WGBH Radio WGBH Radio theclassicalstation.org
Welcome to ArkivMusic, the retail store for classical.net!

Phinot: Missa Si Bona Suscepimus, Etc / Stephen Rice


Release Date: 08/11/2009 
Label:  Hyperion   Catalog #: 67696   Spars Code: n/a 
Composer:  Claude de SermisyDominique Phinot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Brabant Ensemble
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
Length: 1 Hours 14 Mins. 

Low Stock: Currently 3 or fewer in stock. Usually ships in 24 hours, unless stock becomes depleted.  
On sale! $21.98
CD:  $14.99
Low Stock



Notes and Editorial Reviews



PHINOT Pater peccavi. Missa Si bona suscepimus. Tanto tempore. Iam non dicam vos servos. O sacrum convivium. Incipit oratio Jeremiae prophetae. Magnificat octavi toni. Confitebor tibi. SERMISY Si bona suscepimus Stephen Rice, dir; Brabant Ens HYPERION 67696 (74:13 Text and Translation)


Stephen Rice has done it again. Four of his five previous recordings have focused on a single composer who flourished around 1550, Read more but all were names not entirely unknown to record collectors. This time he resurrects a composer of the same era who is totally unknown on recordings and gives him a whole disc. (We can make allowance for the Sermisy piece that is included because it provided the cantus firmus of his Mass.) Dominique Phinot is undocumented until the 1540s, so Rice can only speculate that he was born sometime around 1510. His works were printed between 1538 and 1555, and he was executed between 1556 and 1561. He published over 100 motets; two masses; Vespers psalms and canticle; and chansons and madrigals. The motets were important as early examples of polychoral writing and what Edward Lowinsky called “the secret chromatic art” of musica ficta . Clearly, his importance to his contemporaries is hard to reconcile with his modern neglect.


The Sermisy motet is a lovely work that provides a flowing cantus firmus for the parody. I was struck by this because my collection shows many chansons of Sermisy but only one disc of lamentations and motets, not including this one (8:2; CD in 9:6). (Otherwise, only a couple of odd items of sacred music can be found in collections.) Hence it adds value to this disc beyond illustrating the source of the cantus firmus . Sermisy was one of many composers of his time who found the passage from the Book of Job a suitably pathetic vehicle for musical expression. “The Lord has given, the Lord has taken away: blessed be the name of the Lord.” The musical line that Sermisy created for the poignant words serves Phinot well in constructing his Mass setting.


The motets are remarkable. Four of them are double-choir settings for eight voices, anticipating in 1548 the Venetian polychoral style. The largest is the prayer of Jeremiah, the fifth chapter of the Book and the last lamentation in the Tenebrae series. Phinot omits the Hebrew letters that introduce each verse (replicating the acrostic Hebrew text), unlike the usual settings. O sacrum convivium is of surpassing beauty as each phrase of the text is exchanged between the two choirs and then repeated by the full choir. The other two double-choir works are settings of Our Lord’s words from the Gospel of John. The Magnificat uses an alternatim setting with the polyphonic verses in four parts until it expands to five voices in the final verse. Confitebor tibi is a psalm regularly used at Sunday Vespers, another alternatim setting with four-voice polyphony. The only five-voice motet is Pater peccavi , which exemplifies Lowinsky’s “secret chromatic art.” The musica ficta calls for a series of flats producing a downward spiral as the prodigal son comes to his senses and decides to return to his father. This is a remarkable way of looking at a motet published in 1538, but the effect is unmistakable. It is the most intriguing work on the whole program.


Rice, who wrote the illuminating notes with Roger Jacob, has outdone the achievement of his first five discs with this fascinating and rewarding offering. If you have not discovered the Brabant Ensemble yet, by all means start here. The group of 11 voices (16 in the double-choir motets) is larger than most vocal ensembles that tackle this kind of music, but it combines the flexibility of a small group with the fuller tone that we hear from a choir. Rice has plowed a rich field, and the harvest is ours.


FANFARE: J. F. Weber


Phinot’s music fully deserves to be better known; only short pieces have found their way onto anthology recordings in the past. The performances do him full justice; they are every bit as good as the earlier recordings by the Oxford-based Brabant Ensemble that I have reviewed.... As I’ve said before, The Tallis Scholars and The Sixteen have some serious competition on their doorstep.

-- MusicWeb International

"This new album from The Brabant Ensemble is a powerful reminder that there are still considerable quantities of early sixteenth-century music to be explored.... Phinot's general renown as a composer is well justified in this beautiful programme of his works which includes a mass, double-choir motets and a fantastic set of Lamentations.... The real eye-opener, however, is Phinot's motet Pater peccavi which tells the story of the prodigal son. Not only is it an absolutely gorgeous piece of music but it is one for the early music buffs as the application of musica ficta leads the singers into deliciously tortured territory during the second half. It was the scholar Edwin Lowinsky who first proposed the idea of a 'secret chromatic art' ... whereby a flat is introduced by one of the singers in order to avoid a certain interval which can, in some cases, lead to a chain reaction of further flats accruing until the piece spirals down a whole semitone as every note is flattened. This is just what happens here when the prodigal son complains ('hic fame pereo…'). The Brabant ensemble manage this tricky device very well.... The Brabant Ensemble and Stephen Rice have carved themselves a distinct niche in the discovery of forgotten masters and I hope these discoveries keep coming." -- Ed Breen, musicalcriticism.com
Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Si bona suscepimus by Claude de Sermisy
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Brabant Ensemble
Period: Renaissance 
Length: 5 Minutes 37 Secs. 
Notes: Director: Stephen Rice. 
2.
Pater peccavi by Dominique Phinot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Brabant Ensemble
Period: Renaissance 
Length: 7 Minutes 50 Secs. 
Notes: Director: Stephen Rice. 
3.
Missa Si bona suscepimus by Dominique Phinot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Brabant Ensemble
Period: Renaissance 
Length: 23 Minutes 9 Secs. 
Notes: Director: Stephen Rice. 
4.
Tanto tempore by Dominique Phinot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Brabant Ensemble
Period: Renaissance 
Length: 3 Minutes 57 Secs. 
Notes: Director: Stephen Rice. 
5.
Iam non dicam vos servos by Dominique Phinot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Brabant Ensemble
Period: Renaissance 
Length: 4 Minutes 23 Secs. 
Notes: Director: Stephen Rice. 
6.
O sacrum convivium by Dominique Phinot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Brabant Ensemble
Period: Renaissance 
Length: 4 Minutes 33 Secs. 
Notes: Director: Stephen Rice. 
7.
Incipit oratio Jeremiae prophetae by Dominique Phinot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Brabant Ensemble
Period: Renaissance 
Length: 11 Minutes 38 Secs. 
Notes: Director: Stephen Rice. 
8.
Magnificat octavi toni by Dominique Phinot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Brabant Ensemble
Period: Renaissance 
Length: 5 Minutes 24 Secs. 
Notes: Director: Stephen Rice. 
9.
Confitebor tibi, Domine by Dominique Phinot
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Brabant Ensemble
Period: Renaissance 
Length: 6 Minutes 56 Secs. 
Notes: Director: Stephen Rice. 

Customer Reviews

Be the first to review this title
Review This Title
Review This Title Share on Facebook




YOU MUST BE A SUBSCRIBER TO LISTEN TO ARKIVMUSIC STREAMING.
TRY IT NOW FOR FREE!
Sign up now for two weeks of free access to the world's best classical music collection. Keep listening for only $19.95/month - thousands of classical albums for the price of one! Learn more about ArkivMusic Streaming
Aleady a subscriber? Sign In