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Lullaby & Nocturne / David Hays, Peter Collins

Schubert / Liszt / Ravel / Hays / Collins
Release Date: 05/14/2013 
Label:  Msr   Catalog #: 1436   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Franz Xaver NerudaIgor StravinskySergei LyapunovFritz Kreisler,   ... 
Performer:  David HaysPeter Collins
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
Length: 1 Hours 7 Mins. 

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Notes and Editorial Reviews



LULLABY & NOCTURNE David Hays (vn); Peter Collins (pn) MSR 1436 (67:28)


NERUDA Berceuse. STRAVINSKY The Firebird: Berceuse. LYAPUNOV Berceuse. KREISLER Berceuse romantique. FIELD Nocturne No. 6. Read more CHOPIN (arr. Wilhelmj) Nocturne in D?. SCHUMANN Abendlied. GODARD Jocelyn: Berceuse. BRAHMS Wiegenlied. DEBUSSY Rêverie. SCHUBERT Lullaby. LISZT Nocturne No. 3. SZYMANOWSKI Notturno. HOVHANESS Oror. RAVEL Berceuse sur le nom Gabriel Fauré. FAURÉ Dolly Suite: Berceuse. TCHAIKOVSKY Lullaby in a Storm. GRIEG Lyric Pieces: At the Cradle


Violinist David Hays and pianist Peter Collins have assembled a program of lullabys and nocturnes, which they recorded on July 10 and 13, 2012, in Missouri State University’s Ellis Recital Hall (both instrumentalists serve on the institution’s faculty). They give a somewhat (appropriately?) sedate account of Franz Neruda’s Berceuse that the engineers have captured up close—close enough to pick up heavy breathing. In their performance of Igor Stravinky’s Berceuse, the hall seems to resonate sympathetically to the violin’s lower registers, making passages in them protrude in a way that some listeners may find ungainly. But Sergei Lyapunov’s Berceuse , allowing the violin to soar in the upper registers, serves to showcase the tonal qualities of Hays’s violin, made by Carl George in 1937. Fritz Kreisler’s Berceuse romantique , one of his infrequently heard salon miniatures, seems to lack in this performance the kind of ingratiating warmth; listening to the composer’s recording with Carl Lamson from about 1916 reveals Kreisler’s greater flexibility in pushing and pulling the tempos and his more pronounced and more highly individual portamentos. Hays’s reading sounds like prose; Kreisler’s, like poetry. Nevertheless, Hays’s tone sounds richly suggestive when he dips into the lower registers. The duo follows with John Field’s Nocturne, which the notes describe as subtitled “Berceuse,” with one of Chopin’s works in the same genre, in this case, transcribed by the German virtuoso (infamous as arranger of the air from Johann Sebastian Bach’s Orchestral Suite in D Major, among other things). Although Field’s work may seem slender in comparison with Chopin’s, which follows it in the program, the duo takes a sensitive approach to it. Hays seems to experience moments of awkwardness in the double-stopped version of Chopin’s work (what might he have done had not Wilhelmj transcribed it into a more accommodating key—Nathan Milstein reportedly expanded his command of violin technique by playing Chopin’s piano passagework on the violin); but his moments of greatest discomfiture come in the lyrical passages rather than in surmounting technical challenges—and he does play the final chords, which rise in double-stops, with a secure command.


A relatively straightforward performance of Robert Schumann’s Abendlied , a brief work simpler both melodically and harmonically, leads to Benjamin Godard’s Berceuse from Jocelyn , a popular number that Jascha Heifetz recorded with Bing Crosby (think of the famous collaborators: Fritz Kreisler and John MacCormack, Mischa Elman and Enrico Caruso—and Jascha Heifetz and Bing Crosby). Collins sets the mood sensitively for Hays’s exploratory, recitative-like entrance, and the tune follows in a sweetly redolent performance that holds its own in its own way. In Brahms’s familiar, brief Wiegenlied , the duo recreates a similar sensibility—simple, serene, and convincing. Violinists don’t often play it, but Claude Debussy’s Rêverie used to appear in collections of salon pieces for violin and piano. If it possesses a similarly, deceptively simple core, Franz Schubert’s Lullaby may fail for many listeners to evoke the primal response that the preceding two works elicit in these performances. But Franz Liszt’s Nocturne delivers a more complex message, both in conception and in this performance, in which Hays displays a more varied tonal palette. The duo gives a haunting account of Szymanowski’s Notturno (from the Nocturne and Tarantella ) that allows them to frame a complex stylistic musical argument (making the piece something of an outlier in the program). They sound very assured in Hovhaness’s Oror , but equally so in Ravel’s subtle Berceuse (though very different from—and considerably more heated and assertive than—Nathan Milstein’s reading with Leon Pommers from 1957. If their account of Gabriel Fauré’s Berceuse seems too urgent to some listeners, they effectively recreate the poignancy of Tchaikovsky’s Lullaby in a Storm and bring the program to a gentle end with Grieg’s “At the Cradle.”


At its best moments, as in Godard’s Berceuse , Brahms’s Wiegenlied , Liszt’s Nocturne, Hovhaness’s Oror , Ravel’s Berceuse , and, perhaps especially, Szymanowski’s Notturno , Hays’s and Collins’s collection presents stylish explorations of the genre that rise well above the level that would merit snideness. Recommended, then, primarily on the basis of those moments of heightened expressivity.


FANFARE: Robert Maxham
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Works on This Recording

1.
Slavonik Cradle Song, Op. 11 by Franz Xaver Neruda
Performer:  David Hays (Violin), Peter Collins (Piano)
Period: Post-Romantic 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 2 Minutes 37 Secs. 
2.
The Firebird: Berceuse by Igor Stravinsky
Performer:  David Hays (Violin), Peter Collins (Piano)
Period: Modern 
Written: 1919; Russia 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 3 Minutes 9 Secs. 
3.
Transcendal Études, Op. 11: No. 1. Berceuse by Sergei Lyapunov
Performer:  Peter Collins (Piano), David Hays (Violin)
Period: Post-Romantic 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 4 Minutes 17 Secs. 
4.
Berceuse romantique, Op. 9 by Fritz Kreisler
Performer:  Peter Collins (Piano), David Hays (Violin)
Period: Romantic 
Written: Austria 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 4 Minutes 5 Secs. 
5.
Nocturne for Piano no 6 in F major, H 40 by John Field
Performer:  Peter Collins (Piano), David Hays (Violin)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1817; England 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 5 Minutes 36 Secs. 
6.
Nocturnes (2) for Piano, Op. 27: no 2 in D flat major, B 96 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Peter Collins (Piano), David Hays (Violin)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1835; Paris, France 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 7 Minutes 11 Secs. 
7.
Lieder Op. 85: No. 12 Abendlied (Evening Song), by Robert Schumann
Performer:  Peter Collins (Piano), David Hays (Violin)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1849 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 3 Minutes 11 Secs. 
8.
Jocelyn, Op. 100: Ah! ne t'éveille pas encor "Berceuse" by Benjamin Godard
Performer:  Peter Collins (Piano), David Hays (Violin)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1888; France 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 5 Minutes 7 Secs. 
9.
Songs (5), Op. 49: no 4, Wiegenlied by Johannes Brahms
Performer:  Peter Collins (Piano), David Hays (Violin)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1868; Austria 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 1 Minutes 47 Secs. 
10.
Rêverie by Claude Debussy
Performer:  Peter Collins (Piano), David Hays (Violin)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1890; France 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 4 Minutes 40 Secs. 
11.
Wiegenlied, D 498/Op. 98 no 2 by Franz Schubert
Performer:  Peter Collins (Piano), David Hays (Violin)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1816; Vienna, Austria 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 1 Minutes 41 Secs. 
12.
Liebesträume for Piano, S 541: no 3, O Lieb, so lang by Franz Liszt
Performer:  Peter Collins (Piano), David Hays (Violin)
Period: Romantic 
Written: circa 1850; Weimar, Germany 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 4 Minutes 46 Secs. 
13.
Nocturne and Tarantella, Op. 28: Nocturne by Karol Szymanowski
Performer:  Peter Collins (Piano), David Hays (Violin)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1915; Poland 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 5 Minutes 20 Secs. 
14.
Lullaby for Violin and Piano, Op. 1 "Oror" by Alan Hovhaness
Performer:  Peter Collins (Piano), David Hays (Violin)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1927; USA 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 2 Minutes 58 Secs. 
15.
Dolly Suite, Op. 56: No. 1. Berceuse by Gabriel Fauré
Performer:  David Hays (Violin), Peter Collins (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1893-1896; France 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 2 Minutes 49 Secs. 
16.
Lyric Pieces, Op. 68: No. 5. At the Cradle by Edvard Grieg
Performer:  David Hays (Violin), Peter Collins (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1897-1899 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 2 Minutes 50 Secs. 
17.
Berceuse sur le nom de Fauré by Maurice Ravel
Performer:  Peter Collins (Piano), David Hays (Violin)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1922; France 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 2 Minutes 58 Secs. 
18.
Children's Songs (16), Op. 54: no 10, Lullaby in a storm by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Performer:  David Hays (Violin), Peter Collins (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1883; Russia 
Venue:  Ellis Recital Hall, Missouri State Unive 
Length: 2 Minutes 17 Secs. 

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