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Chopin: Piano Works / Alfred Cortot


Release Date: 01/23/1992 
Label:  Emi Laser Series Catalog #: 67359   Spars Code: ADD 
Composer:  Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot
Conductor:  Sir John Barbirolli
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Orchestra
Number of Discs: 6 
Recorded in: Mono 
Length: 7 Hours 9 Mins. 

This title is currently unavailable.



This CD is reissued by ArkivMusic.

Notes and Editorial Reviews

You will not easily find a more absorbing box set of piano discs, or one that will be so frequently played while others languish in dusty oblivion, often examples of the dull respectability Cortot so demonstrably shunned.

___________________________________

Alfred Cortot's Chopin abounds with ecstasy, risk, idiosyncratic rubato, soaring melodic projection, and boundless nuance. A brilliant but erratic technician, Cortot was infamous for wrong notes but less celebrated for how he always nailed the perfect tempo for a particular piece. Like most pianists of his generation, Cortot pulls inner voices out of the woodwork, adds bass octaves at will, and doesn't always synchronize his hands, yet he employs these
Read more devices toward specific coloristic and expressive ends.

EMI's newly re-released 1991 six-disc Cortot/Chopin anthology stands out for the inclusion of otherwise hard-to-find rarities, such as the pianist's 1943 French HMV Etudes, Preludes, and Waltzes. Generally these sets are inferior to their better-known 1933/34 counterparts, notwithstanding individual flights of fancy not replicated elsewhere (the Op. 10 No. 2 Etude's highlighted tenor voice, the Op. 18 Waltz's dynamic surges).

Cortot's 1933/34 Etudes are reproduced intact, yet only four selections represent the 1934 Waltzes, together with a handful of Preludes from Cortot's 1926 cycle and a previously unissued 1928 take of the 12th Prelude. As for other cycles, those in charge rightly opted for Cortot's 1933 Ballades, 1931 B minor sonata, 1933 B-flat minor sonata, and 1929 E-flat Nocturne Op. 9 No. 2 over other Cortot versions, plus the classic, impassioned 1933 recordings of the Tarantella, the Barcarolle, and the F minor Fantasy. But I don't share annotator Guthrie Luke's justifications for omitting the 1933 Fantasie-Impromptu. True, it's not Cortot at his best, but it's far from his worst.

The thrice-familiar A-flat Polonaise conveys sweeping élan, albeit without the poise and polish of other 78-era interpretations (Rubinstein, Lhevinne, and Horowitz, for example), but the F minor concerto's classic stature needs no qualification. And Disc 1 offers a choice selection from Cortot's acoustic and early electrical Chopin 78s.

Charles Levin's transfers more than hold their own alongside competing restorations by Ward Marston and Seth Winner, although the 1949-51 Nocturnes, C-sharp minor Prelude Op. 45, and Nouvelles Etudes boast less surface noise and more mid-range emphasis via APR's late Cortot reissue series. Thanks to Arkivmusic.com's on-demand reprint program for making this fascinating collection available again.

--Jed Distler, ClassicsToday.com

________________________________

Has there ever been a more bewitching or endearing virtuoso than Alfred Cortot? His touch (an old-fashioned word but one inseparable from the man) was of a crystalline clarity, his coloration alive with myriad tints and hues. Combined with a poetic passion that knew no limits, such qualities created an idiosyncrasy and style that usually survived a fallible and bewilderingly confused keyboard mechanism. The truth is that Cortot had neither the time nor the inclination to polish his performances to a high degree of perfection. His hyperactive life (conductor, teacher, editor, writer and, more darkly, politician) made systematic practice a luxury. This, together with a gremlin who mischievously deflected his fingers away from the right notes—often at crucial if surprisingly undemanding points in the musical argument— added piquant harmonies and dissonances undreamed of by his composers. Cortot's left hand in particular had a way of drifting in and out of focus (two rather than three beats in his gossamer rhythmic support in many of the Chopin waltzes) and leading a wayward and disobedient life of its own. Such famous errors surely resulted not from incompetence, but from Cortot's nervous, high-pitched intensity; a sheer involvement that could easily cloud his composure or unsettle his equilibrium.

Yet for the greater part Chopin's elusive essence emerged unscathed from so much inaccuracy and caprice. Like the beam of a lighthouse piercing the surrounding gloom Cortot's vividness outshone his faults and made critical complaint or the use of a Beckmesser's slate seem churlish and arbitrary. His falls from grace could indeed seem like spots on the sun, and in the words of Yvonne Lefebure (always among his most distinguished pupils) "his wrong notes were those of a God".

Having grown up with Cortot's early 78rpm sets of Chopin, I have deeply resented their absence from the catalogue for so many years. How one missed his nimbleness, his arch-Gallic vivacity and, above all, his entirely 'vocal' conception of a score. The limitations of other more 'correct', less volatile Chopin struck one at every turn. Happily, today's situation is very different. Once there was virtually nothing (what there was usually only available in Japan), now there is a positive deluge of reissues and, indeed, of duplications from Pearl, Biddulph, Music and Arts and, far from least, from EMI. Here on six glorious CDs is Cortot's Chopin at last in all its infinite richness and variety. The transfers are outstanding, with no attempt made to mask the glitter of his brilliance in the interests of silent surfaces or to remove other acoustical hiccups. Although not everything is included, Guthrie Luke's selection is wonderfully enterprising and judicious, with several alternative performances of the same work offered for perusal. My only quibble is the preference shown for the 1942 set of the Preludes when the earlier 1933 recording seems to me infinitely superior (available on EMI CD CDH7 61050-2, 1/89). I also regret the omission of the Fantaisieimpromptu, which Luke claims in his excellent notes was too disappointing for inclusion.

In the first volume which concentrates on recordings dating from 1920 to 1931 even the dim and distant sound cannot mar the sheer charisma of much of the playing. In both versions of the Berceuse Cortot's heart-stopping rubato tugs against the music's natural pulse, and although the later is less stylistically lavish, both accounts show his capacity, particularly in his early and relatively carefree days, to spin off the most delicate fioriture with a nonchalant iridescent fantasy and facility. His relish, too, of that surprise chiming C natural just before the conclusion is pure Cortot, a true "shock" rather than a "digital impression", to quote his own differentiation where true artistry is concerned. Both performances are teasing sophistications of innocence, of childhood dreams seen through adult eyes. Elsewhere you will hear a Black Keys Etude (Op. 10 No. 5) wickedly tinted and inflected despite the most vertiginous brilliance and rapidity of reflex, and an Aeolian Harp (Op. 25 No. 1) where the melody glides across a harmonic haze as if on air cushions. All praise, too, for the inclusion of Cortot's fire-eating performance of the Twelfth Prelude, a less muted experience than his 1942 account.

The 1931 B minor Sonata is also far superior to a later version from 1933 (although the space between Cortot's various recordings was often narrow, his performances, while retaining their essential outward characteristics, varied in detail, biased this way or that according to the heat and inspiration of the moment) with a ravishing second subject in the opening Allegro maestoso and a central quaver flow in the Largo in which melody and counter-melody swell and recede like some magical sea. Cortot's 1933 B flat minor Sonata is also a far cry from one made in 1953, where his powers failed him almost totally and is, indeed, of a dizzying aplomb and brio. The opening movement proceeds at a headlong tempo, and who but Cortot could drive the triplet ascents and descents after the brief second subject's expansion with such a total disregard for anything other than their rhythmic force and inflammatory life? In his hands the Scherzo, which like all Chopin's Scherzos is in rapid triple time, becomes a compelling answer to Liszt's Mephisto Waltz (written so many years later). And here only Rachmaninov in 98 his recording (Music Memoria, 11/91) equals Cortot in sheer rhythmic elan. The Funeral March's central trio becomes a true benediction, with a good deal less de-synchronization than one might have expected, and in his light-fingered whirl through the phantom finale Cortot allows himsel f just one furious gust before the final explosion.

The A flat was the only Polonaise Cortot recorded (though Music and Arts have a Polonaise-Famaisie previously unissued and dating from 1947 and there is a 1923 recording of Op. 22, mutilated rather than cut and minus its preceding Andante spianato—{D MACD615) which is regrettable considering the fire he brings to Poland's most ebullient and regal dance. There are growling bass reinforcements and the principal melody shouts its triumph at one point an octave higher than written, though it has to be said that Cortot had a way of making such licence irresistible. His is a wilder, less contained or civilized view of Chopin's nationalism than Artur Rubinstein's in his rightly celebrated and most aristocratic 1966 RCA account (12/86). Cortot could be a master of Gallic understatement but when the mood took him he hardly did things by halves.

There is elaboration too in the Second Ballade, the volcanic interjections ablaze with added notes, and in the opening of the last and glorious Fourth Ballade there is a convulsive leap across the rhythm, one of Cortot's most curious and instantly recognizable mannerisms and a provocative view of one of the composer's supremely rich and tranquil gestures. However the gem is surely the Third Ballade with the opening pages played as if improvised on the spot, the figuration commencing at 3'34" foaming and cascading with a freedom and liberality unknown to most players. The F minor Fantaisie also suggests that Cortot never compromised where his intensity of vision was concerned, aiming for speeds which other more stable pianists would never dare consider, and achieving in the process a truly demonic force rather than the heroics of received custom or taste.

Cortot's Barcarolle (his only recording of one of Chopin's greatest masterpieces) was once described by a French critic as "un rituel eroticpassionel" and it is indeed as insinuating as it is blisteringly intense, even though the hectic rush through the final pages shows him at his least eloquent. In the Etudes (the 1934 is preferable to the 1942 set; both are included) he reaches out far beyond mere pedagogical concerns. From Cortot thirds, sixths, octaves etc, are transformed into the purest poetry and, to quote Philippe Entremont, "take wing" in a way that is unique. Listen to his way with Chopin's instruction la melodia tenuta e legata in the E minor, Op. 25 No. 5, or the urgency (rather than mere proficiency) with which the notorious thirds of Op. 25 No. 6 are propelled, and you may well feel that you are hearing this music for the first time. The final and awe inspiring Op. 25 No. 12, too, is not the cantus firmus of a traditional view but an elemental declamation and upheaval.

In the Waltzes there is a near operatic freedom in the melody of Op. 42 with its cunning mix of duple and triple rhythm, a charming decorative aside at bar 20 in the E flat, Op. 18 (only in the 1943 version) and a puckish mercurial touch throughout that banishes all possible monotony from so many pieces in three time. There is a comically confused start to the A flat, Op. 64 No. 3 and an unholy muddle at the end of the final Waltz in E minor. Yet by and large these are preferable, more airborne readings than in the earlier 1934 set.

The Second Concerto, heard in Cortot's own arrangement or refurbishment with some mar ginal re-texturing here and there, shows him at his most excitingly rhetorical. Rearing and plunging through bravura passagework and revelling in every opportunity for the richest variety of voicing and texture, he makes the many years since the work's first performance roll away. Barbirolli's accompaniment may be rumbustious rather than subtle, yet the music sounds as if newly minted, alive in all its first audacious ardour and novelty.

The 1942 Preludes, as I have suggested, are more intriguing than convincing, less eloquent, fiery, or articulate than those of 1933. There is a disarming lightness to the popular No. 7 (its Mazurka affiliation charmingly highlighted), but No. 10 in C sharp minor is much less assured than a few years earlier; No. 15 commences sadly off pitch and No. 16 is less 'driven' or trenchant than in the earlier and greatly celebrated account. The bald forte chord that ends No. 21 is, again, uncharacteristic and No. 24, with its prophecy of boiling Rachmaninovian passions, ends in a state of confusion. Six Nocturnes are included and while hardly examples of the stylistic purity to which we have become accustomed in the postCortot era, are brilliantly alive with his own heady alternative. The lone C sharp minor Prelude, Op. 45 concludes the final disc leaving us with an example of Cortot's art at its most fervent and deeply introspective.

You will not easily find a more absorbing boxset of piano discs, or one that will be so frequently played while others languish in dusty oblivion, often examples of the dull respectability Cortot so demonstrably shunned. A photograph of' the artist is included, cigarette as always in hand, and every inch the debonair Frenchman. There are also tributes from Edwin Fisher, Alfred Brendel, Andras Schiff, Murray Perahia and Byron Janis, to name but a few. Cortot, who suffered painfully from a sense of his own imperfections, would have been gratified to know that future as well as contemporary admirers joined him in realizing that there are, perhaps, higher things in art than mere discretion. To logic, clarity, taste and finesse (always at the heart of all truly great French artistry) he added a wild re-creative passion and energy. With him Chopin's music leaves its earthly moorings far behind; as one writer put it "when Cortot is no more Chopin will die a second time".

-- Bryce Morrison, Gramophone [6/1992]
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Works on This Recording

1.
Berceuse for Piano in D flat major, B 154/Op. 57 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1844; Paris, France 
2.
Variations for Piano in B flat major on a theme from Hérold's "Ludovic", B 80/Op. 12 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1833; Paris, France 
3.
Etudes (12) for Piano, Op. 10: no 5 in G flat major "Black Keys" by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1830; Poland 
4.
Etudes (12) for Piano, Op. 25: no 9 in G flat major by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1832-1834; Paris, France 
5.
Etudes (12) for Piano, Op. 25: no 11 in A minor by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1834; Paris, France 
6.
Impromptu for Piano no 1 in A flat major, B 110/Op. 29 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1837; Paris, France 
7.
Impromptu for Piano no 2 in F sharp major, B 129/Op. 36 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1839; Paris, France 
8.
Etudes (12) for Piano, Op. 25: no 1 in A flat major by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1836; Paris, France 
9.
Waltzes (3) for Piano, B 164/Op. 64: no 2 in C sharp minor by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1846-1847; Paris, France 
10.
Berceuse for Piano in D flat major, B 154/Op. 57 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1844; Paris, France 
11.
Ballade for Piano no 1 in G minor, B 66/Op. 23 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1831-1835 
12.
Preludes (24) for Piano, Op. 28: no 1 in C major by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1836-1839; Paris, France 
13.
Preludes (24) for Piano, Op. 28: no 4 in E minor by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1836-1839; Paris, France 
14.
Preludes (24) for Piano, Op. 28: no 8 in F sharp minor by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1836-1839; Paris, France 
15.
Preludes (24) for Piano, Op. 28: no 12 in G sharp minor by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1836-1839; Paris, France 
16.
Preludes (24) for Piano, Op. 28: no 17 in A flat major by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1836-1839; Paris, France 
17.
Preludes (24) for Piano, Op. 28: no 19 in E flat major by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1836-1839; Paris, France 
18.
Preludes (24) for Piano, Op. 28: no 24 in D minor by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1836-1839; Paris, France 
19.
Sonata for Piano no 3 in B minor, B 155/Op. 58 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1844; Paris, France 
20.
Preludes (24) for Piano, Op. 28: no 12 in G sharp minor by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1836-1839; Paris, France 
21.
Nocturnes (3) for Piano, B 54/Op. 9: no 2 in E flat major by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1830-1831; Poland 
22.
Sonata for Piano no 2 in B flat minor, B 128/Op. 35 "Funeral March" by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1837-1839; Paris, France 
23.
Polonaise for Piano in A flat major, B 147/Op. 53 "Heroic" by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1842; Paris, France 
24.
Ballade for Piano no 1 in G minor, B 66/Op. 23 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1831-1835 
25.
Ballade for Piano no 2 in F major/a minor, B 102/Op. 38 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1836-1839; Paris, France 
26.
Ballade for Piano no 3 in A flat major, B 136/Op. 47 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1840-1841; Paris, France 
27.
Ballade for Piano no 4 in F minor, B 146/Op. 52 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1842; Paris, France 
28.
Fantasie for Piano in F minor/A flat major, B 137/Op. 49 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1841; Paris, France 
29.
Tarantella for Piano in A flat major, B 139/Op. 43 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1841; Paris, France 
30.
Barcarolle for Piano in F sharp major, B 158/Op. 60 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1845-1846; Paris, France 
31.
Etudes (12) for Piano, Op. 10 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1829-1833; Poland 
32.
Etudes (12) for Piano, Op. 25 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1832-1836; Paris, France 
33.
Waltz for Piano in E flat major, B 62/Op. 18 "Grande valse brillante" by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1831; Poland 
34.
Waltz for Piano in A flat major, B 131/Op. 42 "Grande Valse" by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: France; Paris, France 
35.
Waltzes (2) for Piano, Op. 69: no 2 in B minor, B 35 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1829; Poland 
36.
Waltz for Piano in E minor, B 56 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1830; Poland 
37.
Concerto for Piano no 2 in F minor, B 43/Op. 21 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Conductor:  Sir John Barbirolli
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1829-1830; Poland 
38.
Impromptu for Piano no 3 in G flat major, b 149/Op. 51 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1842; Paris, France 
39.
Waltz for Piano in E flat major, B 62/Op. 18 "Grande valse brillante" by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1831; Poland 
40.
Waltzes (3) for Piano, Op. 34: no 1 in A flat major, B 94 "Valse brillante" by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1835; Paris, France 
41.
Waltzes (3) for Piano, Op. 34: no 2 in A minor, B 64 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1831; Poland 
42.
Waltzes (3) for Piano, Op. 34: no 3 in F major, B 118 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1838; Paris, France 
43.
Waltz for Piano in A flat major, B 131/Op. 42 "Grande Valse" by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: France; Paris, France 
44.
Waltzes (3) for Piano, B 164/Op. 64: no 1 in D flat major "Minute Waltz" by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1846-1847; Paris, France 
45.
Waltzes (3) for Piano, B 164/Op. 64: no 2 in C sharp minor by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1846-1847; Paris, France 
46.
Waltzes (3) for Piano, B 164/Op. 64: no 3 in A flat major by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1846-1847; Paris, France 
47.
Waltzes (2) for Piano, Op. 69: no 1 in A flat major, B 95 "L'adieu" by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1835; Paris, France 
48.
Waltzes (2) for Piano, Op. 69: no 2 in B minor, B 35 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1829; Poland 
49.
Waltzes (3) for Piano, Op. 70: no 1 in G flat major, B 92 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1833; Paris, France 
50.
Waltzes (3) for Piano, Op. 70: no 2 in F minor, B 138 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1841; Paris, France 
51.
Waltzes (3) for Piano, Op. 70: no 3 in D flat major, B 40 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1829; Poland 
52.
Waltz for Piano in E minor, B 56 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1830; Poland 
53.
Preludes (24) for Piano, Op. 28 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1836-1839; Paris, France 
54.
Etudes (12) for Piano, Op. 10 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1829-1833; Poland 
55.
Etudes (12) for Piano, Op. 25 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1832-1836; Paris, France 
56.
Polish Songs (17), Op. 74: no 2, Spring, B 116 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1829-1847 
57.
Polish Songs (17), Op. 74: no 14, The ring, B 103 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1829-1847 
58.
Nocturnes (3) for Piano, Op. 15: no 1 in F major by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1830-1831; Poland 
59.
Nocturnes (3) for Piano, Op. 15: no 2 in F sharp major by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1830-1831; Poland 
60.
Nocturnes (2) for Piano, Op. 27: no 1 in C sharp minor, B 91 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1835; Paris, France 
61.
Nocturnes (2) for Piano, B 152/Op. 55: no 1 in F minor by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1843; Paris, France 
62.
Nocturnes (2) for Piano, B 152/Op. 55: no 2 in E flat major by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1843; Paris, France 
63.
Nouvelles Etudes (3) for Piano, B 130 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1839; Paris, France 
64.
Prelude for Piano in C sharp minor, B 141/Op. 45 by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Alfred Cortot (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1841; Paris, France 

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