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Anthology Of The Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra Vol 6 - Live Radio Recordings 1990-2000

Royal Concertgebouw Orch
Release Date: 10/11/2011 
Label:  Rco Live   Catalog #: 11004  
Composer:  Béla BartókLudwig van BeethovenLuciano BerioHector Berlioz,   ... 
Performer:  Ildiko KomlósiKolos KovacsMartha ArgerichAnn Murray,   ... 
Conductor:  Iván FischerClaus Peter FlorWolfgang SawallischLuciano Berio,   ... 
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw OrchestraSwingle SingersNetherlands Radio Women's Chorus
Number of Discs: 14 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews



ANTHOLOGY OF THE ROYAL CONCERTGEBOUW ORCHESTRA 1990–2000 Various conductors and soloists RCO LIVE 11004 (14 CDs: 17:09:09)


CD 1: BARTÓK Bluebeard’s Castle (Ivan Fischer, cond; Ildikó Komlósi, mez; Kolos Kovács, bs). CD 2: MAHLER Symphony No. 5 (Klaus Tennstedt). Read more class="ARIAL12b">CD 3: BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 6 (Wolfgang Sawallisch). SIBELIUS Symphony No. 4 (Paavo Berglund). CD 4: MARTIN Concerto for 7 Wind Instruments (Riccardo Chailly). DUTILLEUX L’Arbre des songes (Isabelle van Keulen, vn; Charles Dutoit, cond). SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 1 (Georg Solti). CD 5: ELGAR Symphony No. 2 (André Previn). LUTOS?AWSKI Concerto for Orchestra ( Stanislav Skrowaczewski ). CD 6: WAGNER Rienzi: Overture (Mariss Jansons). RAVEL Ma Mère l’oye (Bernard Haitink). ZEMLINSKY Symphonic Songs (Willard White, bar; Chailly, cond). CD 7: BARTÓK Piano Concerto No. 3 (Martha Argerich, pn; Claus Peter Flor, cond). DALLAPICCOLA Liriche Greche (Lucy Shelton, sop; Reinbert de Leeuw, cond). MESSIAEN 3 Petites Liturgies de la Présence Divine (Dutoit, cond; Marc-André Hamelin, pn; Jean Laurendeau, ondes martinot; Women of the Netherlands R Ch). CD 8: DEBUSSY Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune (Jean Fournet). HINDEMITH Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes by Carl Maria von Weber (Chailly). ZIMMERMANN Trumpet Concerto (Peter Masseurs, tpt; Edo de Waart, cond). SCHOENBERG Verklärte Nacht (Pierre Boulez). CD 9: BRAHMS Tragic Overture (Nikolaus Harnoncourt). SCHUMANN Fantasy in C (Thomas Zehetmaire, vn; Harnoncourt, cond). SCHUBERT Symphony No. 9 (John Eliot Gardiner). CD 10: SCHOENBERG 5 Orchestral Pieces , op. 16 (Jansons). LOEVENDIE Piano Concerto (Ronald Brautigam, pn; Chailly, cond). MOZART Symphony No. 40 (Harnoncourt). CD 11: BRUCKNER Symphony No. 3 (Kurt Sanderling). DIEPENBROCK Hymne an die Nacht No. 2 (Nathalie Stutzmann, alt; Chailly, cond). CD 12: STRAVINSKY Le Baiser de la fée: Divertimento (Gennady Rozhdestvensky ). FELDMAN Coptic Light (Peter Eötvös). BERIO Sinfonia (Luciano Berio, cond; Swingle Singers). CD 13: PIJPER 6 Symphonic Epigrams (Haitink). BERLIOZ Les Nuits d’été (Ann Murray, sop; Haitink, cond). R. STRAUSS Tod und Verklärung (Kurt Masur). IVES 3 Places in New England (John Adams). CD 14: TAKEMITSU A Flock Descends into the Pentagonal Garden (Adams). SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 5 (Sanderling). SCHREKER Vom ewigen Leben (Claudia Barainsky, sop; Gerd Albrecht, cond)


This is the sixth 14-CD set of Concertgebouw live performances, each covering a decade, except that the first one went back to 1935. There also have been four large sets devoted to Mengelberg, van Beinum, Haitink, and Chailly. These 128 discs form a prodigious, perhaps unique documentation of one of the world’s great orchestras. I once made a rough calculation that some 15 percent of all Concertgebouw performances in recent decades (excluding repeat concerts of a given program) have appeared on CDs. Add to these statistics the golden acoustics of the hall and the fact that Dutch engineers have always been at the forefront of recorded sound. Even the 1930s broadcasts are listenable, and the last three sets (including this one) are filled with audiophile treasures. If that weren’t enough, the CDs in this set average 73.5 minutes in length.


Trumpets were often a problem with the Concertgebouw in earlier eras; they could be sharp in pitch and dry in tonal quality. The first two discs here show them to be glorious in 1990: brilliant, shining, solidly pitched. Iván Fischer’s Bluebeard’s Castle (1/6/1990) is less dramatic than his recent Channel Classics CD ( Fanfare 35:3). The singers are fine, but the expansive Concertgebouw acoustics shine too much sun on the cold, blood-drenched stones of the castle, denying this tense, crabbed opera a necessary intimacy. The sound favors the orchestra—which is resplendent—over the vocalists. Klaus Tennstedt’s Mahler Fifth (12/9/1990) is slow and gentle, running 76:26. Aided by the purity of the Concertgebouw brass, it is undeniably beautiful, but—most unusual for this conductor—it loses focus at some moments. Although only 64 at the time, Tennstedt had been suffering from cancer for some years and was nearing the end of his career. Wolfgang Sawallisch’s Beethoven “Pastoral” (3/10/1991) is nearly identical to his EMI recording, made in Amsterdam that same week; it is thoroughly conventional and beautifully played. What more could one ask for? A lighter touch and a higher polish—both Concertgebouw specialties. The fall from Beethoven’s happy scenes to the doom and gloom of Sibelius’s Fourth is a shock. Paavo Berglund (9/11/1991) has the brass snapping and snarling around shining strings and luscious woodwinds. It’s an odd combination for this most difficult of Sibelius symphonies, making it almost beautiful but sacrificing some of its dark power.


Where else could Frank Martin find seven wind instruments as gorgeous as these? His thoughtful, intriguing concerto becomes a brilliant showpiece under Riccardo Chailly (9/26/1991), thoroughly eclipsing both Jean Martinon (RCA) and Ernest Ansermet (London). This is a Want List entry all by itself. Isabelle van Keulen’s performance under Charles Dutoit (2/2/1991) of Henri Dutilleux’s L’Arbre des songes is a series of fascinating moments, beautifully played, but the violin concerto doesn’t hang together as well as in the original Isaac Stern recording. The otherwise superb recorded sound pays too much attention to the soloist, shortchanging Dutilleux’s typically luminous scoring. Georg Solti leads a subtle, unexpectedly reserved performance of the Shostakovich First (9/19/1991). It is not a success: In looking for something the music doesn’t have, he misses most of what it does.


André Previn’s Elgar Second (2/19/1992) is golden and luxurious. Although I don’t understand the appeal of this symphony, I think that English orchestras and conductors have dug deeper and found more guts in it. Stanislav Skrowaczewski fills his compatriot Witold Lutos?awski’s Concerto for Orchestra (2/18/1993) with unusual grace and color, a far cry from the many hard, cold performances on record. One can hardly believe it is the same piece. Mariss Jansons’s Rienzi Overture (12/9/1993) is beautiful but deadly slow; the audience loves it. Bernard Haitink is at one with his old orchestra (2/24/1993) in Ma Mère l’oye . His live performances are always more interesting than his studio recordings. Alexander Zemlinsky’s op. 20 songs are late works (1925) far removed from his early, postromantic music. Angry, mournful poems by members of the Harlem Renaissance (Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Countée Cullen, and Frank Horne) are set to harsh, nearly atonal music. Willard White captures their every ounce of feeling, and Chailly’s orchestra abandons its usual beauties to realize the music’s full anguish (10/10/1993).


Martha Argerich’s Bartók Third Concerto, with Claus Peter Flor (12/16/1993), is warm and lyrical; it’s like hearing the unmatched initial recording (György Sandor, Eugene Ormandy, and the Philadelphia Orchestra) in brilliant stereo. Luigi Dallapiccola’s Liriche Greche is a haunting, amazingly lyrical 12-tone song cycle, superbly sung (in a French translation) by Lucy Shelton and played under Reinbert de Leeeuw (4/29/1993). The lack of texts in this set is especially damaging for this little-known music. This is the only recording listed on ArkivMusic; three others appear on Amazon, but they are all prohibitively expensive. The Eulenberg score may be purchased for $16 on several sites. This Dutoit-led performance of Oliver Messiaen’s Trois petites Liturgies (1/21/1994) is another Want List-caliber item, magical and beautiful beyond description.


Debussy’s Faune is manna for this orchestra; where else could it sound so ethereal, yet so sensual (Jean Fournet, 2/24/1995)? Hindemith’s Symphonic Metamorphoses is a startling change of pace; Chailly puts “the world’s greatest orchestra” (in a recent British survey) through its paces (4/29/1994), making this excruciatingly difficult music sound easy. The flute solo that opens the Turandot Scherzo is sublime, but a cautious finale misses the rhythmic excitement of Leonard Bernstein’s New York Philharmonic. Bernd Alois Zimmermann’s Trumpet Concerto, subtitled “Nobody Knows De Trouble I See,” is a spectacular tour-de-force by the orchestra’s first trumpet, Peter Masseurs, followed carefully by Edo de Waart (6/29/1995). It is exhausting, even for the listener, well before its 13 minutes are up. Conductors—even Pierre Boulez—seem unable to resist the beauty that this orchestra can produce in this hall. The 1917 full-strings arrangement of Verklärte Nacht is ravishing in this (10/27/1995) performance, at the cost of all its drama.


Many details in Nikolaus Harnoncourt’s Tragic Overture (5/12/1995) suggest that the orchestra is using parts marked at Willem Mengelberg’s instructions 53 years earlier, but even slower tempos and too-obvious bar lines keep it from achieving the dramatic sweep of the 1942 recording. Violinist Thomas Zehetmair and Harnoncourt struggle to make Schumann’s awkward 1853 Fantasy coalesce (5/12/1995). John Eliot Gardiner’s “Great C-Major” Symphony (11/1/1996) is elegant and fastidious but lacks the panache of Concertgebouw performances from Mengelberg to Bernstein. Jansons shines a brilliant light on Schoenberg’s freely atonal pieces (11/24/1995); not being among his best works, they still fail to impress. Chailly and Ronald Brautigam, the Dutch pianist who can play anything, gives the world premiere (4/19/1996) of Theo Loevendie’s Piano Concerto. Alternating between violence and tranquility, it is almost rescued by a sparkling finale. Harnoncourt leads a vigorous, big-orchestra Mozart G Minor (1/29/1997), with explosive fortes and a refreshing lack of sentiment. It thrills ears long jaded by limp performances of this perennial warhorse. Although his tempos are within consensus (the Allegro assai finale is not rushed, as it so often is), repeats extend the symphony to well over 34 wonderful minutes.


Kurt Sanderling’s Bruckner Third (11/8/1996) is so refined as to lose all momentum. Alphons Diepenbrock’s lush, dark, 19-minute Hymne an die Nacht No. 2, written in 1899, sums up the entire late-Romantic era; a rich blend of Wagner, Mahler, early Schoenberg, and Rachmaninoff, even Debussy, it preceded much of their music. Novalis’s texts can be found with a Chandos disc, CHAN 8878, available for a pittance on Amazon—but be sure to get the right disc: Alphons Diepenbrock Volume II—Symphonic Songs with a black-and-white cover. Chandos’s Linda Finnie is warmer and smoother than alto Nathalie Stutzmann, the Residente Orchestra is nearly a match for Chailly’s Concertgebouw (10/10/1997), and the darker Chandos recorded sound fits the music perfectly. Both are superlative revelations of a long-forgotten treasure by a little-known master.


Gennady Rozhestvensky’s Baiser de la fée Divertimento (4/27/1997) is brilliant and—of course—spectacularly well played, but Ansermet’s airy touch (in both his recordings) is missed. (Picky, picky! It’s ridiculous to ask for more than the Concertgebouw delivers.) Morton Feldman’s Coptic Light is far livelier than most of his static music; its Feldmanity is in not going anywhere for 22 minutes. Peter Eötvös has the orchestra luxuriating in the Messiaen-like variety of colors (10/13/1998), and the Amsterdam audience is surprisingly receptive. Luciano Berio conducted his popular, fascinating Sinfonia throughout the world, often with these Swingle Singers, including its 1968 premiere and first recording (a fifth movement has been added since), both with the New York Philharmonic, plus at least two more of its many recordings. This performance (5/16/1997) is—one has to say it again—brilliant, the Mahler Scherzo hidden a bit deeper behind the miscellaneous conversations than before. For the first time in this set, the audience bursts into cheers. Berio was a superb conductor, and not only of his own music; his 1986 Haydn Symphony No. 90 with the New Yorkers remains my favorite performance of a favorite work.


Six Symphonic Epigrams (1928) is Willem Pijper’s most-often-played work, perhaps because of its six-minute brevity. Haitink’s 3/19/1999 performance is bright and forward; I remember older recordings, Eduard van Beinum’s in particular, as being more reserved and leaving a stronger impression. Supported by Haitink, the underrated (despite logging 166 recordings on ArkivMusic) Irish mezzo Ann Murray creates a heartrending Les Nuits d’été (3/19/1999). In my experience, only Régine Crespin has matched this stunning performance. Haitink’s Death and Transfiguration (6/11/1999) is straightforward and correct, but a show of beautiful brass is not what the piece is about. It needs the mystical magic of old-timers such as Furtwängler, Stokowski, and Mengelberg, not only for their individual excellences but for the exalted position the work held in their era, which I doubt can be revived. Charles Ives’s Three Places in New England might seem a huge philosophical leap from Strauss, but its musical restlessness is but a few steps away. Similarly, John Adams’s 4/18/1998 performance is a bit too clean, too solid, drying up its locale’s damp mists. For once, the Concertgebouw seems to be out of its element, on unsure footing.


Toru Takemitsu’s A Flock Descends into the Pentagonal Gardens is another post-Messiaen work, brimming with shining colors, with slightly more advanced harmonies. Adams conducts again, on the same day as the Ives, and this time everything goes wonderfully. The orchestra, the hall, and the Dutch engineers are perfect for this sort of music (see Messiaen and Feldman, above). Sanderling returns for Shostakovich’s Fifth (6/11/1999). The initial Moderato is slow, delicate, and quiet; it is eerily effective, at once mysterious and beautiful. The finale opens with an almost Bernsteinian ferocity before scaling back to the Moderato’s creepy mystery; it then builds with slow but feverish intensity to the great closing bass drum whacks, sounding here like Mahler’s hammer strokes. Again the audience erupts. After which, Franz Schreker’s final two songs (from Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass ), clothed in his rich harmonies and lush scoring, make a fitting epilog (3/10/2000) to this 10-year concert.


The 100-page booklet (in English, Spanish, and Dutch) continues this series’ beating-of-the-breast stance, digging into every facet of the orchestra’s 1990s decade. Successes, problems, and internal squabbles are given equal coverage; one section of the text is headlined “Hairline Cracks” (in Chailly’s relationship with the orchestra). You won’t find American orchestras, so corporate have they become, admitting to anything like this. There are 37 performances here, at least a dozen of which are stupendous, with only a few turkeys. What more could one ask?


FANFARE: James H. North
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Works on This Recording

1.
Bluebeard's Castle, Op. 11/Sz 48 by Béla Bartók
Performer:  Ildiko Komlósi (Mezzo Soprano), Kolos Kovacs (Baritone)
Conductor:  Iván Fischer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1911/1918; Budapest, Hungary 
2.
Concerto for Piano no 3, Sz 119 by Béla Bartók
Performer:  Martha Argerich (Piano)
Conductor:  Claus Peter Flor
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1945; USA 
3.
Symphony no 6 in F major, Op. 68 "Pastoral" by Ludwig van Beethoven
Conductor:  Wolfgang Sawallisch
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1808; Vienna, Austria 
4.
Sinfonia for Eight Voices and Orchestra by Luciano Berio
Conductor:  Luciano Berio
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra,  Swingle Singers
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1968-1969 
5.
Les nuits d'été, Op. 7 by Hector Berlioz
Performer:  Ann Murray (Mezzo Soprano)
Conductor:  Bernard Haitink
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1840-1841; France 
6.
Tragic Overture, Op. 81 by Johannes Brahms
Conductor:  Nikolaus Harnoncourt
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1880; Austria 
7.
Symphony no 3 in D minor, WAB 103 by Anton Bruckner
Conductor:  Kurt Sanderling
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: Vienna, Austria 
8.
Liriche Greche (13) by Luigi Dallapiccola
Performer:  Lucy Shelton (Soprano)
Conductor:  Reinbert De Leeuw
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1942; Italy 
9.
Prélude ŕ l'aprčs-midi d'un faune by Claude Debussy
Conductor:  Jean Fournet
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1892-1894; France 
10.
Hymne an die Nacht no 2 by Alphons Diepenbrock
Performer:  Nathalie Stutzmann (Alto)
Conductor:  Riccardo Chailly
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1899/1909; Netherlands (Holland 
11.
Concerto for Violin "L'arbre des songes" by Henri Dutilleux
Performer:  Isabelle van Keulen (Violin)
Conductor:  Charles Dutoit
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1985; France 
12.
Symphony no 2 in E flat major, Op. 63 by Sir Edward Elgar
Conductor:  André Previn
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1909-1911; England 
13.
Coptic Light by Morton Feldman
Conductor:  Peter Eötvös
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1986; USA 
14.
Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber by Paul Hindemith
Conductor:  Riccardo Chailly
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1943; USA 
15.
First Orchestral Set "Three Places in New England" by Charles Ives
Conductor:  John Adams
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: circa 1912-1921; USA 
16.
Concerto for Piano by Theo Loevendie
Performer:  Ronald Brautigam (Piano)
Conductor:  André Previn
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
17.
Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski
Conductor:  Stanislaw Skrowaczewski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1954; Poland 
18.
Symphony no 5 in C sharp minor by Gustav Mahler
Conductor:  Klaus Tennstedt
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1901-1902; Vienna, Austria 
19.
Concerto for 7 Winds, Percussion and Strings by Frank Martin
Conductor:  Riccardo Chailly
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1949; Switzerland 
20.
Petites liturgies (3) de la Présence Divine by Olivier Messiaen
Performer:  Jean Laurendeau (Ondes Martenot), Marc-André Hamelin (Piano)
Conductor:  Charles Dutoit
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra,  Netherlands Radio Women's Chorus
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1944; France 
21.
Symphony no 40 in G minor, K 550 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor:  Nikolaus Harnoncourt
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1788; Vienna, Austria 
22.
Zes symfonische epigrammen by Willem Pijper
Conductor:  Bernard Haitink
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1928 
23.
Ma mčre l'oye by Maurice Ravel
Conductor:  Bernard Haitink
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: France 
24.
Verklärte Nacht for String Orchestra, Op. 4 by Arnold Schoenberg
Conductor:  Pierre Boulez
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1899/1943; Vienna, Austria 
25.
Pieces (5) for Orchestra, Op. 16 by Arnold Schoenberg
Conductor:  Mariss Jansons
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1909; Vienna, Austria 
26.
Vom ewigen Leben by Franz Schreker
Performer:  Claudia Barainsky (Soprano)
Conductor:  Gerd Albrecht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1927; Austria 
27.
Symphony no 9 in C major, D 944 "Great" by Franz Schubert
Conductor:  John Eliot Gardiner
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: ?1825-28; Vienna, Austria 
28.
Fantasie for Violin and Orchestra in C major, Op. 131 by Robert Schumann
Performer:  Thomas Zehetmair (Violin)
Conductor:  Nikolaus Harnoncourt
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1853; Germany 
29.
Symphony no 1 in F minor, Op. 10 by Dmitri Shostakovich
Conductor:  Sir Georg Solti
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1924-1925; USSR 
30.
Symphony no 4 in A minor, Op. 63 by Jean Sibelius
Conductor:  Paavo Berglund
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1911; Finland 
31.
Symphony no 5 in D minor, Op. 47 by Dmitri Shostakovich
Conductor:  Kurt Sanderling
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1937; USSR 
32.
Tod und Verklärung, Op. 24 by Richard Strauss
Conductor:  Kurt Masur
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1888-1889; Germany 
33.
Le baiser de la fée: Divertimento for Orchestra by Igor Stravinsky
Conductor:  Gennadi Rozhdestvensky
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1934; France 
34.
A Flock Descends into the Pentagonal Garden by Toru Takemitsu
Conductor:  John Adams
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1977; Japan 
35.
Rienzi: Overture by Richard Wagner
Conductor:  Mariss Jansons
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1840-1843; Germany 
36.
Sinfonische Gesänge, Op. 20 by Alexander von Zemlinsky
Performer:  Willard White (Bass)
Conductor:  Riccardo Chailly
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1929; Vienna, Austria 
37.
Concerto for Trumpet in C major "Nobody knows de trouble I see" by Bernd Alois Zimmermann
Performer:  Peter Masseurs (Trumpet)
Conductor:  Edo De Waart
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1954; Germany 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 What Happened to other part of original order? January 15, 2014 By Stanley Szwalek (Traverse City, MI) See All My Reviews "I originally ordered both Volume 6 & 7 of the Anthology of Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra. At the time of initial order, volume 6 was available and volume 7 was back ordered. This was on December 15, 2013. Volume 6 was sent and I received it. Volume 7 was listed as "in stock" as of December 20th. Unfortunately, I still have not received volume 7 nor have I been notified that it has been sent. Hopefully, volume 7 can be sent soon. Still listed as in stock." Report Abuse
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