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Bach: Sacred Works / Philippe Herreweghe, Collegium Vocale Gent [27-CD Set]


Release Date: 03/13/2012 
Label:  Harmonia Mundi   Catalog #: 2908631   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Werner GüraDietrich HenschelAndreas SchollIan Bostridge,   ... 
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium VocaleGhent Collegium Vocale OrchestraCantate Domino Chorus,   ... 
Number of Discs: 27 
This title is currently unavailable.



Notes and Editorial Reviews

This 27-CD set brings together virtually all Philippe Herreweghe’s recordings of the sacred music of Johann Sebastian Bach (masses, Passions, oratorios, cantatas, motets), which were reissued as CD-books in 2010. Here we present all nine volumes in a (very) limited edition!

Reviews of some of the original recordings that make up this set:

St. Matthew Passion

The advent of period instrument ensembles, though certainly speeding up the tempos a bit, has done nothing to change the three basic interpretive approaches to the St. Matthew Passion: the dramatic, the reverent, and Klemperer's. Gardiner's Archiv recording best represents the dramatic approach, with razor sharp accents and an operatic
Read more gusto to the Evangelist's story telling. Klemperer stands alone, a performance at once monumental, terrifyingly grim, and unsentimental--it's a once-in-a-lifetime event that seems to take about a lifetime to listen to. The first chorus alone lasts practically as long as Passion Week. Reverent or devotional performances were once the common currency of the old German school of the 19th century. Then, they were hushed and slowish. Now, they're hushed and quickish, and the best of these was Herreweghe's first recording from 1985, the most purely beautiful performance of this great work on disc, and a magnificent reinterpretation of a great performance tradition in "authentic instrument" terms.

Given the epic nature of the work itself and the challenges that it represents, it's only fair to ask if Harmonia Mundi was justified, 15 years later, in allowing Herreweghe to re-record the St. Matthew Passion--a privilege accorded few other conductors in a lifetime (Karl Richter was one). The answer, on hearing this new version, must be "Yes." Without sacrificing any of his signature lovely instrumental timbres and choral textures, Herreweghe has moved his interpretation significantly in the "dramatic" direction, and has managed to a remarkable degree to get the best of both worlds. For example, the opening chorus features the same soaring arches of tone, but the chorus now articulates the words more clearly, and the "questions and answer" exchanges between the two choirs are more emphatic, more urgently expressive. His soloists this time around are also a noticeable improvement, particularly countertenor Andreas Scholl, whose technique leaves the earlier version's René Jacobs in the shade.

Ian Bostridge declaims the Evangelist's words with the phrasing and intensity of a really good story teller, while Franz-Josef Selig's Jesus manages to be at once calmly spiritual and textually enlightened, a major achievement in a role that doesn't offer much in the way of contrast. All of the other singers really are as good or better than the competition, with special mention going to Sibylla Rubens, whose soprano arias bring a welcome ray of sunshine into what is, after all, a predominantly dark work. The real hero of this particular tale, though, remains Herreweghe, who has seized the opportunity to reinterpret this great piece in a genuinely vital and meaningful way. It's true that the differences between his two versions might be small--a few seconds here or there in any given number, a slight change of accent or emphasis in a vocal or instrumental line--but over the course of three hours these things matter. In sum, Herreweghe now offers greater emphasis on the meaning of the text through careful word-painting and a more focused vocal and instrumental sound, while maintaining his trademark sonic purity and warmth. This is not easy music, whether to play or to hear, and a performance needs to be special to justify a three-hour-plus investment of time and attention. If Herreweghe's first recording did so by virtue of its sheer loveliness, this newcomer adds a couple of even more compelling elements: emotional immediacy and expressive intensity. Happy Anniversary, J.S.B.
--David Hurwitz, ClassicsToday.com

St. John Passion
You could spend many hours of listening and fill dozens of pages of text to expound the similarities, differences, felicities, inconsistencies, and relative merits of the many past and present recordings of Bach's St. John Passion. After all, we're dealing with a work that existed in at least four different versions in Bach's time and that today is performed from different stylistic points of view and using various editions. We usually hear some form of the original setting first presented in Leipzig in 1724, based on a partial-autograph score from 1739. This is known as the "first version" and it opens with one of Bach's grand choral movements "Herr, unser Herrscher". In Philipe Herreweghe's own "first" recording of this work with his Collegium Vocale Gent in 1987, he adopted this more-commonly performed version--and as carefully explained in the liner notes--also chose to use a female alto soloist for "subjective reasons" of timbre and expressive qualities.


Well, nearly 15 years later, Herreweghe has opted not only for the notably different "second" version (a revision that Bach produced in 1725, a year following the work's first performance) , but also seems to have found an ideal male alto in the person of countertenor extraordinaire Andreas Scholl. The immediate difference you hear is the absence of the original big chorus, which Bach replaced with the rather less ambitious chorale-based chorus "O Mensch, bewein dein Sünde groß" that he later used again in the St. Matthew Passion. Other differences concern substitution of several new arias for the original ones, and replacement of the final chorale "Ach Herr, laß dein lieb Engelein" with a more elaborate choral setting, "Christe, du Lamm Gottes".


Although there's really no question of choice here--if you like this work, you'll certainly want more than one of Bach's versions--this current set does offer certain advantages over its elder cousin. The playing here is more taut, articulation sharper, the rhythmic sense is more compelling, the energy of players and singers more vibrant. Even the tuning, which back in '87 was just a bit tenuous in spots (listen to the upper winds in the opening chorus), now is impeccable. The choral singing is equally lovely, strong, expressive, and well-balanced in both renditions and the soloists in each set are comparable both in their command of the textual drama and in their superior vocalism.


And it's hard to imagine anyone being disappointed with Scholl's intensely moving rendition of the aria "Es ist vollbracht" (It is accomplished), or indeed with any of his other contributions; his richly colored yet clear-ringing tone well-suits Bach's conception of these arias, both in their textual and instrumental context. Soprano Sibylla Rubens' voice in higher registers and at louder volume becomes too penetrating for my taste, but all of that is forgotten in her lovely rendition of "Zerfließe, mein Herze" near the end of Part Two. Certainly, the drama is all here--Herreweghe has refined his sense of pacing and really keeps things moving without giving the slightest sense of pushing or rushing his singers and players. Overall, you experience a tight, nicely projected piece of theatre that successfully manages, in Herreweghe's own words, to "conserve. . .the most complete religious serenity." The sound is just a bit less tangy and sharply detailed than is usual for Harmonia Mundi's productions with these forces in this repertoire, but a little extra boost in volume creates a satisfying, room-filling bloom.


If by chance you want to look elsewhere for your St. John experience, there are similarly recommendable (and almost identically-timed) recordings of the (more-or-less) 1724 version from Franz Brüggen (Philips), Andrew Parrott (Virgin), and John Eliot Gardiner (Archiv)--or, if you want an all-in-one package, you might try Helmuth Rilling's three-disc set with the Bach-Collegium Stuttgart (Hänssler) containing "the movements from all versions". But what you gain in completeness with Rilling you sacrifice in sound quality--trebly, overly bright, and a too-distant perspective. However, for my money, these two Herreweghe efforts make an appealing if not absolutely perfect set--and you won't find anything yet to compare with this superbly conceived and excitingly performed production of Bach's 1725 score. [1/17/2002]
--David Vernier, ClassicsToday.com

Mass In B Minor
"This recording may indeed be the best B minor Mass ever recorded, and that is saying a lot in a field where you can hardly throw a stone without hitting a great one... The period instruments are magnificent, and the 23-member choir sings with a loving tone quality that is impossible to get out of your head when all is over... This is... a reading to live with and by, one that you can turn to with confidence over and over again... The booklet presents a fourteen-part biography of the composer, and rounds out an utterly first class production." – Audiophile Audition [3/5/2007]

Motets
"Herreweghe is, above all, a choral conductor and he knows how to discipline a choir. The results here are often impressive with crystal-clear textures and predominantly fine ensemble and intonation. These virtues often result in splendidly resonant sonorities and sumptuously rich harmonic effects... I enjoyed the Hanover Boys' Choir performances but I feel that this new recording creates a more vivid reflection of these remarkable works. It is certainly an issue which I shall want to listen to many times over and it can be enthusiastically recommended. Excellent sound presentation." – Nicholas Anderson, Gramophone [12/1986]

Easter Oratorio
Once in while a recording comes along in which the performers, producers, and recording team get everything right. This is one of them. First issued in 1995, this production of Bach's Easter "oratorium" easily can claim supremacy among several very good alternatives. Largely cobbled from an earlier secular cantata for a duke's birthday, the music is some of Bach's most poignant while being alternately festive and meditative. There are no "roles" as we find in the Passions, no Evangelist-type recitatives, no chorales, and there's no real dramatic story line. Instead, we visit a particular scene--Peter, John, and the two Marys discover the empty tomb and contemplate its meaning. There are only two choruses, the first of which is substantial--and one of Bach's masterpieces--and there's an unusual two-movement (fast-slow) orchestral introduction. The rest consists of arias for soprano, alto, and tenor (one of the most beautiful tenor arias in all of music) and some of Bach's most skillfully written recitatives. The performances here are everything you could wish for, with sound that neither giveth nor taketh away, but rather just allows us to hear everything clearly and naturally.

--David Vernier, ClassicsToday.com

BWV 11
Another entry in Harmonia Mundi's ongoing Bach Edition, this recording from 1993 exemplifies both the consistently high standard of performance we've come to expect from Philippe Herreweghe and his Collegium Vocale and the astonishing musical variety and emotional/spiritual depth of Bach's vocal works. As usual in this series, the program reflects a theme, in this case the feast of Ascension, for which Bach wrote what proved to be his final oratorio (improperly catalogued as a cantata in the original edition of Bach's works) and at least three cantatas. The oratorio contains both original music and, as has recently been shown, several movements taken from cantatas no longer extant. It's a compelling and inexplicably underperformed work, far shorter than Bach's other oratorios, complete with some terrific orchestral music, two wonderful festive choruses, a tenor Evangelist narrator, a charming little duet for tenor and bass, and arias for soprano and alto.

--David Vernier, ClassicsToday.com

BWV 170, 54, & 35
"The Scholl/Herreweghe CD is distinguished by its marriage of beautiful sound and expressive intensity. The richly nuanced orchestral playing remains forceful throughout and Scholl imbues his beguiling voice with a fervent conviction..." -- BBC Music Magazine [5/1998]

BWV 56, 82, & 158
"Kooy must by now have appeared in more Bach cantata recordings than any other solo singer in history, and even in 1991 when these recordings were made he was an experienced Bach singer of immense authority. His performances of these soul-searching, inward-looking works are stamped with a level of technical command and sensitivity that renders more obvious gesture superfluous. This is masterly and utterly compelling singing." -- Brian Robins, FANFARE [7/2001]

BWV 12, 38 & 75

One of Bach's more magnificent extended choruses graces the cantata BWV 12, and another less substantial but no less impressive one dominates BWV 38. These works represent some of Bach's most profoundly affecting and musically sophisticated textual and emotional representations, the former an ideal evocation of "weeping and wailing" with its unmistakably vivid chromatic descending bass-line, lurching rhythm, and agonized melody (which Bach later re-used in his B minor Mass). The pungent, reedy sound of the oboe adds perfect color and character to the whole cantata, and of course, Bach's ingenious writing, especially the obbligato parts, lifts all three of these cantatas beyond the functional to the highest artistic and spiritual level.


The soloists here are all excellent, but alto Daniel Taylor and tenor Mark Padmore are particularly notable, the latter most especially for his Aus tiefer Not aria, "Ich höre mitten in den Leiden", whose melodic theme bears striking resemblance to the aria "Schließe mein Herze" from the Christmas Oratorio. Not unexpectedly, the choral work from Collegium Vocale Gent is expert--precise and full of energy and passion in every phrase--and the instrumental playing is exemplary. No one performs this repertoire better, and if you're looking for three of Bach's more emotionally rich, theologically "heavy", yet musically exhilarating cantatas, look no further. The sound is accordingly fine--room-filling, with natural-sounding voices and richly resonant instruments.
--David Vernier, ClassicsToday.com [4/14/2005]

BWV 27, 84, 95 & 161

It's supposed to be spring, but the snow is falling heavily outside, and, after an extraordinarily long winter the formerly abstract concept of depression is assuming a more personal presence with every passing minute. Then, you hear Dorothee Mields singing "Ich esse mit Freuden mein weniges Brot" (I eat my meager bread with joy), and somehow your dimmed spirit is lightened and uplifted--and you realize once again the transcendent power of Bach's music. (Perhaps it's no surprise that this cantata's theme is to be happy with what you have!) Even this practical, functional music can bring light and life to all who listen--and certainly also to those who sing and play it.

The cantatas featured on this program--first-rate performances all--span the years 1716 to 1727, and those who wish to explore changes in style or practice will have much to indulge their interest. But for the pure listener these four cantatas also offer tremendous variety of voices, instrumental color and texture, and plentiful examples of Bach's uniquely imagined and integrated melody and obbligato parts.

The three-section opening chorus of BWV 95, which joins two chorales by means of an almost oddly interrupting tenor recitative, is one of Bach's most curious, fascinating, unusual, and surprising cantata choruses--well worth hearing several times by itself; but also worth a repeat or two is Mields' tenderly sung "Valet will ich dir geben", her melody (which many church-goers will recognize as the tune to "All glory, laud, and honor"--in triple meter) accompanied by two oboes d'amore in one of those inimitable Bachian obbligatos.

Also notable are bass Thomas Bauer, his rich, confident voice particularly compelling in "Gute Nacht..." from BWV 27, tenor Hans Jörg Mammel in the difficult "Ach, schlage doch bald" aria and delicate "Welt! deine Lust ist Last!" recitative, and alto Matthew White in the poignant aria "Komm, du süße Todesstunde" (here the original Weimar version with two recorders). And by programming the earliest cantata last (BWV 161), we're left hearing one of Bach's more delightfully, perfectly scored choruses that makes something inside us dance every time we hear it. The sound is fittingly intimate but with plenty of body and resonance appropriate to bring out the natural qualities of instrumental and vocal timbres. Exceptional!

--David Vernier, ClassicsToday.com
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Works on This Recording

1.
Saint Matthew Passion, BWV 244 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Werner Güra (Tenor), Dietrich Henschel (Tenor), Andreas Scholl (Countertenor),
Ian Bostridge (Tenor), Sibylla Rubens (Soprano), Franz-Joseph Selig (Bass)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale,  Ghent Collegium Vocale Orchestra,  Cantate Domino Chorus
Period: Baroque 
Written: Circa 1727; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 1998 
2.
Saint John Passion, BWV 245 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Sebastian Noack (Bass), Sibylla Rubens (Soprano), Michael Volle (Baritone),
Dominik Wörner (Bass), Malcolm Bennett (Tenor), Andreas Scholl (Countertenor),
Mark Padmore (Tenor), Cécile Kempenaers (Soprano)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1724; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 04/2001 
Venue:  Stolberg Hall, Cologne, Germany 
Length: 110 Minutes 51 Secs. 
3.
Singet Dem Hern, BWV 225 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale,  La Chapelle Royale Paris
Date of Recording: 11/1985 
Venue:  Ghent, Belgium 
Length: 13 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: German 
4.
Der Geist hilft unser Schwachheit auf, BWV 226 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale,  La Chapelle Royale Paris
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1729; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 11/1985 
Length: 8 Minutes 19 Secs. 
Language: German 
5.
Jesu, meine Freude, BWV 227 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale,  La Chapelle Royale Paris
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1723; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 11/1985 
Venue:  Ghent, Belgium 
Length: 21 Minutes 30 Secs. 
Language: German 
6.
Fürchte dich nicht, ich bin bei dir, BWV 228 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale,  La Chapelle Royale Paris
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1726; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 11/1985 
Venue:  Ghent, Belgium 
Length: 8 Minutes 31 Secs. 
Language: German 
7.
Komm, Jesu, komm!, BWV 229 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale,  La Chapelle Royale Paris
Period: Baroque 
Written: circa 1725-1749; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 11/1985 
Length: 8 Minutes 52 Secs. 
Language: German 
8.
Lobet den Herrn, alle Heiden, BWV 230 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale,  La Chapelle Royale Paris
Period: Baroque 
Written: circa 1723-1729; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 11/1985 
Venue:  Ghent, Belgium 
Length: 6 Minutes 28 Secs. 
Language: German 
9.
Mass in B minor, BWV 232 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Christoph Prégardien (Tenor), Hanno Müller-Brachmann (Bass Baritone),
Andreas Scholl (Countertenor), Véronique Gens (Soprano), Johannette Zomer (Soprano)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Collegium Vocale,  Ghent Collegium Vocale Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1747-49; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 07/1996 
Length: 109 Minutes 22 Secs. 
10.
Magnificat in D major, BWV 243 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Barbara Schlick (Soprano), Gérard Lesne (Countertenor),
Howard Crook (Tenor), Agnès Mellon (Soprano)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  La Chapelle Royale Paris,  Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: circa 1728-1731; Leipzig, Germany 
Length: 28 Minutes 16 Secs. 
11.
Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott, BWV 80 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Gérard Lesne (Countertenor), Barbara Schlick (Soprano),
Howard Crook (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  La Chapelle Royale Paris,  Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1744; Leipzig, Germany 
Length: 24 Minutes 50 Secs. 
12.
Liebster Gott, wenn werd' ich sterben?, BWV 8 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Mark Padmore (Tenor), Deborah York (Soprano),
Ingeborg Danz (Alto)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1724; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 02/1998 
Venue:  Baptist Church, Haarlem, Netherlands 
Length: 18 Minutes 31 Secs. 
Language: German 
13.
Mit Fried und Freud ich fahr dahin, BWV 125 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Deborah York (Soprano), Ingeborg Danz (Alto), Mark Padmore (Tenor),
Peter Kooy (Bass)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1725; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 02/1998 
Venue:  Baptist Church, Haarlem, Netherlands 
Length: 22 Minutes 33 Secs. 
Language: German 
14.
Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz?, BWV 138 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Deborah York (Soprano), Mark Padmore (Tenor), Ingeborg Danz (Alto),
Peter Kooy (Bass)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1723; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 02/1998 
Venue:  Baptist Church, Haarlem, Netherlands 
Length: 17 Minutes 11 Secs. 
Language: German 
15.
Magnificat in E flat major, BWV 243a by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Carolyn Sampson (Soprano), Ingeborg Danz (Alto), Mark Padmore (Tenor),
Sebastian Noack (Bass)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1723; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 12/2002 
Venue:  The Arsenal, Metz, France 
Length: 34 Minutes 10 Secs. 
16.
Easter Oratorio, BWV 249 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Kai Wessel (Countertenor), James Taylor (Tenor),
Barbara Schlick (Soprano)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale,  Ghent Collegium Vocale Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1732-1735; Leipzig, Germany 
17.
O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort, BWV 20 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Ingeborg Danz (Alto), Jan Kobow (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale,  Ghent Collegium Vocale Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1724; Leipzig, Germany 
18.
Ach Gott, vom Himmel sieh' darein, BWV 2 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Ingeborg Danz (Alto), Jan Kobow (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale,  Ghent Collegium Vocale Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1724; Leipzig, Germany 
19.
Es ist ein trotzig und verzagt Ding um aller Menschen Herze, BWV 176 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Johannette Zomer (Soprano), Peter Kooy (Bass), Ingeborg Danz (Alto)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale,  Ghent Collegium Vocale Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1725; Leipzig, Germany 
20.
Lobet Gott in seinen Reichen, BWV 11 "Ascension Oratorio" by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Christoph Prégardien (Tenor), Barbara Schlick (Soprano), Catherine Patriasz (Alto),
Peter Kooy (Bass)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale,  Ghent Collegium Vocale Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1735; Leipzig, Germany 
21.
Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen, BWV 12 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Daniel Taylor (Countertenor), Peter Kooy (Bass), Carolyn Sampson (Soprano),
Mark Padmore (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1714; Weimar, Germany 
22.
Aus tiefer Not schrei'ich zu dir, BWV 38 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Daniel Taylor (Countertenor), Peter Kooy (Bass), Carolyn Sampson (Soprano),
Mark Padmore (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1724; Leipzig, Germany 
23.
Die Elenden sollen essen, dass sie satt werden, BWV 75 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Daniel Taylor (Countertenor), Peter Kooy (Bass), Carolyn Sampson (Soprano),
Mark Padmore (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1723; Cöthen, Germany 
24.
Wer weiss, wie nahe mir mein Ende, BWV 27 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Thomas E. Bauer (Bass), Dorothee Mields (Soprano), Matthew White (Countertenor),
Hans Jörg Mammel (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1726; Leipzig, Germany 
25.
Ich bin vergnügt mit meinem Glücke, das mir der liebe Gott beschert, BWV 84 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Thomas E. Bauer (Bass), Dorothee Mields (Soprano), Matthew White (Countertenor),
Hans Jörg Mammel (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1727; Leipzig, Germany 
26.
Christus, der ist mein Leben, BWV 95 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Thomas E. Bauer (Bass), Dorothee Mields (Soprano), Matthew White (Countertenor),
Hans Jörg Mammel (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1723; Leipzig, Germany 
27.
Komm, du süsse Todesstunde, BWV 161 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Thomas E. Bauer (Bass), Matthew White (Countertenor), Dorothee Mields (Soprano),
Hans Jörg Mammel (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1715; Cöthen, Germany 
28.
Ich hatte viel Bekümmernis, BWV 21 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Barbara Schlick (Soprano), Howard Crook (Tenor), Peter Harvey (Bass),
Gérard Lesne (Countertenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale,  La Chapelle Royale Paris
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1714; Cöthen, Germany 
29.
Am Abend aber desselbigen Sabbats, BWV 42 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gérard Lesne (Countertenor), Barbara Schlick (Soprano), Howard Crook (Tenor),
Peter Kooy (Bass)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale,  La Chapelle Royale Paris
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1725; Leipzig, Germany 
30.
Schwingt freudig euch empor, BWV 36 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Sibylla Rubens (Soprano), Peter Kooy (Bass), Christoph Prégardien (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1731; Leipzig, Germany 
31.
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 61 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Sibylla Rubens (Soprano), Peter Kooy (Bass), Christoph Prégardien (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1714; Cöthen, Germany 
32.
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 62 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Sarah Connolly (Mezzo Soprano), Sibylla Rubens (Soprano),
Christoph Prégardien (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1724; Leipzig, Germany 
33.
Selig ist der Mann, der die Anfechtung erdulet, BWV 57 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Vasiljka Jezovsek (Soprano)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Collegium Vocale
Written: 1725 
34.
Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ, BWV 91 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Dorothee Mields (Soprano), Ingeborg Danz (Alto),
Mark Padmore (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1724; Leipzig, Germany 
35.
Unser Mund sei voll Lachens, BWV 110 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Sarah Connolly (Mezzo Soprano), Peter Kooy (Bass), Vasiljka Jezovsek (Soprano),
Mark Padmore (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1725; Leipzig, Germany 
36.
Christum wir sollen loben schon, BWV 121 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Dorothee Mields (Soprano), Mark Padmore (Tenor),
Ingeborg Danz (Alto)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1724; Leipzig, Germany 
37.
Das neugeborne Kindelein, BWV 122 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Sarah Connolly (Mezzo Soprano), Peter Kooy (Bass), Vasiljka Jezovsek (Soprano),
Mark Padmore (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1724; Leipzig, Germany 
38.
Ich freue mich in dir, BWV 133 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Dorothee Mields (Soprano), Mark Padmore (Tenor),
Ingeborg Danz (Alto)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1724; Leipzig, Germany 
39.
Vergnügte Ruh, beliebte Seelenlust, BWV 170 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Andreas Scholl (Countertenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1726; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 07/1997 
Length: 20 Minutes 48 Secs. 
40.
Widerstehe doch der Sünde, BWV 54 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Andreas Scholl (Countertenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1714; Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 07/1997 
Length: 11 Minutes 3 Secs. 
41.
Geist und Seele wird verwirret, BWV 35 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Andreas Scholl (Countertenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1726; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 07/1997 
Length: 25 Minutes 1 Secs. 
42.
Ich will den Kreuzstab gerne tragen, BWV 56 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  La Chapelle Royale Chorus Paris
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1726; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1991 
Length: 18 Minutes 21 Secs. 
43.
Ich habe genug, BWV 82 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  La Chapelle Royale Chorus Paris
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1727; Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1991 
Length: 22 Minutes 24 Secs. 
44.
Der Friede sei mit dir, BWV 158 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  La Chapelle Royale Chorus Paris
Period: Baroque 
Written: after 1723; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/1991 
Length: 20 Minutes 18 Secs. 
45.
Wir danken dir, Gott, BWV 29 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Ingeborg Danz (Alto), Deborah York (Soprano),
Mark Padmore (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1731; Leipzig, Germany 
46.
Preise, Jerusalem, den Herrn, BWV 119 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Ingeborg Danz (Alto), Deborah York (Soprano),
Mark Padmore (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1723; Leipzig, Germany 
47.
Gott, mann lobet dich in der Stille, BWV 120 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Ingeborg Danz (Alto), Deborah York (Soprano),
Mark Padmore (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1728-1729; Leipzig, Germany 
48.
Lass, Fürstin, lass noch einen Strahl, BWV 198 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Charles Brett (Countertenor), Howard Crook (Tenor),
Ingrid Schmithüsen (Soprano)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1727; Leipzig, Germany 
49.
Jesu, der du meine Seele, BWV 78 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Howard Crook (Tenor), Charles Brett (Countertenor), Ingrid Schmithüsen (Soprano),
Peter Kooy (Bass)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1724; Leipzig, Germany 
50.
Tönet, ihr Pauken! Erschallet Trompeten!, BWV 214 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Mark Padmore (Tenor), Carolyn Sampson (Soprano), Ingeborg Danz (Alto),
Peter Kooy (Bass)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1733; Leipzig, Germany 
51.
Vereingte Zwietracht der wechselnden Saiten, BWV 207 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Peter Kooy (Bass), Ingeborg Danz (Alto), Deborah York (Soprano),
Mark Padmore (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ghent Collegium Vocale
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1726; Germany 

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