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Malipiero: Cordiali Saluti / Di Mauro, Parrino F & S Orchestra

Malipiero / Parrino / Di Mauro
Release Date: 05/08/2012 
Label:  Stradivarius   Catalog #: 33889   Spars Code: n/a 
Composer:  Gian-Francesco Malipiero
Performer:  Francesco ParrinoStefano Parrino
Conductor:  Francesco Di Mauro
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
Length: 1 Hours 14 Mins. 

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Notes and Editorial Reviews



MALIPIERO Violin Concerto No. 2. 1 Rispetti e Strambotti. Flute Concerto. 2 Symphony No. 6 Franceso di Mauro, cond; Catanzaro “La Grecia” O; 1 Franceso Parrino (vn); 2 Stefano Parrino (fl) STRADIVARIUS STV 33889 (74:04)


Anyone familiar with Read more the music of the supreme Italian modernist Gian-Francesco Malipiero (1882–1973) would probably agree that the most lyrically rich and compelling of his several concertante works is the 1932 First Violin Concerto. As this premiere recording of his second effort in this vein, written 31 years later, demonstrates, Malipiero’s singular language had since evolved in a more rebarbative direction while retaining its essentially uninhibited and improvisatory character, typical of his later style in its tightly wound and almost epigrammatic syntax, acerbic harmonies, and sometimes athematic thorniness of texture. In his long-drawn-out postwar maturity, Malipiero seems to have responded creatively to a good many of the stylistic changes taking place among the younger generation such as Dallapiccola and Maderna (and even the older Petrassi) without ever undermining his idiosyncratic idiom. His adoption of a more chromatic dissonance after his initially modality-based dissonance had little of the neuroticism and aggressive cerebralism of the Warsaw and Darmstadt schools. Nonetheless this Second Violin Concerto is the kind of piece that upon repeated hearings begins to warm up and untangle itself to reveal its hidden treasures.


Also recorded here for the first time is the Flute Concerto of 1967–68, which bears many of the same characteristics as the previous concerto. Cast in four instead of the traditional three movements, this even more laconic work calls for a chamber orchestra whose members contribute occasional soloistic outbursts in conjunction with the flutist’s more pellucid utterances. In his vast catalog Malipiero composed only sporadically for wind instruments in an orchestral setting (there are no concertos for oboe or clarinet and only a serenade for bassoon and none for brass soloists), but this particular occasion seems to have brought out a more supple if sinewy kind of writing for the flute, reminiscent of his chamber works for winds such as the Sonata a quattro.


Apparently Malipiero made a transcription of his remarkable 1920 First String Quartet (“Rispetti e Strambotti”) for full string orchestra. (A colleague informs me there was an earlier recording of this version.) This stupendous work is a product of that incredible outpouring that included the Pause del Silenzio and Impressioni del Vero series (both recently premiere-recorded on Naxos). Its irrepressibly headlong celebration of street cries and countryside songs is like no other string quartet ever written.


The program ends with Malipiero’s Sixth Symphony of 1948, the only one of his 11 numbered and several unnumbered symphonies that calls solely for strings. Its 20-minute-span is derived vaguely from concerto grosso models but given that unorthodox Malipierian twist or two that removes it from the dry academic neoclassicism prevailing at the time. This rather lackluster reading by a rather thin-sounding ensemble gives only a stunted idea of the power and eloquence of the piece, which is more closely captured by Antonio de Almeida in his integral Moscow-based recordings first issued on Marco Polo and since reissued by Naxos. However, the soloists in the two concerto premieres are first-class, the engineering and annotation more than adequate, thus making this release an essential acquisition for all dedicated Maliperians.


FANFARE: Paul A. Snook
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Works on This Recording

1. Violin Concerto No. 2 by Gian-Francesco Malipiero
Performer:  Francesco Parrino (Violin)
Conductor:  Francesco Di Mauro
Period: Modern 
Venue:  Lamezia Terme (CZ) 
Length: 18 Minutes 9 Secs. 
2. Quartet for Strings no 1 "Rispetti e strambotti" by Gian-Francesco Malipiero
Conductor:  Francesco Di Mauro
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1920; Italy 
Venue:  Lamezia Terme (CZ) 
Length: 22 Minutes 5 Secs. 
3. Flute Concerto by Gian-Francesco Malipiero
Performer:  Stefano Parrino (Flute)
Conductor:  Francesco Di Mauro
Period: Modern 
Venue:  Lamezia Terme (CZ) 
Length: 12 Minutes 22 Secs. 
4. Symphony no 6 by Gian-Francesco Malipiero
Conductor:  Francesco Di Mauro
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1947; Italy 
Venue:  Lamezia Terme (CZ) 
Length: 20 Minutes 2 Secs. 

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