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Bach: Cantatas For The Complete Liturgical Year Vol 9 / Kuijken, Samann, Petite Bande


Release Date: 11/24/2009 
Label:  Accent   Catalog #: 25309   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Petra NoskaiováGerlinde SamannChristoph GenzJan Van der Crabben
Conductor:  Sigiswald Kuijken
Orchestra/Ensemble:  La Petite Bande
Number of Discs: 1 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

This is a hybrid Super Audio CD playable on both regular and Super Audio CD players.

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BACH Cantatas: No. 61; 1,3,4 No. 36; 1,2,3,4 No. 62; 1, 2,3,4 No. 132 1,2,3,4 Sigiswald Kuijken, cond; Siri Thornhill (sop); 1 Read more class="ARIAL12"> Petra Noskaiová (alt); 2 Christoph Genz (ten); 3 Jan van der Crabben (bar); 4 La Petite Bande (period instruments) ACCENT 25309 (SACD: 76:54 Text and Translation)


Kuijken gives us Vvolume 9 of his series devoted to presenting one cantata for each Sunday and holy day of the year. With this collection, dedicated to the Sundays of Advent, a few problems arise. All of Bach’s Advent works are from Weimar (earlier) and Leipzig (later) as to be expected, except that in Leipzig the Advent cantata was given only on the first Sunday of the month, the other Sundays being sans cantata. His earlier sojourn in Weimar was different; there, each Sunday was expected to have a cantata provided for it. So what’s the big deal? Only that for Weimar, cantatas on the second, third, and forth Sundays alone have been preserved, and those for the second and third Sundays are known only by their texts—no music has survived. This necessitates presenting only one Advent cantata (for the first Sunday alone), or compromising a bit and stretching the Leipzig “first Sunday” cantatas to cover the Sundays that have no music for them.


It is this second solution that has been adopted here—wisely, in my opinion, for who wants to get overly dogmatic about a schedule when considering the music of Bach? So for the first and fourth Sundays we have Weimar cantatas, while two of the Leipzig “first Sunday” cantatas are given for the second and third Sundays, a solution that Bach himself would no doubt approve. No. 61, Now Come, Thou Savior of the Gentiles, starts the season on a festive note in its use of the first verse only of the hymn, “Veni, Redemptor Gentium,” by St. Ambrose of Milan incorporated into a French-style overture, adding a particularly joyous nature to the work. No. 36, Raise Thee Up with Joy, provides us with an example of Bach’s reworking of existing material. The piece has previous incarnations as a secular feast cantata from 1725, and twice more as BWV 36a and 36b, and again as a church cantata for Leipzig. There is also, as in the stricter chorale cantatas, no recitative.


No. 62 also uses the same Ambrosian hymn, Now Come, Thou Savior of the Gentiles, and is a genuine chorale cantata, based not on a Sunday gospel reading ,but instead on a specific church hymn, and features an opening movement that is exptremely complex and adventurous, very concertante in nature. Prepare Ye the Way, Prepare Ye the Highway! (No. 132) is another Weimar cantata that is also the only surviving Bach work for the fourth Sunday of Advent. It is also significant that though the text by noted cantata author Salomon Franck ends with a chorale verse, there is no music present for this text in the score. Most probably the page was lost or came out of the folio at some time. The same text was used for the closing chorale in cantata No. 164, Thou, Who in the Name of Christ Hath Taken , and so that piece is used here also—a commonly employed solution.


Standards remain high in this vividly recorded series, though for some reason the singing of Siri Thornhill really caught my attention this time around, her lovely instrument able to navigate Bach’s complexities with subtle and authoritative adroitness. Despite the questionable one-to-a-part dogmatism, this series is musically very fine.


FANFARE: Steven E. Ritter
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Works on This Recording

1.
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 61 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Petra Noskaiová (Alto), Gerlinde Samann (Soprano), Christoph Genz (Tenor),
Jan Van der Crabben (Baritone)
Conductor:  Sigiswald Kuijken
Orchestra/Ensemble:  La Petite Bande
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1714; Cöthen, Germany 
2.
Schwingt freudig euch empor, BWV 36 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Petra Noskaiová (Alto), Gerlinde Samann (Soprano), Christoph Genz (Tenor),
Jan Van der Crabben (Baritone)
Conductor:  Sigiswald Kuijken
Orchestra/Ensemble:  La Petite Bande
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1731; Leipzig, Germany 
3.
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 61 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Petra Noskaiová (Alto), Gerlinde Samann (Soprano), Christoph Genz (Tenor),
Jan Van der Crabben (Baritone)
Conductor:  Sigiswald Kuijken
Orchestra/Ensemble:  La Petite Bande
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1714; Cöthen, Germany 
4.
Bereitet die Wege, bereitet die Bahn!, BWV 132 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Petra Noskaiová (Alto), Gerlinde Samann (Soprano), Christoph Genz (Tenor),
Jan Van der Crabben (Baritone)
Conductor:  Sigiswald Kuijken
Orchestra/Ensemble:  La Petite Bande
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1715; Weimar, Germany 

Sound Samples

Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 61: Overture - Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland (Chorus)
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 61: Recitative: Der Heiland ist gekommen (Tenor)
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 61: Aria: Komm, Jesu, komm zu deiner Kirche (Tenor)
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 61: Recitative: Siehe, ich stehe vor der Tur (Bass)
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 61: Aria: Offne dich, mein ganzes Herze (Soprano)
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 61: Amen, Amen (Chorus)
Schwingt freudig euch empor, BWV 36: Schwingt freudig euch empor (Chorus)
Schwingt freudig euch empor, BWV 36: Chorale: Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland (Soprano, Alto)
Schwingt freudig euch empor, BWV 36: Aria: Die Liebe zieht mit sanften Schritten (Tenor)
Schwingt freudig euch empor, BWV 36: Chorale: Zwingt die Saiten in Cythara (Chorus)
Schwingt freudig euch empor, BWV 36: Aria: Willkommen, werter Schatz! (Bass)
Schwingt freudig euch empor, BWV 36: Chorale: Der du bist dem Vater gleich (Tenor)
Schwingt freudig euch empor, BWV 36: Aria: Auch mit gedampften, schwachen Stimmen (Soprano)
Schwingt freudig euch empor, BWV 36: Chorale: Lob sei Gott, dem Vater, ton (Chorus)
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 62: Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland (Chorus)
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 62: Aria: Bewundert, o Menschen, dies grosse Geheimnis (Tenor)
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 62: Recitative: So geht aus Gottes Herrlichkeit und Thron (Bass)
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 62: Aria: Streite, siege, starker Held! (Bass)
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 62: Recitative: Wir ehren diese Herrlichkeit (Soprano, Alto)
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 62: Chorale: Lob sei Gott, dem Vater, ton
Bereitet die Wege, bereitet die Bahn, BWV 132: Aria: Bereitet die Wege, bereitet die Bahn! (Soprano)
Bereitet die Wege, bereitet die Bahn, BWV 132: Recitative: Willst du dich Gottes Kind (Tenor)
Bereitet die Wege, bereitet die Bahn, BWV 132: Aria: Wer bist du? frage dein Gewissen (Bass)
Bereitet die Wege, bereitet die Bahn, BWV 132: Recitative: Ich will, mein Gott (Alto)
Bereitet die Wege, bereitet die Bahn, BWV 132: Aria: Christi Glieder, ach bedenket (Alto)
Bereitet die Wege, bereitet die Bahn, BWV 132: Ertot uns durch dein Gute (Chorus)

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