WGBH Radio WGBH Radio theclassicalstation.org

Lumieres - Music Of The Enlightenment [30-CD Set]


Release Date: 10/01/2011 
Label:  Harmonia Mundi   Catalog #: 2908601  
Composer:  Wolfgang Amadeus MozartChristoph W. GluckJean-Philippe RameauGeorge Frideric Handel,   ... 
Performer:  Kobie van RensburgVéronique GensPatrizia CiofiMarie McLaughlin,   ... 
Conductor:  René JacobsWilliam ChristieDaniel ReussPhilippe Herreweghe,   ... 
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Concerto CologneCologne Collegium VocaleBerlin RIAS Chamber Chorus,   ... 
Number of Discs: 30 
In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  
On sale! $74.98
CD:  $62.99
In Stock



Notes and Editorial Reviews

The 18th century is probably the most extraordinary period of transformation Europe has known since antiquity. Political upheavals kept pace with the innumerable inventions and discoveries of the age; every sector of the arts and of intellectual and material life was turned upside down. Between the end of the reign of Louis XIV and the revolution of 1789, music in its turn underwent a radical mutation that struck at the very heart of a well-established musical language. In this domain too, we are all children of the Age of Enlightenment: our conception of music and the way we ‘consume’ it still follows in many respects the agenda set by the 18th century. And it is not entirely by chance that harmonia mundi has chosen to offer you in 2011 a Read more survey of this musical revolution which, without claiming to be exhaustive, will enable you to grasp the principal outlines of musical creation between the twilight of the Baroque and the dawn of Romanticism.

29 CDs plus 1 CD-Rom to discover the music of the 18th Century!
COMPLETE & UNCUT 3 operas and 1 oratorio
French harpsichord music
The Twilight of the Baroque Oratorio
The History of the Concerto
From Sinfonia to Symphony
Opera : tragédie lyrique, Gluck’s Reform & the Mozartian Opera
‘A Tre’: From the trio sonata to the Piano trio
The Classical Sonata
The birth of the String quartet…

• Over 33 hours of music, 80 cornerstones of classical music in deluxe packaging


Reviews of some of the original recordings that make up this set:

Beethoven's late string quartets
"Here in the late quartets we have playing from the Tokyo Quartet that is full-bodied, perfectly balanced and blended, incisive and undivided in attack and release, rich in tone, smooth in bowing, precise in pitch, judicious in tempos, and observant of repeats, dynamics, and expression markings. And all of this is now captured by Harmonia Mundi’s engineers in an acoustic space that provides air around the players and places them in proper perspective.


The performance bar for Beethoven’s string quartets is very high, and while I shall resist the temptation to say that the Tokyo Quartet, at least in the late quartets, has raised the bar even higher, I will say that these readings are about as high as the bar has thus far risen. This set will not replace other favorites—the Emerson, Berg, Endellion, Alexander, Italiano, Cleveland, and Takács quartets—but it will proudly join them. This gets a five-star recommendation."

-- Jerry Dubins, Fanfare

Mozart's Le Nozze di Figaro
Much like his Cosi fan tutte of a couple of years ago, René Jacobs here gives us a "Nozze" that's so vibrant as to be practically visible. The give-and-take in the recitatives is timed brilliantly to real speech patterns, the singers whisper conspiratorily when needed (the asides sound like real asides--a very difficult effect to create on disc), and the ensembles have a true sense of spontaneity.


In the accompanying booklet Jacobs addresses the questions of tempo, recitative, and continuo, not to mention structural and dramatic reasons for including Basilio's and Marcellina's arias in the last act, which are persuasive and insightful. Accordingly, we learn of Mozart's fondness for quick tempos, the need for appoggiaturas, the search for apt ornamentation, and more. In fact, Jacobs' tempos are not particularly fast by après-Böhm-and-Karajan standards (the very end of the second-act finale is more rigid and clear than it normally is), appoggiaturas abound and sound just right, and the ornamentation is plentiful and, although a bit jarring at first, very nice indeed. The prominent pianoforte, diddling away with musical commentary in recitatives, makes it almost another character, and it can be heard underpinning arias as well. Some listeners may find it intrusive; I think it's fascinating. (Just before Susanna's last-act "Deh vieni, non tardar", it plays a bit of "Un moto di gioia", a substitute aria for Susanna--an "in" joke if ever there were one.)

The performances are exciting. Simon Keenlyside's Count is simply the best on disc; he manages to be lascivious and angry without ever going into mustache-twirling caricature (the way, say, Fischer-Dieskau tended to), and he's the only singer I've ever heard who gets through every note, every turn, every trill of the third-act aria unscathed, even victorious. His Countess, Veronique Gens, at times seems a bit vocally out of sorts, but she presents a remarkably sympathetic figure, with sadness and girlish desire for fun in equal measure.


Patrizia Ciofi's Susanna is beautifully sung--spicy and knowing; she's a perfect foil for the somewhat serious Figaro of Lorenzo Regazzo. He has a rich voice and all the notes for the soon-to-be-wed Figaro, and he sounds properly non-plussed by the Bartolo/Marcellina announcement. Angelika Kirchschlager's Cherubino is boyish and impetuous, a truly romance-stricken character. Marie McLaughlin makes a younger-than-usual Marcellina, Antonio Abete flavors Bartolo well, and Kobie van Rensburg is colorful as both Basilio and Don Curzio.


As suggested, Jacobs is the true star. By keeping the cast interested and lively and by bringing out the razzing in the winds, the blare of the horns (in Figaro's fourth-act aria particularly, although they seem to be coming from a different, distant acoustic), the sharp attack of the strings, and a timpani thwap that punctuates just as it ought to, he brilliantly realizes the comedy of the text and music. This is top of the line. [4/12/2004]

-- Robert Levine, ClassicsToday.com

Gluck's Orfeo & Euridice
Would it be too bold to say that this version of Orfeo & Euridice is the most moving, beautiful, and simply right in a very crowded (and worthy) market? Listen and believe: Neither stinting on overt theatrics nor pathos, René Jacobs has managed to remove Orfeo from its exquisite shelf, normally labeled "reform opera", and present it as a drama never previously heard or discussed, and therefore without its baggage. He and his sublime players lunge into the overture at great speed and with tremendous energy and thrust, percussion thwapping, truly preparing the audience for an "event". The sad opening chorus, with Orfeo's sadder interpolations of Euridice's name, therefore affects us even more--the contrast is palpable--and the entire opening scene, lament after lament, is heartbreaking. Orfeo begins to rail against the gods and his sorrow turns to rage. At every turn, mezzo Bernarda Fink finds the right tone for the hero; her use of shading and dynamics is masterly. Amore, in the person of Maria Cristina Kiehr, is innocent and white-voiced (if also tempting) and gives Orfeo hope; his confusion grows as he accepts the challenge. The infernal start of the second act is ice-cold rather than boiling hot, with Gluck's dissonances underlined with trepidation as the chorus warns Orfeo. Their dialogue is a true dialogue; Orfeo is steadfast, and the chorus retreats, pianissimo, to the distant sound of thunder as Orfeo enters Hell.

I won't take the rest of the opera step-by-step, but suffice it to say that the Elysian Fields music never has sounded so lovely or so serene, and Orfeo's reaction to its serenity never has seemed so honest and relieved. And so it goes--each scene comes vividly to life, each situation rings true. The playing of the woodwinds is ethereal, almost unreal, as calming as the monsters' music was disturbing. The couple is reunited. For once the exchange between them at the start of Act 4 seems like a genuine predicament (Euridice nags almost as much as Desdemona) and it's easy to see why this Orfeo can't resist his Euridice, so vivid is Veronica Cangemi's way with the text, so sweet and convincing her pleading. And Jacobs' rhythmic forward propulsion in their duet adds urgency. When Orfeo does look back and Euridice disappears, our hero is beside himself, leaning more on chest voice than ever before in the performance. "Che faro..." is breathtaking in its simple sadness. Throughout, startlingly, Jacobs allows his singers to embellish the vocal line somewhat (horror of horrors, true Gluckians may feel), and in the lament the generous use of appoggiaturas underscores the character's grief. What more can I say? This is a divine performance, on a par with Jacobs' ground-breaking, fascinating Cosi fan tutte of a couple of years back. If you own only one recording of this opera, this should be it. And if you have a favorite, I bet this one will either replace it or tie it for first.

-- Robert Levine, ClassicsToday.com

Rameau's Castor et Pollux
Rameau’s reputation as one of the greatest French composers of the late Baroque rests chiefly on his operas, with their colourful orchestrations, dramatic choruses and subtle blends of aria and expressive recitative. These attributes are already to the fore in Castor et Pollux, his second completed tragédie en musique, which was first staged in 1737.

Though Rameau prepared a shorter, much-revised version in 1754, it is the original that is performed here, complete with its enchanting allegorical prologue and leisurely procession of dances, airs and set-piece spectacles.

Though his pacing isn’t very dramatic – and definitely flags in Act IV – Rameau does provide a wonderful variety of music: notably, Télaire’s tragic ‘Tristes apprêts’ in Act I, a thrilling trio plus a chorus of irate demons in Act III, and Castor and Télaire’s anguished dialogue in Act V, which closes with a ceremonial flourish – Jupiter descending on an eagle amidst much orchestral thunder.

William Christie and Les Arts Florissants are outstanding exponents of this repertory. The playing is superb and the singing, from principals through to chorus, is magnificent. Castor et Pollux may not be Rameau’s most compelling opera but it couldn’t receive a more brilliant or persuasive account.

-- Graham Lock, BBC Music Magazine

Handel's Solomon
Well, it's happened again--another reference-recording shake-up. This new Solomon from Daniel Reuss, the RIAS Kammerchor, and Akademie für Alte Musik Berlin is now the one to own, and unless you're a collector of these things, the only one you'll need. And that's not to diminish the achievements of Gardiner or of the recent McGegan live production on Carus, but this performance and recording are so dynamic and vibrant, so present and powerful that you can't help but be swept up in the sheer glory and grandeur of one of Handel's greatest scores. Yes, Gardiner's 1984 Philips recording remains impressive, especially for the clarity and detail of the orchestra and the consistently strong, committed performances by all concerned; but this one is even more magnificent, the soloists just a notch more attuned to the drama, while the chorus and orchestra go beyond the performance of a series of "numbers" to really inhabit the scenes and effectively impart the character and mood of the story.

Sarah Connolly, who's already made her mark as a Handel singer, here an alto, elsewhere a mezzo (type Q10090 and Q8177 in Search Reviews), is one of the more commanding, darker-voiced Solomons on disc (the part was written for a mezzo), and she delivers the role with a confident, thoughtful, respectfully theatrical air that's always mindful of the character while fully exploiting Handel's abundant opportunities for purely lovely musical expression. And speaking of "lovely musical expression", Susan Gritton's "Beneath the vine, or fig-tree's shade", near the end of Act 2, is among the most beautifully sung Handel arias you'll ever hear, a show-stopping performance that you'll just have to repeat once or twice before moving on to the following chorus.

All the while, Daniel Reuss shows his affinity for this score by his absolutely "right" management of tempo and flow, of rhythmic cadence, of sonority and dynamic gradation. The contrasts--between, say, the aforementioned "Beneath the vine...", one of Handel's heart-rending gems, and the work's final, rousing chorus--are real and purposeful. The choruses--and these are some of Handel's finest--are properly inflected and sung with requisite technical discipline joined with the sort of buoyant, open-hearted spirit that's bound up in nearly everything Handel wrote, but that's rarely so affectingly realized. The same must be said of this excellent orchestra's performance, and it's all complemented by ideally balanced, vibrant, room-filling sound. This is one of those recordings that from the opening moments assures you that you won't be going anywhere--it's that good, it's that compelling, and it's absolutely essential.

-- David Vernier, ClassicsToday.com

Haydn Symphonies
"I loved this disc. Jacobs and his crew go absolutely crazy in the "Oxford" Symphony, particularly its finale, taken faster than even the excellent Freiburgers can comfortably play it, and if some of the rhythmic definition and textural clarity fall by the wayside, well, who cares? Haydn's wig would have hit the floor if he could have heard it, that's for sure."

-- David Hurwitz, ClassicsToday.com

"The Freiburg Baroque Orchestra plays fabulously, with outstanding contributions from Karl Kaiser (flute), Petra Millejans (violin), and the two horn players. With respect to these latter instruments in particular, so often period players make a fetish out of producing stopped tones more appropriate to the kazoo--but listen to the rich, lovely sounds that principal horn Teunis van der Zwart makes at the first movement recapitulation of Symphony No. 6. There ought to be a Romantic quality to all fine horn playing, nowhere more so than in classical period works where the instrument's association with the hunt is never far from the surface.

But there's much more to enjoy than noble-toned horns. Here's one conductorless band that plans its performances on a scale larger than most standard orchestras manage. Even with relatively small forces they play with a big dynamic range, and no mean sense of drama--check out the operatic slow movement of No. 7, with its very vocally expressive opening instrumental recitative. Tempos are generally swift but always are chosen to give the players the room they need to phrase and characterize the music to maximum effect, and Harmonia Mundi affords the ensemble ideally balanced, warmly detailed sound. Sadly, recordings of this music come and go, but let's hope this one sticks around long enough for music lovers to discover just how wonderful it is."

-- David Hurwitz, ClassicsToday.com

Dauvergne's Les Troqueurs
This delightful trifle offers a fascinating glimpse of French opera in the declining years of the Baroque. It is not so much a homage to Italian taste as a near complete capitulation to it. The result is melodious, pacey and, with a nod to the French manner, distinctively orchestrated. This is an elegant performance, though not without blemish; the singing is well characterised and, on the whole, consistently pleasing. An enticing issue.

-- Jan Smaczny, BBC Music Magazine

Telemann's Concerto "Die Relinge"
"The centerpiece (as well as pièce de résistance) of this program is Telemann's recently discovered violin concerto in A subtitled "Les Rainettes". While the first movement begins safely enough, the abrupt whining pitch of soloist Midori Seiler's violin soon interjects, her instrument purporting to allude to (according to the notes) a croaking frog though ultimately sounding more like a diffuse air raid siren. This auspicious entry begins one of the most imaginatively styled programmatic displays this side of Biber--and once heard, this grand concerto will not soon be forgotten."

--John Greene, ClassicsToday.com
Read less

Works on This Recording

1. Le nozze di Figaro, K 492 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Kobie van Rensburg (Tenor), Véronique Gens (Soprano), Patrizia Ciofi (Soprano),
Marie McLaughlin (Soprano), Antonio Abete (Bass), Nicolau De Figueiredo (Piano),
Nuria Rial (Soprano), Lorenzo Regazzo (Bass), Simon Keenlyside (Baritone),
Angelika Kirchschlager (Mezzo Soprano)
Conductor:  René Jacobs
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Concerto Cologne,  Cologne Collegium Vocale
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Vienna, Austria 
2. Orfeo ed Euridice by Christoph W. Gluck
Performer:  Veronica Cangemi (Soprano), Maria Cristina Kiehr (Soprano), Bernarda Fink (Mezzo Soprano)
Conductor:  René Jacobs
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin RIAS Chamber Chorus,  Freiburg Baroque Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1762/1774; Vienna, Austria 
Language: Italian 
3. Castor et Pollux by Jean-Philippe Rameau
Performer:  Sophie Daneman (Soprano), Jérôme Corréas (Bass Baritone), Agnès Mellon (Soprano),
Howard Crook (Tenor), Véronique Gens (Soprano), Adrian Brand (Tenor),
René Schirrer (Bass), René Schirrer (Baritone), Claire Brua (Soprano),
Sandrine Piau (Soprano), Mark Padmore (Countertenor), Jean-Claude Sarragosse (Bass)
Conductor:  William Christie
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Les Arts Florissants
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1737; Paris, France 
Date of Recording: 09/1992 
Length: 173 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Language: French 
4. Solomon, HWV 67 by George Frideric Handel
Performer:  David Wilson-Johnson (Bass), Susan Gritton (Soprano), Mark Padmore (Tenor),
Carolyn Sampson (Soprano), Sarah Connolly (Alto)
Conductor:  Daniel Reuss
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin RIAS Chamber Chorus,  Academy for Ancient Music Berlin
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1749; London, England 
5. Symphony no 9 in D minor, Op. 125 "Choral" by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Melanie Diener (Soprano), Petra Lang (Mezzo Soprano), Endrik Wottrich (Tenor),
Dietrich Henschel (Baritone)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  La Chapelle Royale Paris,  Collegium Vocale,  Champs-Élysées Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1822-1824; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 10/1998 
Venue:  Live  Great Hall, Arsenal, Metz, France 
Length: 62 Minutes 29 Secs. 
Language: German 
6. Symphony no 6 in D major, H 1 no 6 "Le Matin" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Petra Müllejans
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Freiburg Baroque Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: ?1761; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
7. Symphony no 7 in C major, H 1 no 7 "Le Midi" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Petra Müllejans
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Freiburg Baroque Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1761; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
8. Symphony no 92 in G major, H 1 no 92 "Oxford" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  René Jacobs
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Freiburg Baroque Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1789; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
9. Les troqueurs by Antoine Dauvergne
Performer:  Marie Saint-Palais (Soprano), Sophie Marin-Degor (Soprano), Nicolas Rivenq (Baritone),
Jean-Marc Salzmann (Bass)
Conductor:  William Christie
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Cappella Coloniensis
Period: Classical 
Written: 1753; Paris, France 
Language: French 
10. Sonata for Keyboard no 62 in E flat major, H 16 no 52 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Alain Planès (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1794; London, England 
11. Sonata for Keyboard no 60 in C major, H 16 no 50 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Alain Planès (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: c1794-95 
12. Sonata for Keyboard no 39 in D major, H 16 no 24 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Alain Planès (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: ?1773; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
13. Sonata for Keyboard no 33 in C minor, H 16 no 20 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Alain Planès (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1771; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
14. Requiem Mass by André Campra
Performer:  Elisabeth Baudry (Soprano), Monique Zanetti (Soprano), Josep Benet (Countertenor),
Stephen Varcoe (Baritone), John Elwes (Tenor)
Conductor:  Philippe Herreweghe
Orchestra/Ensemble:  La Chapelle Royale Paris
Period: Baroque 
Written: circa 1722; France 
15. Stabat Mater by Giovanni Battista Pergolesi
Performer:  Bernarda Fink (Mezzo Soprano), Anna Prohaska (Soprano)
Conductor:  Bernhard Forck
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy for Ancient Music Berlin
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1736; Pozzuoli, Italy 
16. Pièces de clavecin, Book 4: Ordre 26 in F sharp minor by François Couperin
Performer:  Christophe Rousset (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1730; Paris, France 
17. Pièces de clavecin, Book 4: Ordre 25 in E flat major/C major/C minor by François Couperin
Performer:  Christophe Rousset (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1730; Paris, France 
18. Pièces de clavecin, Book 2: Ordre 6 in B flat major by François Couperin
Performer:  Christophe Rousset (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1717; Paris, France 
19. Pièces de clavecin en concerts: 5th Concert by Jean-Philippe Rameau
Performer:  Christophe Rousset (Harpsichord), Ryo Terakado (Violin), Kaori Uemura (Bass Viola Da Gamba)
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1741; France 
20. Pièces de clavecin en concerts: 1st Concert by Jean-Philippe Rameau
Performer:  Christophe Rousset (Harpsichord), Ryo Terakado (Violin), Kaori Uemura (Bass Viola Da Gamba)
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1741; France 
21. Concertos (4) for Violin, Op. 8 no 1-4 "Four seasons" by Antonio Vivaldi
Performer:  Midori Seiler (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy for Ancient Music Berlin
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1725; Venice, Italy 
22. Concerto for Violin in E major, Op. 8 no 1/RV 269 "Primavera" by Antonio Vivaldi
Performer:  Midori Seiler (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy for Ancient Music Berlin
Period: Baroque 
Written: circa 1725; Venice, Italy 
23. Concerto for Violin in G minor, Op. 8 no 2/RV 315 "L'estate" by Antonio Vivaldi
Performer:  Midori Seiler (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy for Ancient Music Berlin
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1725; Venice, Italy 
24. Concerto for Violin in F major, Op. 8 no 3/RV 293 "L'autunno" by Antonio Vivaldi
Performer:  Midori Seiler (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy for Ancient Music Berlin
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1725; Venice, Italy 
25. Concerto for Violin in F minor, Op. 8 no 4/RV 297 "L'inverno" by Antonio Vivaldi
Performer:  Midori Seiler (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy for Ancient Music Berlin
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1725; Venice, Italy 
26. Concerto for Violin in A major, TV 51 no A 4 "Die Relinge" by Georg Philipp Telemann
Performer:  Midori Seiler (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy for Ancient Music Berlin
Period: Baroque 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 03/2001 
Venue:  Christ Church, Berlin, Germany 
Length: 12 Minutes 55 Secs. 
27. Brandenburg Concerto no 6 in B flat major, BWV 1051 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Conductor:  Richard Egarr
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy of Ancient Music
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1708-1710; ?Weimar, Germany 
28. Concertos (6) for Organ, Op. 4: no 3 in G minor, HWV 291 by George Frideric Handel
Performer:  Richard Egarr (Organ)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy of Ancient Music
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1735; London, England 
29. Concerto for Cello in G minor by Mathias Georg Monn
Performer:  Jean-Guihen Queyras (Cello)
Conductor:  Petra Müllejans
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Freiburg Baroque Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 18th Century; Austria 
30. Concerto grosso no 5 by Giuseppe Tartini
Conductor:  Chiara Banchini
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ensemble 415
Period: Baroque 
Written: 18th Century; Italy 
31. Concerto for Violin in A minor "Lunardo Venier" by Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Enrico Gatti (Violin)
Conductor:  Chiara Banchini
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ensemble 415
Period: Baroque 
Written: Italy 
32. Concertos (6) for Harpsichord, Wq 43: no 5 in G major/H 475 by Carl Philipp Emmanuel Bach
Performer:  Andreas Staier (Harpsichord)
Conductor:  Petra Müllejans
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Freiburg Baroque Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1771; Hamburg, Germany 
33. Concertos (6) for Keyboard, Op. 7: no 5 in E flat major by Johann Christian Bach
Performer:  Lars Ulrik Mortensen (Harpsichord)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  London Baroque
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1770; London, England 
34. Concerto for Violin no 1 in C major, H 7a no 1 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Gottfried Von der Goltz (Violin)
Conductor:  Gottfried Von der Goltz
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Freiburg Baroque Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1769; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
35. Concerto for Piano in G major, K 107 no 2 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Lars Ulrik Mortensen (Harpsichord)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  London Baroque
Period: Classical 
Written: 1772; Salzburg, Austria 
36. Sinfonia concertante for Winds in E flat major, K 297b (K Anh 9) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Javier Zafra (Bassoon), Susanne Kaiser (Flute), Ann-Kathrin Bruggemann (Oboe),
Erwin Wieringa (French Horn)
Conductor:  Gottfried Von der Goltz
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Freiburg Baroque Orchestra
Written: 1778 
37. Concerto for Clarinet/Flute/Cello in C major, B 106 by Ignace Joseph Pleyel
Performer:  Ivan Monighetti (Cello)
Conductor:  Stephan Mai
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy for Ancient Music Berlin
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1797 
38. Concerto for Piano no 21 in C major, K 467 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Stefan Vladar (Piano)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camerata Salzburg
Period: Classical 
Written: 1785; Vienna, Austria 
39. Concerto for Piano no 2 in B flat major, Op. 19 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Paul Lewis (Piano)
Conductor:  Jiri Belohlávek
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1793/1798; Vienna, Austria 
40. Symphony in D major, JC 14 by Giovanni Battista Sammartini
Conductor:  Chiara Banchini
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ensemble 415
Period: Classical 
Written: 18th Century; Italy 
41. Symphony in G major, JC 39 by Giovanni Battista Sammartini
Conductor:  Chiara Banchini
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ensemble 415
Period: Classical 
Written: 18th Century; Italy 
42. Sinfonia in F major, F 67 "Dissonant" by Wilhelm Friedemann Bach
Conductor:  Stephan Mai
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy for Ancient Music Berlin
Period: Classical 
Written: 1733-1746; Germany 
43. Sinfonias (4), Wq 183: no 1 in D major, H 663 by Carl Philipp Emmanuel Bach
Conductor:  Andrew Manze
Orchestra/Ensemble:  English Concert
Period: Classical 
Written: 1775-1776; Hamburg, Germany 
44. Symphony in D minor, Op. 12 no 4/G 506 "Nella casa del diavolo" by Luigi Boccherini
Conductor:  Chiara Banchini
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Ensemble 415
Period: Classical 
Written: 1771; Spain 
Date of Recording: 07/1988 
45. Symphonies (6), Op. 6: no 6 in G minor by Johann Christian Bach
Conductor:  Stephan Mai
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Academy for Ancient Music Berlin
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1770 
46. Symphony no 41 in C major, K 551 "Jupiter" by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor:  René Jacobs
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Freiburg Baroque Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1788; Vienna, Austria 
47. Sonata for Oboe and Basso Continuo in C minor, RV 53 by Antonio Vivaldi
Performer:  John Toll (Harpsichord), Paul Goodwin (Oboe), Nigel North (Archlute),
Susan Sheppard (Cello)
Period: Baroque 
Written: Venice, Italy 
48. Getreue Music-Meister: Sonata for Oboe and Basso Continuo in A minor, TV 41 no a 3 by Georg Philipp Telemann
Performer:  Susan Sheppard (Cello), Nigel North (Lute), Paul Goodwin (Oboe),
John Toll (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1728; Hamburg, Germany 
49. Musikalisches Opfer, BWV 1079: no 11, Trio Sonata for Flute and Continuo in C minor by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Davitt Moroney (Harpsichord), Janet See (Flute), John Holloway (Violin),
Jaap ter Linden (Cello), Martha Cook (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1747; Leipzig, Germany 
50. Trio for 2 Violins and Basso continuo in A major, HW 7 no 2 by J. C. F. Bach
Orchestra/Ensemble:  London Baroque
Period: Classical 
Written: Germany 
51. Trio Sonata for 2 Violins and Basso Continuo in F major, Wq 154/H 576 by Carl Philipp Emmanuel Bach
Orchestra/Ensemble:  London Baroque
Period: Classical 
52. Sonatas (4) for Harpsichord, Violin and Cello, Op. 16: no 4 in F major by Johann Schobert
Performer:  Chiara Banchini (Violin), Luciano Sgrizzi (Piano), Philipp Bosbach (Cello)
Period: Classical 
53. Sonatas (7) for Keyboard "Frische Clavier Früchte": no 3 by Johann Kuhnau
Performer:  John Butt (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1696; Germany 
54. Sonatas (7) for Keyboard "Frische Clavier Früchte: no 5 by Johann Kuhnau
Performer:  John Butt (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1696; Germany 
55. Sonatas (7) for Keyboard "Frische Clavier Früchte: no 7 by Johann Kuhnau
Performer:  John Butt (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1696; Germany 
56. Pieces de clavecin avec voix et violon, Op 5: Paratum cor meum by Jean-Joseph Cassanéa de Mondonville
Performer:  Judith Nelson (Soprano), Stanley Ritchie (Violin), William Christie (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1748 
57. Pieces de clavecin avec voix et violon, Op 5: In Domino laudabitur by Jean-Joseph Cassanéa de Mondonville
Performer:  Judith Nelson (Soprano), Stanley Ritchie (Violin), William Christie (Harpsichord)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1748 
58. Sonata for Violin and Piano in F major, K 376 (374d) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Chiara Banchini (Violin), Temenuschka Vesselinova (Fortepiano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1781; Vienna, Austria 
59. Sonata for Violin and Piano in G major, K 379 (373a) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Chiara Banchini (Violin), Temenuschka Vesselinova (Fortepiano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1781; Vienna, Austria 
60. Trio for Piano, Violin and Cello in C major, H 15 no 27 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Erich Höbarth (Violin), Christophe Coin (Cello), Patrick Cohen (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1795-1797; Vienna, Austria 
61. Trio for Piano and Strings no 1 in G major, K 496 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Mozartean Players
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Vienna, Austria 
62. Trio for Piano and Strings no 3 in C minor, Op. 1 no 3 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Andreas Staier (Fortepiano), Daniel Sepec (Violin), Jean-Guihen Queyras (Cello)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1794-1795; Vienna, Austria 
63. Sonata for Piano no 12 in F major, K 332 (300k) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Andreas Staier (Harpsichord)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1781-1783; Vienna, Austria 
64. Sonata for Piano no 10 in C major, K 330 (300h) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Andreas Staier (Harpsichord)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1781-1783 
65. Sonata for Piano no 4 in E flat major, K 282 (189g) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Andreas Staier (Harpsichord)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1775; Munich, Germany 
66. Sonata for Piano no 21 in C major, Op. 53 "Waldstein" by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Paul Lewis (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1803-1804; Vienna, Austria 
67. Sonata for Piano no 17 in D minor, Op. 31 no 2 "Tempest" by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Paul Lewis (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1802; Vienna, Austria 
68. Sonata for Piano no 1 in F minor, Op. 2 no 1 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Paul Lewis (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1793-1795; Vienna, Austria 
69. Quartets (6) for Flute, Violin, Viola da Gamba, Bk 1 "Paris Quartets": no 3 in A, TV 43 no A 1 by Georg Philipp Telemann
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Freiburg Baroque Orchestra Consort
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1730; Hamburg, Germany 
70. Quartet for Strings in C major, Op. 33 no 3/H 3 no 39 "Bird" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Jerusalem String Quartet
Period: Classical 
Written: 1781; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Length: 19 Minutes 25 Secs. 
71. Quartet for Strings no 4 in C major, K 157 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Jerusalem String Quartet
Period: Classical 
Written: 1772-1773; Milan, Italy 
72. Quartet for Strings no 17 in B flat major, K 458 "Hunt" by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Jerusalem String Quartet
Period: Classical 
Written: 1784; Vienna, Austria 
73. Quartets (6) for Clarinet/Oboe and Strings Op. 8: no 1 in D major by Carl Stamitz
Performer:  Paul Goodwin (Oboe)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Terzetto
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1773; France 
74. Quartet for Strings in D minor, Op. 76 no 2/H 3 no 76 "Quinten" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Jerusalem String Quartet
Period: Classical 
Written: 1797; Vienna, Austria 
75. Quartet for Strings no 6 in B flat major, Op. 18 no 6 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Tokyo String Quartet
Written: 1798/1800 
76. Quartet for Strings no 13 in B flat major, Op. 130 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Tokyo String Quartet
Period: Classical 
Written: 1825-1826; Vienna, Austria 
77. Grosse Fuge for String Quartet in B flat major Op. 133 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Tokyo String Quartet
Period: Classical 
Written: 1825-1826; Vienna, Austria 
78. Quartet for Strings no 16 in F major, Op. 135 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Tokyo String Quartet
Written: 1826 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  5 Customer Reviews )
 Beautiful music and great value March 31, 2014 By Robert K. See All My Reviews "I am extremely happy with the quality of performances and recording across almost all of the CDs contained in this package. Frankly, I am puzzled about the very low review from another purchaser. I wonder if they were expecting something other than music of the 18th century, because these are some of the best recordings out there. Very highly recommended if you like this era in music." Report Abuse
 Superb collection value  January 12, 2013 By Thomas L. (Nashville, TN) See All My Reviews "Comprehensive, lovely, and affordable. Everything you could want in a boxed set." Report Abuse
 lot of music for a little money August 28, 2012 By William M. (Sarasota, FL) See All My Reviews "This collection provides a terrific amount of music for not much money. Unfotunately to a great extent you get what you pay for. The CD quality ranges from not very good to horrible. I'm going to put the collection up for bid on e-bay and will be happy if I get half of what I paid for it." Report Abuse
Review This Title
Review This Title Share on Facebook