Boyd Pomeroy in 34:1, but it comes coupled with a performance of Dvorák’s Violin Concerto, which will be appreciated only by those who find violinist Richard Tognetti’s tart tone a thing of beauty.

Disc 3: Symphony No. 3 in Eb. Symphony No. 6 in D Stephen Gunzenhauser, cond; Slovak PO From: Naxos 8.550268 (1991)

Reviewed: John Bauman (15:5)

Bauman felt that the Slovak ensemble played well for Gunzenhauser, but that the orchestra sounded a bit underpowered, especially in the bass, an opinion with which I concur. That may, of course, be a result of the recording and/or the acoustic properties of the venue. In any case, Bauman adds one more name of his own, Libor Pesek, to my short list of preferred conductors mentioned above.

Disc 4: Symphony No. 4 in d. Symphony No. 8 in G Stephen Gunzenhauser, cond; Slovak PO From: Naxos 8.550268 (1991)

Reviewed: N/R

When one reaches the Eighth Symphony, the number of available versions expands exponentially. With some 125 listings, it’s second only to the Ninth, which has twice again as many recordings as the Eighth. Among more recent entries to the catalog, Naxos is here competing against itself with Marin Alsop and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra’s ongoing Dvorák cycle, which has received positive reviews. Gunzenhauser and his Slovak forces fare a bit better in Dvorák’s Fourth Symphony with its somewhat more rigid formal outlines and militant mood—its scherzo movement is marked Allegro feroce . But conductor and orchestra seem a bit nonplussed by the more genial and relaxed atmosphere of the Eighth Symphony, trying to drive it harder than it needs or wants to be.

Disc 5: Symphony No. 5 in F. Symphony No. 7 in d Stephen Gunzenhauser, cond; Slovak PO From: Naxos 8.550270 (1989)

Reviewed: John Bauman (15:3)

Baumann called Gunzenhauser’s reading of the Fifth Symphony “perfunctory,” allowed that the conductor’s Seventh was more “sympathetic,” and concluded that for the price this wasn’t a bad disc for someone starting a Dvorák collection.

Disc 6: Symphony No. 9 in e, “From the New World.” Symphonic Variations, op. 78 Stephen Gunzenhauser, cond; Slovak PO From: Naxos 8.550271 (1989)

Reviewed: David Hurwitz (15:4)

Hurwitz liked this “New World,” though he agreed that it, too, like the earlier symphonies in this cycle, was a bit underplayed. That review was written in 1992. I don’t know how many recordings of the piece have been made in the 21 years since then, but I’d venture that of the nearly 250 listed versions, quite a few of them are much more recent arrivals. That doesn’t necessarily guarantee better performances, but not a few of them, both older and newer, are.

In a 29:3 review of a Dvorák Ninth by Paavo Järvi and the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Barry Brenesal observed that “with few exceptions, performances of Dvorák’s Ninth Symphony fall into two camps: those that concentrate upon its propulsive rhythms and dramatic content, and those that focus on its more poetic side.” Basically, I agree with Barry, but I would put it a bit differently. I would say that the two camps divide along lines of those that play up the score’s Czech-inflected melodic and rhythmic elements vs. those that attempt to give the work an “American” spin or flavor.

As familiar with the piece as conductors and orchestras are, and as often as Dvorák’s “From the New World” Symphony is played in concert and recorded, you’d think that performing it would be second nature to most professional ensembles, but actually, it’s this dual personality of the music that makes it difficult to read. As a result, most performances are expertly executed on a technical level, but many—even those by topflight conductors and orchestras—don’t quite manage to gel interpretively, leaving the listener feeling ambivalent.

What’s surprising then is not how many recordings of the Ninth there are, but compared, per capita, to the numbers of recordings of the other eight symphonies, how few there are of the work that are Hall of Fame or even Want List candidates. There are, of course, the usual suspects noted above—Neumann, Kertész, Kubelík, Pesek, and Rowicki—to which I’d add a couple of other oldies but goodies—Bernstein’s 1962 version with the New York Philharmonic and George Szell’s 1959 version with the Cleveland Orchestra. Among newer entries, I was very impressed by Andris Nelsons’s recent recording with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra on BR Klassik.

Gunzenhauser and the Slovak orchestra won’t have you waving the Red, White, and Blue, but it’s a perfectly decent, middle-of-the road performance. The positive thing to be said about this Dvorák symphony cycle is that there are no surprises. Gunzenhauser is an experienced Kapellmeister who is even-tempered and consistent throughout, and in his Slovak players he has a solid, reliable band. It’s hard to imagine any serious collector having only one recording of Dvorák’s Ninth Symphony in his or her collection, so on that assumption, this survey of the complete symphonies is nice to have for those who also like to have integral sets that are all of a piece. A similarly packaged Naxos set of Mozart’s symphonies, reviewed elsewhere in this issue, does not enjoy that advantage; it splits the compilation between two different conductors and orchestras, resulting in very different and uneven outcomes.

Once again, with this sixth disc in the set, Naxos enters into direct competition with itself, for Marin Alsop’s well-received Dvorák Ninth with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is an exact duplicate of Gunzenhauser’s program, which couples the symphony with the composer’s Symphonic Variations.

Disc 7: Piano Concerto in g. The Water Goblin Antoni Wit, cond; Jénö Jandó (pn); Polish Natl RSO From: Naxos 8.550896 (1994)

Reviewed: John Bauman (18:3)

Of Dvorák’s three concertos—one each for piano, violin, and cello—the one for piano has always been considered the sorry sister of the lot. Her number of suitors tells the story; only 30 or so have asked her to the ball. The prettier middle sister—the Violin Concerto—has fared much better in the dating game, with nearly 100 wooers. But it’s the youngest and fairest of them all—the Cello Concerto—that has been crowned queen of the prom, and has some 150 boys and girls vying to dance with her.

Dvorák, it has been reported, was not a particularly accomplished pianist, and that may account for why his piano concerto turned out as it did. Or, as the well-known music critic Harold C. Schonberg put it, “Dvorák wrote an attractive Piano Concerto in G Minor with a rather ineffective piano part.” Jénö Jandó, who has made well over 200 recordings for Naxos of wide-ranging repertoire, is what is sometimes referred to in the industry, rather unflatteringly, as a stable-horse artist. He’s a sturdy, sure-footed steed that can be relied upon to traverse almost any terrain, and to get you to your destination safe and sound, but without experiencing the thrill of the ride. That’s a reasonable metaphor for Jandó’s performance of the concerto. He makes neither more nor less of it than the notes on the page. My preferred version of the piece has long been RCA’s 1990 recording with Rudolf Firkusny, Václav Neumann, and the Czech Philharmonic. Together they conjure the magic that frees Dvorák’s Cinderella from her drudgery and transforms her into a princess.

One wonders at Dvorák’s choice of literary sources for his four Karel Jaromir Erben-based tone poems: The Wild Dove, The Golden Spinning Wheel, The Water Goblin , and The Noon Witch . Somehow, subjects of such grim and gruesome gore seem out of character with the composer’s amiable nature. But the latter years of the 19th century and early years of the 20th, in particular, are replete with novels, poetry, paintings, and musical works seemingly fixated on themes of murder, mayhem, and madness. All four of Dvorák’s above-named tone poems explore nightmarish phantasms and unimaginably hideous, heinous acts.

The Water Goblin (1896), on the present disc, introduces us to a desperately lonely, turned sadistically evil, sociopath who inhabits a lake, abducts a young girl on the eve of her wedding, holds her hostage in his watery lair, and fathers a child with her. When the girl pleads to be allowed to see her mother one last time, the Water Goblin agrees on condition that she leaves the baby behind and that she returns when the evening church bells ring. Long story short: when the girl doesn’t return, the Water Goblin exacts his revenge by killing and decapitating the infant, leaving “a tiny head without a body and a tiny body without a head” at the doorstep of the girl and her mother.

Antoni Wit’s reading with the Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra is appropriately atmospheric, but you won’t do better than Deutsche Grammophon’s three-disc bargain-priced set with Kubelík and the Bavarian Radio Orchestra, containing the four tone poems plus a number of Dvorák’s overtures and other orchestral works.

Disc 8: Violin Concerto in a. Romance in f for Violin and Orchestra, op. 11 Mazurka for Violin and Orchestra, op. 49 1 Camilla Kolchinsky, cond; 1 Ilya Kaler (vn); 1 Polish Natl RSO; 2 Dmitri Yablonsky, cond; 2 Alexander Trostianski (vn); 2 Russian PO From: Naxos 1 8.550758 (1994); 2 8.557352 (2003)

Reviewed: 1 NR; 2 James North (28:5)

If the above header is a bit confusing, it’s because this eighth disc in the set was reassembled from two different Naxos CDs recorded nine years apart. The reconstituting makes sense because the original disc containing the Violin Concerto performed by Ilya Kaler was paired with Glazunov’s Violin Concerto, and since this is an all-Dvo?ák collection, a work by another composer in the middle of it wouldn’t do. The original disc containing the Mazurka played by Alexander Trostianski, however, did contain an all-Dvo?ák program made up of several of the composer’s shorter pieces. Those have been variously recombined on other discs in this set.

Dvorák played the violin, and quite well, too, according to a number of contemporary accounts, so it stands to reason that he’d have better luck writing a violin concerto than he had writing a piano concerto, and the presence of close to 100 recordings in the catalog would seem to attest to that success. But have you ever listened to a work by a famous composer, and thought to yourself, “This just isn’t worthy of his reputation?” That’s the feeling I experience every time I hear this piece. There’s something wrong with it, though it’s hard to put into words exactly what it is. It has all of the makings to be one of the violin repertoire’s great concertos, yet somehow, it just misses the mark. It has attractive melodies, but they’re not that attractive. It’s infused with catchy folk rhythms and memorable Czech harmonies, but they’re not that catchy or memorable. And it has its share of pulse-quickening virtuosic passages, but they’re not that pulse-quickening. Still, these are deficits rather than outright defects. The concerto’s most noticeable flaw, I think, lies in its structural oddities—a first-movement recapitulation that is derailed from its tracks by the abrupt and too early arrival of the second movement, a second movement that is then too long and rambling, and a finale in which, at many points, the solo violin and the orchestra seem to be playing two different pieces. Joseph Joachim, the score’s intended dedicatee, noted these issues, though he diplomatically didn’t confront Dvo?ák about them. Nevertheless, he kept making excuses to the composer for putting off a public performance of the work, and he never did play it.

Although the piece, as noted above, has amassed quite a few recordings by a number of famous violinists, it has never achieved the kind of universal acclaim and audience popularity enjoyed by the Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, and Sibelius concertos. Arguably, the iconic, if not definitive, recording of Dvo?ák’s violin concerto is the one with Nathan Milstein and William Steinberg conducting the Pittsburgh Orchestra, made in 1957. Well worth hearing too is the 1936 recording Yehudi Menuhin made with his teacher and mentor, George Enescu. The Dutton Laboratories/Vocalion CD transfer is remarkably good. Among more recent comers to the concerto—Arabella Steinbacher, Isabelle Faust, Julia Fischer, James Ehnes, and Jack Liebeck—none can be faulted on technical grounds, but I’ve yet to hear another violinist after Milstein who better captured the Czech idioms and spirit of the piece.

I must say that I was pleasantly surprised by Ilya Kaler’s way with the concerto on this disc. Like Jénö Jandó, Kaler has also become somewhat of a Naxos stable-horse; 26 of his 29 listed recordings are on the Naxos label. But that doesn’t detract from the fact that he’s a very fine player and his performance of Dvo?ák’s concerto overflows with warm feeling and a kind of homey sweetness. I also like the fact that Kaler sails smoothly and uneventfully through the virtuosic passages without making an exhibitionistic display of them or of himself. I’d have to describe this as one the most easy-going, natural-sounding versions of the piece I’ve heard.

Partially salvaged from an abandoned early string quartet, the Romance for Violin and Orchestra was reworked by Dvo?ák into this lovely stand-alone slow movement, which receives a very sympathetic reading by Kaler, Kolchinsky, and the Polish National Radio Orchestra.

Switching teams for the Mazurka, Alexander Trostianski joins the Russian Philharmonic led by Dmitry Yablonsky. Choices are slim when it comes to recordings of this six-minute piece; ArkivMusic currently lists only six, and frankly, I haven’t heard any of the others. In reviewing the original Naxos disc of Dvo?ák miscellany on which Trostianski’s Mazurka was included, James North expressed an opinion about the violinist I share; he described Trostianski’s playing as “colorful but rough.” I’ll be even less charitable. Trostianski (whom I’d not heard of before) is the kind of player that sets my teeth on edge, with abrasive bowing and an aggressive, take-no-prisoners approach that grates my on ears and nerves alike.

Disc 9: Cello Concerto in b. Silent Woods, op. 68/5. Rondo for Cello and Orchestra, op. 94 1 Michael Halász, cond; 1 Maria Kliegel (vc); 1 Royal PO; 2 Felix Korobov, cond; 2 Dmitry Yablonsky (vc); 2 Russian PO From: Naxos 1 8.550503 (1992); 2 8.557352 (2003)

Reviewed: 1 Richard Burke (16:4) and Robert McColley (Hall of Fame, 26: 1); 2 James North (28:5)

Like disc eight, this one, too, was retooled for this set. The original release paired Dvo?ák’s Cello Concerto with Elgar’s Cello Concerto. The Elgar was dropped and Silent Woods and the Rondo from a later Naxos CD were substituted in its place.

I hadn’t heard this particular performance of the Dvo?ák concerto before, but I’ve had occasion in the past to review and praise cellist Maria Kliegel performing other repertoire. The fact that the originally constituted CD was awarded entry into Fanfare ’s Classical Hall of Fame by Robert McColley speaks volumes about Kliegel’s talent and artistry.

There’s no denying that of Dvo?ák’s three concertos, the one for cello is by far the best of the lot, but I still hold firm to my opinion, expressed on previous occasions, that Elgar’s concerto is the finer work. But let me not re-argue that here and again. By and large, audiences have embraced Dvo?ák’s score as their favorite cello concerto, a fact reflected by the number of recordings it has received and the Who’s Who of cellodom that have recorded it.

I will further stipulate that Kliegel’s performance is a very fine one, perhaps even one of the very best, but the list of “greats” that have taken the work on is studded with so many star players and outstanding performances that it would be really untoward of me to say that Kliegel’s version is better than, say, János Starker’s with Antal Doráti and the London Symphony Orchestra, Piatigorsky’s with Charles Munch and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Leonard Rose’s with Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orchestra, or Pierre Fournier in recordings he made with Kubelík, George Szell, and Colin Davis. Fans of Jacqueline Du Pré are apt to find one or more of her multiple versions compelling, while other legendary cellists of the past—Pablo Casals, Gaspar Cassadó, Emanuel Feuermann, André Navarra, Zara Nelsova, Antonio Janigro, Paul Tortelier, and Mstislav Rostropovich—have all left their marks on the piece. If your preference runs to something more recent, there’s Jean-Guihen Queyras, Jan Vogler, Jamie Walton, Pieter Wispelwey, and Zuill Bailey.

If you’re not up for purchasing this 17-disc boxed set, Kliegel’s original Naxos CD, which pairs the Dvo?ák and Elgar concertos, is still available and might be preferable to this disc from which you lose the Elgar for a couple of shorter Dvo?ák pieces, one of which, Silent Woods , the composer extracted from a cycle of piano pieces for four hands he later transcribed for cello and piano and then for cello and orchestra.

The Rondo rounds out the disc with a piece Dvo?ák tossed off on Christmas Day, 1891 for Hanu? Wihan, the cellist with whom the composer was touring Bohemia and to whom he would later dedicate his concerto.

Disc 10: Slavonic Dances, op. 46. Slavonic Dances, op. 72 Zden?k Ko?ler, cond; Slovak PO From: Naxos 8.550143 (1988)

Reviewed: John Bauman (15:2)

Pieces of this nature were very popular in their day. Like Brahms’s Hungarian Dances , which served as both inspiration and model for Dvo?ák’s two sets of Slavonic Dances , they were originally composed for piano four hands, and were designed for home music-making by talented amateurs. And just as proved to be the case with Brahms’s dances, Dvo?ák’s were such a hit and sold so many copies that Simrock, publisher of both composers’ pieces, could see his cash cows giving even more milk if the dances were orchestrated.

Bauman was more unkind than usual to these performances in their original release. He called them “routine,” and accused Ko?ler of ignoring nuances and of being lethargic. My reaction to Ko?ler’s readings isn’t quite as negative, but then I have to admit that three or four of Dvo?ák’s Slavonic Dances go a long way with me. If you’re a fan of the pieces, and want all 16 of them on a single disc—there are eight dances in each set—a good bet is Szell’s recording with the Cleveland Orchestra. You can buy the two-channel stereo version at a budget price, or for full price you can have it in its remastered SACD format.

Disc 11: Rhapsody—Symphonic Poem, op. 14. Symphonic Rhapsodies 1–3, op. 45 1 Libor Pe?ek, cond; 2 Zden?k Ko?ler, cond; Slovak PO From: Naxos 8.550610 (1992)

Reviewed: N/R

With this disc we come to two of Dvo?ák’s lesser known scores. The Rhapsody, op. 14, written in 1874 by the then 33-year-old composer, wasn’t published until 1912, eight years after his death. It was originally conceived as a symphonic poem (hence its sometimes alternate title) modeled after Smetana’s Vy?ehrad . To quote from the program notes, “The Rhapsody , overtly nationalist in melodic content, shows a firm handling of the orchestra in a form that is occasionally inclined to the episodic.” At present, this is the only recording of the piece listed by ArkivMusic.

When I indicated in the above header to this disc that it had not been reviewed in these pages, I need to make a slight amendment to that. Both the Rhapsody and the Symphonic Rhapsodies were reviewed, but coupled in completely different combinations of Dvo?ák works when they first appeared on Marco Polo. George Chien reviewed the second of the three Symphonic Rhapsodies (op. 45/2), which appeared on Marco Polo 8.223131 in issue 13:1, and John Bauman reviewed the Rhapsody , op. 14, which appeared on Marco Polo 8.220420, in issue 16:5.

The three Slavonic Rhapsodies never quite caught on like Dvo?ák’s Slavonic Dances , but at least there’s more than this one current listing for them. Kurt Masur recorded them with the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, released on the Eloquence label.

Disc 12: The Noon Witch. The Golden Spinning Wheel. The Wild Dove Stephen Gunzenhauser, cond; Polish Natl RSO From: Naxos 8.550598 (1993)

Reviewed: N/R

This disc brings us the remaining three of Dvo?ák’s four Erben-based tone poems, the first of which, The Water Goblin, was heard on disc seven. More gore-fests are at hand with this triple feature of horror stories.

Pardon the pun, but you might say that The Noon Witch spins a cautionary tale around the warning, “Be careful what you witch for.” A mother summons the Noon Witch to spirit away her misbehaving young son, but when the witch arrives, the mother regrets her rash action and tries to shield the boy from the terrifying creature come to steal the child. Fainting, she falls on top of the child, accidentally smothering him. The father arrives home to find his wife passed out with the body of the dead boy in her arms. The moral of the story is, don’t call for the witch unless you mean it, else bad things will happen.

I’m not sure what the moral of The Golden Spinning Wheel is, unless it’s “an eye for an eye,” or in this case two eyes, two hands, and two feet. A king spies a beautiful young lady, Dorni?ka, and falls in love with her at first sight. He asks Dorni?ka’s stepmother to bring the girl to him at his castle. Complying with his wish, the stepmother and Dorni?ka’s stepsister with Dorni?ka in tow set out on their journey, but murder so foul is afoot. It’s the stepsister, not Dorni?ka, after all, who should be trothed to the king; so stepmother and stepsister proceed to dismember poor Dorni?ka, hacking off her hands and feet and gouging out her eyes. The stepsister then assumes the identity of Dorni?ka and marries the king. The story now goes from grisly and gruesome to ghastly and ghoulish. A magician walking through the forest comes upon what remains of Dorni?ka’s body parts, and sends a messenger to the castle with a proposition for the stepsister imposter: part with your two feet in return for a golden spinning wheel, your two hands for a golden distaff, and your two eyes for a golden spindle. Apparently, it doesn’t take much persuading for the stepsister to agree, for the magician, now in possession the needed parts, reassembles Dorni?ka and brings her back to life. The king, returning home from battle, hears the golden spinning wheel reveal the story of Dorni?ka’s murder, and he goes off to the forest to join her. I guess you could say this one has a more or less happy ending.

The Wild Dove is last in the series of the four Eben tone poems, and its theme is a trifecta of murder, infidelity, and suicide. A woman poisons her husband so she can marry her lover. I guess divorce was out of the question. A wild dove sits atop the grave of the dead husband, singing pitifully day after day, and driving the woman to kill herself out of guilt. I suppose the moral of this story has something to do with the biblical injunctions against murder and adultery, but compared to the decapitation, filicide, and macabre body mutilation encountered in the earlier tone poems, the murder and suicide that take place in The Wild Dove seem like just another day at the office.

I’m kind of surprised this one wasn’t reviewed in a past issue; perhaps it was, but just doesn’t show up in the Fanfare Archive. In any case, it would be nice to have all four of these Eben-based tone poems on a single disc, and at just under 80 minutes in total, they can fit; but I’m aware of only one recording to offer that option, and it’s by Nikolaus Harnoncourt leading the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra. Originally, the tone poems were paired with Harnoncourt’s performances of the symphonies, but sometime before it folded, Warner Classics put out a single, still available, CD (4602212) that united the four tone poems. Other than that, you’re looking at multi-disc sets that spread the tone poems among other of Dvo?ák’s orchestral works.

As with Gunzenhauser’s handling of the symphonies, these performances are fair to middling; they’re well-executed, if a bit laid-back when it comes to highlighting the chill and fright factors inherent in these scores.

Disc 13: Serenade for Strings in e. Serenade for Winds. Nocturne in B, op. 40. Five Prague Waltzes, B 99. Polka in B?, op. 53a/1, “For Prague Students” 1 Jaroslav Kr?ek, cond; 1 Capella Istropolitana; 2 Oslo Phil Wind Soloists; 3 Dmitry Yablonsky, cond; 3 Russian PO From: Naxos 8.573215 (1991)

Reviewed: John Bauman (15:4)

As originally released, this Dvo?ák Serenade for Strings was paired with Josef Suk’s Serenade for Strings. Both are beautiful works, but I’d have to say that Dvo?ák’s contribution to the genre is the most gorgeous string serenade in existence, and it’s a work that a conductor and a string ensemble would have to work very hard to ruin. Leave it alone, and it plays itself. Jaroslav Kr?ek and the strings of the Capella Istropolitana pretty much do just that, so I have no complaints about the performance. Unfortunately, like a number of other discs in this set, the recording is a bit recessed sounding, robbing the strings of some of their bloom. For an utterly sensuous bath in rich, vibrant, sumptuous sound, I’ve always liked Yuli Turovsky’s recording with I Musici de Montréal on a Chandos CD.

Technically speaking, the Serenade for Winds is considered chamber, rather than orchestral, music, and is categorized accordingly. Anyway, this performance is splendid, one of the best things on the 17 discs. The Oslo Philharmonic Wind Soloists huff and puff away with perfect intonation, crisp articulation, superbly graded dynamics, and real musical flair. This easily matches a wonderful recording of the piece I reviewed in 35:3, played by Consortium Classicum.

Regarding the Nocturne in B Major, op. 40/B 47, we have the kind of source discrepancy I love to harp on. The booklet notes to this set state unequivocally that Dvo?ák arranged this piece from the slow movement of a single-movement string quartet in E Minor, written sometime earlier. A Wikipedia entry, however, claims with equal authority that the piece was originally the Intermezzo from the composer’s String Quintet No. 2 in G Major, op. 77/B 49, which the composer withdrew from the quintet, reworked, and then published as the Nocturne we have here. So, which is it?

Well, I tend to trust imslp.org’s published listings of composers’ complete work catalogs more than I do Wikipedia’s fact-challenged entries, and here’s what imslp.org has to tell us about op. 40/B 47: it’s a reworking of part of B 19/WoO. And what is B 19? It’s a string quartet in E Minor, just like the Naxos booklet note says, not a string quintet, like Wikipedia says. So, this time, at least, mystery solved. Wikipedia’s error, I suspect, resulted from a typo which turned B 19 into B 49, an easy slip to make, since the 4 is right above the 1 on a numeric keypad; and B 49 is indeed the G-Major String Quintet. Anyway, the Nocturne is a pretty lyrical lullaby-like piece, about four-and-a-half minutes long.

The Five Prague Waltzes and the B?-Major Polka are occasional pieces, the respective occasions for which they were composed being the National Resource Ball in 1879 and the Prague Academy Ball in 1880. Move over, Johann Strauss, Jr.

Disc 14: 7 Interludes for Small Orchestra, B 15. Czech Suite, Op. 39. Suite in A, Op. 98b/B 190, “American.” Polonaise in E?, B 100. Festival March, Op. 54. 1 Dmitri Yablonsky, cond; 1 Russian PO; 2 Antoni Wit, cond; 2 Polish Natl RSO From: Naxos 1 8.557352 (2003); 2 8.553005 (1994)

Reviewed: 1 James North (28:5); 2 N/R

This is another one of those discs whose contents have been pretty much been shuffled around from their original locations. You will find the Seven Interludes for Small Orchestra listed by ArkivMusic as “Pieces (7) for Orchestra, B 15,” and this is the only recording listed. The booklet note says almost nothing about the work, other than the fact that it was written in 1867 (Dvo?ák would have been 26 at the time), and influenced by Smetana, in whose operas Dvo?ák played violin or viola.

The Czech Suite (1879), on the other hand, is one of the composer’s more popular orchestral works, and has enjoyed a number of fine performances on record, one standout in particular being that by Antal Doráti and the Detroit Symphony Orchestra on Decca. Coincidentally, that CD (414370) happens to contain the Nocturne, Polka , and Prague Waltzes found on disc 13 in this set.

One would expect that a work by Dvo?ák nicknamed “American” would garner more interest than the Suite in A Major has, but it met with a rather cool reception when it was premiered in its orchestral guise in 1910, six years after the composer’s death. The original score was written for piano in 1894, following on the heels of the Ninth Symphony, during Dvo?ák’s stay in the U.S. He orchestrated the piece the following year, around the same time he was working on the cello concerto, and just before he departed New York to return home to Prague. Ironically, the only recording of the work I came across that features an American conductor conducting an American orchestra is a 1990s Elektra/Nonesuch disc with David Zinman and the Rochester Philharmonic. The CD couples Dvo?ák’s Suite with Janá?ek’s Lachian Dances ; and an unidentified track which turns out to be—surprise, surprise—Dvo?ák’s Festival March found on the present disc in this set.

Disc 15: King and Charcoal Burner: Overture. The Jacobin: Excerpts. The Devil and Kate: Excerpts. Rusalka: Excerpts. Dmitrij: Overture. Armida: Overture Robert Stankovsky, cond; Slovak RSO From: Naxos 8.223272 (1989)

Reviewed: James North (28:5)

Disc 16: Vanda: Overture. In Nature’s Realm. Carnival. Othello. My Home Stephen Guzenhauser, cond; BBC P From: Naxos 8.550600 (1993)

Reviewed: James North (28:5)

Disc 17: Hussite Overture. Cunning Peasant (Selma Sedlak): Overture. Dramatic (Tragic ) Overture. Scherzo capriccioso. A Hero’s Song. 1,5 Antoni Wit, cond; 2 Stephen Gunzenhauser, cond; 3 Libor Pes?k, cond; 4 Zden?k Ko?ler, cond; 1,5 Polish Natl RSO; 2-4 Slovak PO From: Naxos 8.553005; Marco Polo 223001; Naxos 8.550376

Reviewed: John Bauman (16:5); George Chien (13:1); N/R

I decided to cover the final three discs in the set (15–17) as a group, because they gather together overtures and orchestral excerpts from Dvo?ák’s operas, his non-stage-work concert overtures, and a non-Erben-based tone poem.

If one reckons Rusalka an opera—technically, it’s classified as a lyric fairy tale—then Dvorák produced 11 operas:

1. Alfred (1870)
2. The King and the Charcoal Burner (1871)
3. The Stubborn Lovers (1874)*
4. The Cunning Peasant (1877)
5. Dmitrij (1881–85)
6. The Jacobin (1887–88)
7. The Devil and Kate (1898–99)
8. Rusalka (1900)
9. Armida (1902–03)
10. Vanda (1875–1883; 1900–01)
11. Saint Ludmila (1901)*

At the very outset of this exceptionally lengthy review, I said that this set really does seem to comprise Dvo?ák’s complete published orchestral works. I may have been premature. The overtures to the above two asterisked operas—assuming overtures to them exist—are nowhere to be found among these 17 CDs. The Stubborn Lovers (aka The Pig-Headed Peasants ), an early one-act comic opera, closed after two performances due to a dispute between the theater manager and the composer over fees. A recording of the work exists on Supraphon with Ji?í B?lohlávek leading the Prague Philharmonic and Chorus and a cast of Czech singers.

Saint Ludmila began life in 1885–86 as a sacred oratorio, and was then reworked into a sacred opera in 1901. The work has been recorded more than once as an oratorio; whether it has ever been recorded in its revised form as an opera, I don’t know. But again, assuming Dvo?ák composed overtures for these two stage works, those overtures are not included in this set.

By now, it may have escaped the bleary-eyed reader’s attention that the overture to one other opera, Alfred , appears not to be included either. But in fact, it is, for it turns out that the overture titled “Dramatic” (or “Tragic” in some sources) is the overture that Dvo?ák composed for his very first operatic effort. Alfred was never staged in the composer’s lifetime, but the overture was too good a piece not to be salvaged as a stand-alone concert work.

The three concert overtures— In Nature’s Realm, Carnival , and Othello —form a trilogy called Nature, Life, and Love . One could say that these scores, which are semi-programmatic, straddle the fence between pure, non-representational orchestral works and story or literary based tone poems. Of the three, Carnival has always been the most popular and is the most often recorded. Once again, familiar names crop up—Kertész, Kubelík, Neumann, Pesék, Rowicki, and Szell—but most pair the overtures with one or another of the symphonies. Disc 16 in this set has the advantage of keeping the trilogy together and of adding a couple of other overtures to the mix.

Two overtures not associated with operas— Hussite and My Home —remain, plus the tone poem, A Hero’s Song . The Hussite Overture was commissioned by the Prague National Theater, which was planning a festive event to celebrate the opening of the newly rebuilt National Theater in 1883, in conjunction with a dramatic trilogy commemorating the Hussite uprising and revolt against the Catholic Church. The theatrical part of the gala never materialized. If it had, Dvorák might have gone on to compose incidental music for the three plays, but the overture is all that came of it.

My Home was also originally intended as incidental music, this time to a play by F. F. Samberk, Josef Kajetán Tyl , but Dvorák’s score survived the play to become an independent overture.

Finally, we have A Hero’s Song , the fifth and last of the composer’s symphonic tone poems. Unlike the four Erben-based tone poems, A Hero’s Song is not based on any literary source, nor does it tell any particular story. Composed in 1897, the piece is Dvorák’s last independent orchestral work, excluding the overtures to the last few operas.

Summation: As a composer, Dvorák was not as circumspect when it came to the works he allowed to be published as was his great contemporary and good friend, Brahms. The upshot is that a good deal of Dvorák’s music is not top-drawer. Much the same can be said, I think, of the performances in this set. None is bad, but very few, if any, can’t be had in better performances and recordings, as long as one is willing to put together a Dvorák collection piecemeal and at much greater expense.

But assuming you’re a dedicated Dvorák fan, and not one who is terribly finicky, the attraction of this set is in having the composer’s (very nearly) complete orchestral works all neatly packaged together in a space-saving box. If nothing else, it can serve as a valuable reference source, and most of the performances are more than adequate and certainly enjoyable. Moreover, ArkivMusic is selling the set for $51.49, which works out to just a couple of pennies over $3.00 per disc. That’s a bargain almost too incredible to resist.

FANFARE: Jerry Dubins Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Symphony no 1 in C minor, B 9 "The Bells of Zlonice" by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1869; Bohemia 
2.
Legends (10) for Orchestra, Op. 59/B 122: no 1 in D minor by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Czecho-Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1881; Bohemia 
3.
Legends (10) for Orchestra, Op. 59/B 122: no 2 in G major by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Czecho-Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1881; Bohemia 
4.
Legends (10) for Orchestra, Op. 59/B 122: no 3 in G minor by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Czecho-Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1881; Bohemia 
5.
Legends (10) for Orchestra, Op. 59/B 122: no 4 in C major by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Czecho-Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1881; Bohemia 
6.
Legends (10) for Orchestra, Op. 59/B 122: no 5 in A flat major by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Czecho-Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1881; Bohemia 
7.
Symphony no 2 in B flat major, Op. 4/B 12 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1865; Bohemia 
8.
Legends (10) for Orchestra, Op. 59/B 122: no 6 in C sharp minor by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Czecho-Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1881; Bohemia 
9.
Legends (10) for Orchestra, Op. 59/B 122: no 7 in A major by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Czecho-Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1881; Bohemia 
10.
Legends (10) for Orchestra, Op. 59/B 122: no 8 in F major by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Czecho-Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1881; Bohemia 
11.
Legends (10) for Orchestra, Op. 59/B 122: no 9 in D major by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Czecho-Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1881; Bohemia 
12.
Legends (10) for Orchestra, Op. 59/B 122: no 10 in D flat major by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Czecho-Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1881; Bohemia 
13.
Symphony no 3 in E flat major, Op. 10/B 34 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1873; Bohemia 
14.
Symphony no 6 in D major, Op. 60/B 112 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1880; Bohemia 
15.
Symphony no 4 in D minor, Op. 13/B 41 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1874; Bohemia 
16.
Symphony no 8 in G major, Op. 88/B 163 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1889; Bohemia 
17.
Symphony no 5 in F major, Op. 76/B 54 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1875; Bohemia 
18.
Symphony no 7 in D minor, Op. 70/B 141 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1884-1885; Bohemia 
19.
Symphony no 9 in E minor, Op. 95/B 178 "From the New World" by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1893; USA 
20.
Symphonic Variations for Orchestra, Op. 78/B 70 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1877; Bohemia 
21.
Concerto for Piano in G minor, Op. 33/B 63 by Antonín Dvorák
Performer:  Jénö Jandó (Piano)
Conductor:  Antoni Wit
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1876; Bohemia 
22.
Water Goblin, Op. 107/B 195 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Antoni Wit
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1896; Bohemia 
23.
Concerto for Violin in A minor, Op. 53 by Antonín Dvorák
Performer:  Ilya Kaler (Violin)
Conductor:  Camilla Kolchinsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1879-1880; Bohemia 
24.
Romance for Violin and Orchestra in F minor, Op. 11/B 39 by Antonín Dvorák
Performer:  Ilya Kaler (Violin)
Conductor:  Camilla Kolchinsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1873-1877; Bohemia 
25.
Mazurek for Violin and Orchestra in E minor, Op. 49/B 90 by Antonín Dvorák
Performer:  Alexander Trostiansky (Violin)
Conductor:  Dmitry Yablonsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Russian Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1879; Bohemia 
26.
Concerto for Cello in B minor, Op. 104/B 191 by Antonín Dvorák
Performer:  Maria Kliegel (Cello)
Conductor:  Michael Halász
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1894-1895; USA 
27.
From the Bohemian forest, Op. 68/B 133: no 5, Silent Woods by Antonín Dvorák
Performer:  Dmitry Yablonsky (Cello)
Conductor:  Felix Korobov
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Russian Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: Bohemia 
28.
Rondo for Cello and Orchestra in G minor, Op. 94 by Antonín Dvorák
Performer:  Dmitry Yablonsky (Cello)
Conductor:  Felix Korobov
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Russian Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1893; Bohemia 
29.
Slavonic Dances (8) for Orchestra, Op. 46/B 83 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Zdenek Kosler
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1878; Bohemia 
30.
Slavonic Dances (8) for Orchestra, Op. 72/B 147 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Zdenek Kosler
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1886-1887; Bohemia 
31.
Symphonic Poem in A minor, Op. 14/B 44 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Libor Pesek
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1874; Bohemia 
32.
Slavonic Rhapsodies (3), Op. 45/B 86 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Zdenek Kosler
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1878; Bohemia 
33.
Noon Witch, Op. 108/B 196 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1896; Bohemia 
34.
Golden Spinning Wheel, Op. 109 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1896; Bohemia 
35.
Wood Dove, Op. 110/B 198 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1896; Bohemia 
36.
Serenade for Strings in E major, Op. 22 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Jaroslav Krcek
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Capella Istropolitana
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1875; Bohemia 
37.
Serenade for Winds in D minor, Op. 44 by Antonín Dvorák
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Oslo Philharmonic Wind Soloists
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1878; Bohemia 
38.
Nocturne for String Orchestra in B major, Op. 40/B 47 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Dmitry Yablonsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Russian Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: ?1875/83; Bohemia 
39.
Prague Waltzes, B 99 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Dmitry Yablonsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Russian Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1879; Bohemia 
40.
Polka in B flat major, Op. 53a/B 114 "For Prague Students" by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Dmitry Yablonsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Russian Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1880; Bohemia 
41.
Czech Suite in D major, Op. 39/B 93 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Antoni Wit
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1879; Bohemia 
42.
Suite for Orchestra in A major, Op. 98b/B 190 "American" by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Dmitry Yablonsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Russian Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1895; USA 
43.
Polonaise in E flat major, B 100 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Dmitry Yablonsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Russian Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1879; Bohemia 
44.
Festival March, Op. 54/B 88 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Antoni Wit
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1879; Bohemia 
45.
King and charcoal burner, B 21: Overture by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Robert Stankovsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  USSR State Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1871; Prague, Czech Republ 
46.
The Jacobin, Op. 84/B 159: Act 1 Prelude by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Robert Stankovsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  USSR State Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1887-1888; Bohemia 
47.
The Jacobin, Op. 84/B 159: Act 2 Prelude by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Robert Stankovsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  USSR State Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1887-1888; Bohemia 
48.
The Jacobin, Op. 84/B 159: Act 3 Ballet by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Robert Stankovsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  USSR State Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1887-1888; Bohemia 
49.
Kate and the Devil, Op. 112/B 201: Overture by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Robert Stankovsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  USSR State Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1898-1899; Bohemia 
50.
Kate and the Devil, Op. 112/B 201: Act 2 Prelude by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Robert Stankovsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  USSR State Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1898-1899; Bohemia 
51.
Kate and the Devil, Op. 112/B 201: Infernal Dance by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Robert Stankovsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  USSR State Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1898-1899; Bohemia 
52.
Kate and the Devil, Op. 112/B 201: Act 3 Prelude by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Robert Stankovsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  USSR State Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1898-1899; Bohemia 
53.
Rusalka, Op. 114/B 203: Overture by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Robert Stankovsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  USSR State Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1900; Bohemia 
54.
Rusalka, Op. 114/B 203: Festival Music "Polonaise" by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Robert Stankovsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  USSR State Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1900; Bohemia 
55.
Dimitrij, Op. 64: Overture by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Robert Stankovsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  USSR State Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1881-1882; Bohemia 
56.
Armida, Op. 115: Overture by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Robert Stankovsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  USSR State Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1902-1903; Bohemia 
57.
Vanda Overture, Op. 25/B 97 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1879; Bohemia 
58.
In Nature's Realm Overture, Op. 91 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1891; USA 
59.
Carnival Overture, Op. 92 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1891; USA 
60.
Othello Overture, Op. 93 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1891-1892 
61.
My Home Overture, Op. 62/B 125a by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1882; Bohemia 
62.
Hussite Overture, Op. 67/B 132 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Antoni Wit
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1883; Bohemia 
63.
The cunning peasant, Op. 37: Overture by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Stephen Gunzenhauser
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1877; Bohemia 
64.
Dramatic Overture, Op. 1/B 16a by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Libor Pesek
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1870; Bohemia 
65.
Scherzo capriccioso, Op. 66/B 131 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Zdenek Kosler
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1883; Bohemia 
66.
Heroic Song for Orchestra, Op. 111/B 199 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Antoni Wit
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1897; Bohemia 
67.
Pieces (7) for Orchestra, B 15 by Antonín Dvorák
Conductor:  Dmitry Yablonsky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Russian Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1867; Bohemia 

Sound Samples

Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, B. 9, "The Bells of Zlonice": I. Allegro
Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, B. 9, "The Bells of Zlonice": II. Adagio molto
Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, B. 9, "The Bells of Zlonice": III. Allegretto
Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, B. 9, "The Bells of Zlonice": IV. Finale: Allegretto
10 Legends, Op. 59, B. 122: No. 1. Allegretto
10 Legends, Op. 59, B. 122: No. 2. Molto moderato
10 Legends, Op. 59, B. 122: No. 3. Allegro giusto
10 Legends, Op. 59, B. 122: No. 4. Molto maestoso
10 Legends, Op. 59, B. 122: No. 5. Allegro giusto
Symphony No. 2 in B-Flat Major, Op. 4, B. 12: I. Allegro con moto
Symphony No. 2 in B-Flat Major, Op. 4, B. 12: II. Poco adagio
Symphony No. 2 in B-Flat Major, Op. 4, B. 12: III. Scherzo: Allegro con brio
Symphony No. 2 in B-Flat Major, Op. 4, B. 12: IV. Finale: Allegro con fuoco
10 Legends, Op. 59, B. 122: No. 6. Allegro con moto
10 Legends, Op. 59, B. 122: No. 7. Allegretto grazioso
10 Legends, Op. 59, B. 122: No. 8. Un poco allegretto e grazioso
10 Legends, Op. 59, B. 122: No. 9. Andante con moto
10 Legends, Op. 59, B. 122: No. 10. Andante

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