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Saint-saëns: Piano Concertos 1-5 / Rogé, Dutoit


Release Date: 05/16/1995 
Label:  London/Decca Double Decker Catalog #: 443865   Spars Code: ADD 
Composer:  Camille Saint-Saëns
Performer:  Pascal Rogé
Conductor:  Charles Dutoit
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia OrchestraRoyal Philharmonic OrchestraLondon Philharmonic Orchestra
Number of Discs: 2 
Recorded in: Stereo 
Length: 2 Hours 21 Mins. 

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Notes and Editorial Reviews

This set is offered at a special price: 2 discs for the price of 1. This set is offered at a special price: 2 discs for the price of 1. Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Concerto for Piano no 1 in D major, Op. 17 by Camille Saint-Saëns
Performer:  Pascal Rogé (Piano)
Conductor:  Charles Dutoit
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1858; France 
Date of Recording: 07/1979 
Length: 29 Minutes 31 Secs. 
2.
Concerto for Piano no 2 in G minor, Op. 22 by Camille Saint-Saëns
Performer:  Pascal Rogé (Piano)
Conductor:  Charles Dutoit
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1868; France 
Date of Recording: 07/1978 
Length: 24 Minutes 10 Secs. 
3.
Concerto for Piano no 3 in E flat major, Op. 29 by Camille Saint-Saëns
Performer:  Pascal Rogé (Piano)
Conductor:  Charles Dutoit
Orchestra/Ensemble:  London Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1869; France 
Date of Recording: 04/1980 
Length: 30 Minutes 9 Secs. 
4.
Concerto for Piano no 4 in C minor, Op. 44 by Camille Saint-Saëns
Performer:  Pascal Rogé (Piano)
Conductor:  Charles Dutoit
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philharmonia Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1875; France 
Date of Recording: 07/1979 
Length: 26 Minutes 18 Secs. 
5.
Concerto for Piano no 5 in F major, Op. 103 "Egyptian" by Camille Saint-Saëns
Performer:  Pascal Rogé (Piano)
Conductor:  Charles Dutoit
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1896; France 
Date of Recording: 07/1978 
Length: 28 Minutes 58 Secs. 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 A Steady, Consistant Collection from Roge and Dut October 22, 2014 By Tony Engleton See All My Reviews "10-22-2014 This is a collection of the 5 Piano Concerti of the Frenchman Camille Saint-Saens along with the silky, smooth Montreal Symphony orchestra in recordings of an unknown year, but is fine sound on Decca records spread over two luscious discs. There is a fairly good enclosed booklet with some vital info, but not the year of the project. Assisting in the accompaniment are the Philhrmonia, London Phil. and the Royal Phil., all under the baton of Charles Dutoit, and the total 2 CD running time is a nice one hour and 40 minutes, minus 2 seconds. For those of you with a carousel CD player, this is a real treat as you can just sit back and traverse the composer's entire Concertante creations for the keyboard. There are no fillers in this set, but that's ok with me. The individual concerti are recorded and packaged in chronological order, allowing a listener to travel with SS as he wrote these pieces, starting at age 23 up to his 61st year, about 25 years before his death in 1921. Artistic Impressions First up is the Piano Concerto in D major, Op. 17daTING FROM 1858 when SS was only 23 Y/O. A child prodigy ,who for me, hasn't received the attention he deserves, he was also an accomplished organist and conductor, and live a long and fruitful life from 1835-1921,an astounding 86 years. Still a much sought after authority even as an octogenarian, he remained the dean of the French school of composition and a valued advisor on all things artistic, kind of like an elderly Mendelssohn. The D major is a highly melodic, lyrical work of much beauty, this work opens with a six note motto theme in the solo French Horn, and reappears often in orchestral form through this initial 12:26. The overall tone of the Andante--Allegro assai is grand, sweeping and noble, even heroic in stature, I liked it immediately upon first hearing, which is as of this writing. I am quite familiar with Concerti numbers 2, 4 and 5, somewhat, but this early piece was a pleasant surprise for me. the music and the playing is frolicsome, light and bubbly, and sparkles nicely, alternating between the big and the tingling. Also, the conversation between the soloist and the Philhrmonia is balanced and consistently interesting. Running a healthy 26:36, this First offering gave the world a good concerto, but not a great one. Obviously, it trails the premiere concerti of Tchaikovsky, Beethoven, and most significantly of them all, the grand and important b minor of Johannes Brahms, but then SS is no Beethoven, or Brahms for that matter, and neither is, in my view, the entire French world of composition. they seem more interested in the charming, coy, clever and truly light-weighted form of expressions, with some notable exceptions being Franck, with the occasional great work of Faure, Debussy and Ravel. As one can see, the French seemed to flourish in the late Romantic, early contemporary eras with the last two, Debussy and Maurice Ravel. But, the great Romantic period from about 1750 through 1900 or so, lacks much as that time was almost the sole property if the Austro-Germanic culture, with the Russian, English and Slavic world emerging for added flavor and spice. WHY??? I cannot understand other than the depth, power, and profundity of the French neighbors went largely unchallenged. And so, I have always approached SS and his fellow French with a certain degree of skepticism and wariness. Still, for the well rounded "complete" composer, Camille Saint-Saens is amongst their best, and I can't say he ever wrote anything really poorly. Far from it, each of his creations seems well proportioned, balanced and of much interest, yes, but just not on the same level as the Germanic ideas. After an engaging beginning, this D Major moves into a fairly tedious Andante sostenuto quasi Adagio of 10:28 which taxed my concentration a bit. Oh, it's ok, but little else, borrowing material from the opening section, but it never really interested me. Too predictable and even mundane, I was glad to reach the lively "Allegro con fuoco" and it does have a degree of fire to it. This fast, sparkling 6:36 movement lacks only a longer duration as I wanted more of it, but alas, it's over much too soon, but is the best part of this youthful opus. Roge and Dutoit really play it with zest, joy and a certain regal nature I find in Tchaikovsky frequently, but more so than in SS. Overall, a fine first Concerto played beautifully and with clarity and flare. I liked it, especially the finale. A solid 4.0 for missers Roge and Dutoit. The 2nd Piano Concerto is in g minor and is maybe his best, next to the 4th, in c minor. the signature reading is, to be frank, by Cecille Licad and Andre Previn, with even more lyricism and passion, but this one is also rather fine. Unfortuneately, I don't currently have a recording of that quintet of Concertante pieces but I do have J.P.Collard's set with Previn. What I do own is a group of SS's best concertante pieces featuring the Cello Con. #1 with Ma, the violin concerto #3 with Cho-Lang Lin, and the 2nd Piano Concerto with Miss Licad, all on a Sony CD in fine sound, which I grabbed for abut a Buck, and have enjoyed as I learn the Vn Con. better. roge's reading of the PC #2 is passionate, dreamy, and strongly played with force, fire and much skill. A very close runner up to Licad, I recommend it wholeheartedly with a glowing 4.5 rating. If I were a pianist, this is how I'd do this masterpiece of the literature, almost note for note. The tempo is perfect, the emphasis on the keys thoroughly planned and executed. Not much else to say other than GET IT!! The Piano Concerto #3 is an E Flat Major affair of little real interest for me, I breezed through it without any real pause to see if I had missed something significant. The answer was no, so it just occupies a numerical position and little else. Too bad, but not all these Concerti are that good, still the really good ones, numbers 1, 2, 4, and 5 outnumbered the mundane 3rd by a wide margin. Still, this total 2 CD package is well worth collecting, and now to the 4th. The c-minor #4 was written in 1875, as SS was 40 years old. It is a pretty good work as are all his minor keyed concerti, oddly enough, but this c-minor composition carries much feeling and reflection with it, I have always liked it, but not at the level of the #2, which I see as being rather senscical. I will say this, inn defense of the 3rd, and that is that it's finale is, like nearly all these works, pretty good, big, sweeping and definitively sculpted to 'Sound:" like a Fianale should sound. But, it's too little too late and the 4th is clerarly a better work. The shortest of the 5, the #4 is a two movement offering, unusual for it's time, but effective. Added to that, the structure of a pair of Allegros, one a moderato, the other a vivace seems to work ok, even with a wisp of a total time of a mere 23:18, Roge, Dutoit and the Philharmonia dsh it off with effective dispatch and I liked it still, though I rarely have heard it. ********************NEED TO FINISH****************************" Report Abuse
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