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Amber Waves- American Clarinet Music / Stoltzman, Vallecillo


Release Date: 12/16/2009 
Label:  Rca Victor Red Seal Catalog #: 62685   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  George GershwinLeonard BernsteinWilliam Thomas McKinleyClare Fisher,   ... 
Performer:  Irma VallecilloRichard Stoltzman
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
Length: 1 Hours 6 Mins. 

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This CD is reissued by ArkivMusic.

Notes and Editorial Reviews

Stoltzman plays in a uniquely personal style - bent notes and microtonal slides in near vocal effects. Magical!

Richard Stoltzman could be claimed as the James Galway of the clarinet. He has developed the personality of the instrument in new ways, often drawing on jazz effects, in what he regards as an American tradition. And he has a considerable following. He has recorded major pieces like the Corigliano Concerto (RCA, 4/89), but in this collection he's simply relaxing.

He starts with an ingenious arrangement of Gershwin's piano pieces, the Three Preludes, where the few extra effects in both clarinet and piano are completely idiomatic. Then there's Bernstein's early Sonata, another American classic,
Read more which Stoltzman has now recorded in Sid Ramin's orchestration (RCA, 12193).

W. T. McKinley makes his debut in the British catalogue with a recent, rather overblown, fourmovement Sonata and so does Clare Fisher with Sonatine. There's nothing very individual in either work, but Stoltzman obviously enjoys playing them. The real gems come when he goes deeper into jazz, especially Jimmy Rowles's The Peacocks, which was used in the soundtrack of Round Midnight. This brings out everything in Stoltzman's unique style - bent notes and microtonal slides in near vocal effects. Magical!

Dick Hyman is another jazz pianist and composer. He has recorded a complete Joplin and has written rags himself. His Clarinata is a red-hot encore with a soupy middle section. Finally Stoltzman plays his own arrangement of Amazing Grace, starting unaccompanied, and very touching it is too. Altogether an attractive collection, well recorded, with some uniquely personal playing.

-- Gramophone [9/1996]
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Works on This Recording

1.
Preludes (3) for Piano by George Gershwin
Performer:  Irma Vallecillo (Piano), Richard Stoltzman (Clarinet)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1926; USA 
Date of Recording: 01/1994 
Venue:  Mechanics Hall, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Length: 6 Minutes 20 Secs. 
2.
Sonata for Clarinet and Piano by Leonard Bernstein
Performer:  Irma Vallecillo (Piano), Richard Stoltzman (Clarinet)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1941-1942; USA 
Date of Recording: 01/1994 
Venue:  Mechanics Hall, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Length: 11 Minutes 35 Secs. 
3.
Sonata for Clarinet and Piano by William Thomas McKinley
Performer:  Richard Stoltzman (Clarinet), Irma Vallecillo (Piano)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: USA 
Date of Recording: 01/1994 
Venue:  Mechanics Hall, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Length: 25 Minutes 21 Secs. 
4.
Sonatine for Clarinet and Piano by Clare Fisher
Performer:  Richard Stoltzman (Clarinet), Irma Vallecillo (Piano)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: USA 
Date of Recording: 01/1994 
Venue:  Mechanics Hall, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Length: 21 Minutes 21 Secs. 
5.
Clarinata by Dick Hyman
Performer:  Irma Vallecillo (Piano), Richard Stoltzman (Clarinet)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: USA 
Date of Recording: 01/1994 
Venue:  Mechanics Hall, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Length: 2 Minutes 41 Secs. 
6.
The Peacocks by Jimmy Rowles
Performer:  Irma Vallecillo (Piano), Richard Stoltzman (Clarinet)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: USA 
Date of Recording: 01/1994 
Venue:  Mechanics Hall, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Length: 4 Minutes 21 Secs. 
7.
Amazing Grace by Traditional
Performer:  Irma Vallecillo (Piano), Richard Stoltzman (Clarinet)
Date of Recording: 01/1994 
Venue:  Mechanics Hall, Worcester, Massachusetts 
Length: 4 Minutes 6 Secs. 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 Stoltzman Terrific in Jazz-Influenced Clarinet Mu March 29, 2018 By Art Music Lady See All My Reviews "In this recent release from last May, Stoltzman plays a diverse program of music by jazz-influenced American composers from Gershwin (the oldest) to the still-living nonagenarian Dick Hyman. The only name I did not recognize in this lineup was that of William Thomas McKinley, who died in 2015. McKinley, also influenced by jazz, had a long association with Stoltzman and his fellow Tashi artist, pianist Peter Serkin, in addition to the great British cellist Colin Carr and American conductor Gerard Schwarz. One of the things that surprised and delighted me immediately was that he included the clarinet sonata by the great, and still underrated, American jazz and classical composer Clare Fischer, whose son Brent I am in touch with (for professional reasons) and who is still issuing new works and arrangements by his late father. Fischer had a discursive and varied musical mind, ranging in his influences from the jazz of Lennie Tristano and Bud Powell to Latin music (primarily Brazilian) and pop. I don’t know if Stoltzman had any personal contact with the late composer, but his performance here will surely bring a smile to Brent’s face. Fischer’s sonata also skillfully blends the jazz and classical worlds. Formally trained but bitten by the jazz bug as a young man, Fischer was forever toying with altered and extended chords, even in some of his more commercial work, and here used rich and fascinating chords in the opening movement, marked “Energetic.” Considering how little the clarinet was featured in post-1960 jazz, it’s notable that Fischer, who loved the instrument, continued to write both solo and concerted numbers for it, often using four- and five-voice clarinet choirs in his orchestrations (which his son Brent has continued to this day). Interestingly, this movement, too, ends with a low clarinet trill. In “Slowly and freely,” Fischer created a dark, moody piece in G-flat that floats through your mind, with sparse piano commentary on the clarinet’s meanderings, with a surprise transition at the end to E major. The last movement, “Metrically Steady With a Lilt,” is a decidedly bitonal 3/4 piece in Fischer’s more complex style, the pianist opening it up with a strange solo before the clarinet enters above it with commentary. All in all, a surprising and surprisingly good album with truly great performances of both the familiar and unfamiliar works. Clearly, one of Stoltzman’s finest and most interesting albums! --Lynn Rene Bayley, The Art Music Lounge" Report Abuse
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