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Britten: A Midsummer Night's Dream / Britten, London So


Release Date: 03/30/1990 
Label:  Decca   Catalog #: 425663   Spars Code: ADD 
Composer:  Benjamin Britten
Performer:  John Shirley-QuirkStephen TerryElizabeth HarwoodHelen Watts,   ... 
Conductor:  Benjamin Britten
Orchestra/Ensemble:  London Symphony Orchestra
Number of Discs: 2 
Recorded in: Mono 
Length: 2 Hours 24 Mins. 

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Notes and Editorial Reviews

This performance is sheer delight. Britten's conducting, more than anyone else's, conveys the sinister strata in the score which underlie the comic and fantastic. Elizabeth Harwood's Tytania is a lovely performance, both warm and unearthly.

If I had to name Britten's greatest opera, I should still hover between three, finally (I think) opting for Billy Budd. But I would have no hesitation in selecting A Midsummer Night's Dream as the one I enjoy most, even more than Albert Herring. As a successful operatic version of Shakespeare it ranks with Verdi. Why no one recorded the magical Glyndebourne production I shall never understand. But Britten's own performance, recorded in 1966, is sheer delight. His conducting, more
Read more than anyone else's conveys the sinister strata in the score which underlie the comic and fantastic.

Alfred Deller's unmatched Oberon, Owen Brannigan's Bottom, Thomas Hemsley's Demetrius, Norman Lumsden's Quince and David Kelly's Snug are the only survivors on record from the 1960 first performances. Sir Peter Pears sang Flute then but moved to Lysander on record, a pity, I think, for his comic impersonations were at once subtle and funny. Elizabeth Harwood's Tytania is a lovely performance, both warm and unearthly.

-- Gramophone [5/1990]
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Works on This Recording

1.
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op. 64 by Benjamin Britten
Performer:  John Shirley-Quirk (Bass Baritone), Stephen Terry (Boy Soprano), Elizabeth Harwood (Soprano),
Helen Watts (Alto), Owen Brannigan (Baritone), Norman Lumsden (Voice),
Kenneth MacDonald (), David [bass baritone] Kelly (), Keith Raggett (Voice),
Richard Dakin (Voice), John Pryer (Voice), Heather Harper (Soprano),
Josephine Veasey (Mezzo Soprano), Thomas Hemsley (Baritone), Peter Pears (Tenor),
Ian Wodehouse (Voice), Gordon Clark (Voice), Eric Alder (Voice),
Alfred Deller (Countertenor), Robert Tear (Tenor)
Conductor:  Benjamin Britten
Orchestra/Ensemble:  London Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1960; England 
Date of Recording: 1966 
Venue:  Walthamstow Assembly Hall, London 
Length: 144 Minutes 12 Secs. 
Language: English 

Sound Samples

A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 1: "Over Hill, Over Dale"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 1: "Oberon Is Passing Fell and Wrath"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 1: "Well, Go Thy Way"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 1: "How Now My Love?"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 1: "Be It On Lion, Bear, Or Wolf, Or Bull"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 1: "Welcome Wanderer!"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 1: "Is All Our Company Here?"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 1: "Fair Love, You Faint With Wand'ring In the Wood"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 1: "Through the Forest Have I Gone"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 1: "Stay, Though Thou Kill Me, Sweet Demetrius"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 1: "Come, Now A Roundel and A Fairy Song"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 1: "You Spotted Snakes With Double Tongue"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 1: "What Thou Seest When Thou Dost Wake"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 2: Introduction: The wood
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 2: "Are We All Met?"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 2: "I See Their Knavery"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 2: "Be Kind and Courteous To This Gentleman"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 2: "Hail, Mortal, Hail!"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 2: "I Have A Reas'nable Good Ear In Music"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 2: "How Now, Mad Spirit?"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 2: "Flower Of This Purple Dye"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 2: "Puppet? Why So?"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 2: "This Is Thy Negligence"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 2: "Up and down, Up and Down"
A Midsummer Night's Dream / Act 2: "On the Ground, Sleep Sound"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "My Gentle Robin, See'st Thou This Sweet Sight?"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "Helena! Hermi! Demetrius! Lysander!"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "When My Cue Comes, Call Me"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "Have You Sent To Bottom's House?"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "Now, Fair Hippolyta"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "If We Offend, It Is With Our Good Will"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "Gentles, Perchange You Wonder At This Show"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "In This Same Interlude It Doth Befall"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "O Grim-Look'd Night, O Night With Hue So Black"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "O Wall, Full Often Hast Thou Heard My Moans"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "You Ladies, You Whose Gentle Hearts Do Fear"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "This Lanthorn Doth the Horned Moon Present"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "Sweet Moon, I Thank Thee For Thy Sunny Beams"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "Asleep, My Love?"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "Come, Your Bergomask"
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op.64 / Act 3: "Now the Hungry Lion Roars"

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 An intriguing and excellent opera October 24, 2013 By Stephen Schoeman (Westfield, NJ) See All My Reviews "Benjamin Britten's A Midsummer Night's Dream is based on Shakespeare's work by the same name but, of course, set to music. And what music at that! The opera grows on you as it proceeds so that the final act with that play within a play is a sheer delight. A reminiscence of something Rossini or Mozart might have composed. There is the considerably added delight in the composer himself conducting this excellent performance! Perhaps made excellent because he conducted it! Think of what riches would have been uncovered had we recordings of Beethoven or Mozart or Haydn or Tchaikovsky or Massenet or Berlioz among others conducting their own works! Stephen Schoeman, Ph. D." Report Abuse
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