WGBH Radio WGBH Radio theclassicalstation.org

Haydn: The Complete Symphonies / Davies, Stuttgart CO


Release Date: 12/15/2009 
Label:  Sony   Catalog #: 744331   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Number of Discs: 37 
Recorded in: Stereo 
This title is currently unavailable.



Notes and Editorial Reviews



HAYDN Symphonies: Nos. 1–104; “A”; “B.” Sinfonia Concertante in B? Dennis Russell Davies, cond; Stuttgart CO SONY 8869743312 (37 CDs: 39:52:40) Live: Stuttgart 1998–2009


Another complete set of Haydn symphonies! I turned immediately to two favorites that have fared poorly on recordings: No. 90 in C, and the Sinfonia Concertante. The latter receives a vigorous, well-balanced performance in fine recorded sound, a combination unique in its recorded history. All four solo instruments are marvelous; Jochen Read more Müller-Brincken’s oboe is full and sweet, Akio Koyama’s bassoon wondrously rich and potent. Karl Ristenpart’s old Nonesuch LP was even livelier but was sabotaged by a scratchy violin and a screechy recording. At the opposite end of the scale, Bernstein’s Vienna Philharmonic was just too smooth, the solos having no punch. They and several other near misses may now be honorably retired. Aided by those sterling winds, Symphony No. 90 is also a triumph. This under-appreciated symphony is Haydn’s trumpets-and-drums, C-Major masterpiece. The performance is boisterous, even loud (as it should be), rolling along at a steady pace, trumpets and horns screaming, drums pounding. The incomparable finale, as joyous a piece as has ever been written, thrills. Davies observes every second of the four-and-a-half-measure rest following the false ending. Fortunately, he does not take the second repeat in the Dover score, which I cannot imagine Haydn writing—a false ending just doesn’t make sense the second time around. Two outstanding performances remain in mind: Leslie Jones’s bright, chipper Nonesuch LP, with a sparkling harpsichord continuo, and a Luciano Berio (!) New York Philharmonic live performance, with Bernstein-like panache and incomparable wind soloists. Neither diminishes the virtues of this new recording.


Now let’s get down to basics. These are live performances given from 1998 to 2009 at Mercedes Benz Center Stuttgart. Sony supplies no further discographic information, such as the order in which the symphonies were recorded. Schedules for 2007–2009 may be viewed on the Internet: Most concerts included three symphonies plus a solo vehicle by another composer; each concert was given twice, on consecutive evenings. A puzzle: The “Center” is a glorified automobile showroom that opened in 2005, so where were the earlier concerts held? We hear from 20 to 30 seconds of applause at the end of each symphony (followed by a long pause before the start of the next one—thank you, Sony); the audience is otherwise very quiet. A confusing orchestral roster lists 71 strings, including 12 double basses—some chamber orchestra! I believe that was pared down to 30 (8/6/10/4/2) for these performances, less for the early symphonies; a posed photo shows the conductor surrounded by 14 strings and five winds. A brief history of the orchestra says that “it became a pioneer of historic performing practices” and mentions “high quality Baroque bows,” but these are modern instruments with no Baroque bows in sight. A potent bassoon and a delicate harpsichord form the continuo.


Why 37 CDs, when Adam Fischer took only 33? Davies takes many more repeats, his tempos tend to be slower, and the applause adds up. The discs run from 44:23 to 81:40 (Sony’s written timings can be way off) averaging almost 65 minutes. Eight of the symphonies run more than half an hour; No. 43, with every repeat including both in the Menuet da capo, is stretched to 34:10. I listened to everything, but not always under ideal conditions: A tight deadline made the walkman and car radio necessities, without benefit of a score. To break up the exquisite monotony, I attended a delectable performance of Haydn’s Il mondo della luna , and, a week later, a poor one of the Sinfonia Concertante, which reinforced how difficult it is and how miraculous Davies’ recording is. The symphonies are presented in order of composition, as best we know it today, which varies from Hoboken’s catalog. An elegant outer box is padded with an inch and a half of cardboard spacers to make it an exact cube; despite the wasted space, the box should fit into most CD shelves. Single discs are enclosed in thin, glossy cardboard envelopes; ironically, the back of each displays a photo of the Haydnsaal at Eisenstadt, the site of Fischer’s recordings. Sony divides the symphonies into six color-coded groups.


“Early Symphonies” (four CDs) come mostly from the composer’s employment by Count Morzin. Haydn got off to a great start: The First Symphony is a winner. Davies’ opening Presto is not as fast as Fischer or Derek Solomons, and his horns are a bit recessed, but the performance as a whole may be preferable, with that gorgeous oboe balanced ideally with the strings. While there is no doubt that period instruments suit these early symphonies best, Davies makes a fine case for his ensemble. Horns come to the fore on CD 2 (Nos. 4, 27, 10, and 20), and the performances impress: Seldom as aggressive as Fischer, Davies produces more lucid readings, with a smoother string body and those always lovely woodwinds. A momentary thought says that the Davies are less “Haydnish” than the Fischer (more Mozartean, perhaps?), but they are just as fine. Davies’ andantes are consistently lovely, preferable to those in all other recordings of these early symphonies. Prestos seem to gain momentum as we go through the first CDs. For No. 20, the earliest of Haydn’s many trumpets-and-drums spectaculars, Davies has plenty of punch, both in the opening Allegro molto and the final Presto. By No. 25, at the end of the third CD, Davies—and Haydn—are going full blast. Horns are now more daring, string attacks crisper. These 17 early symphonies demonstrate that Haydn was constantly experimenting and that he produced a number of gorgeous symphonies before joining the Esterházy establishment.


“The First Symphonies Written for Prince Esterházy” (seven CDs) begin with No. 15 in D, where the clean, crisp attacks and instrumental felicities of the Stuttgart ensembles surpass even the delightful performance by Kevin Mallon and the Toronto Chamber Orchestra on Naxos. Fischer’s Menuet is slow and lackadaisical, unusual for him. “Morning,” “Noon,” and “Night” are well played by Davies’ group, the many solos integrated into the ensemble rather than spotlighted. The Adagio of Symphony No. 12, for strings alone, is beautifully realized, claiming attention as never before. “A” and “B” are full-fledged Haydn symphonies, left off Hoboken’s list because they were then classified as a divertimento and a string quartet. Most conductors, including Fischer, treat them as stepchildren; they blossom in Davies’ performances. His readings of the four-horn symphonies No. 31 (“Hornsignal”) and its predecessor No. 72 are vibrant and extroverted, with glorious horns and, in No. 31, a sparkling solo flute. This performance makes even the superb Mackerras on Telarc sound a bit stodgy. The opening Adagio of No. 22, “Der Philosoph,” receives a powerful performance, with a strong if slightly raucous English horn (Fischer’s is recessed). Davies outraces both Fischer and Goberman in the Presto finale. From here on in, there are too many highlights to mention them all.


“The Storm and Stress Symphonies” take six CDs. I chose the opening Allegro con spirito of Symphony No. 41 in C to make detailed A/B/C comparisons among Davies, Fischer, and Max Goberman, whose early stereo LP set the standard. None of them take the second repeat (Davies often does elsewhere). Davies is noticeably slower than Goberman; Fischer starts off at Goberman’s tempo but soon revs it up to a Vivace; movement timings are 6:38, 6:10, and 5:56 respectively. Davies’ strings are smooth and beautiful, Goberman’s are a bit dull, and Fischer’s quite harsh. Goberman employs high horns in C-alt; Fischer uses rather blatty trumpets. Sony claims that Davies does not use period instruments, but his trumpets (if that’s what they are) sound more like Goberman’s instruments than Fischer’s. Davies is the most cleanly played; Fischer is quite scrappy, including a messy attack on the opening chord. There are two fermatas in the score, during which Fischer’s solo violin and then oboe execute little cadential flourishes—a lovely touch. Over all, Fischer’s performance is more exciting, but Davies and Goberman come across as more musical.


Such differences appear throughout the pre-1784 symphonies (Nos. 1–78) and are especially notable in the C-Major, trumpets-and-drums symphonies. Fischer and Thomas Fey often chose very rapid tempos in the Esterházy symphonies, sacrificing not only accuracy but some of the richness of the music. Davies’ relaxed tempos give us a more comprehensive view as well as allowing superior execution. Many movements that were not especially memorable now make their points more fully. Admittedly, this is a relative advantage; had we been hearing these symphonies Davies’ way, we would now discover new meanings from Fischer and Fey, and a different set of movements might emerge. Davies’ horns are prominent in No. 65, and he plays every repeat, but the symphony just doesn’t gel. Dorati—whose set I’m not fond of—makes more sense of this strange work than anyone. No. 48 in C, “Maria Theresia,” is sensational: fast, crisp, vibrant, sparkling—even more so than the great Goberman. Davies really swings in the finale. This rivals Bernstein’s “Bear” as one of the finest-ever Haydn performances. The “Trauer” is a disappointment, well played but lacking any sense of mourning. Although Sony stresses the “Sturm und Drang” aspects of the minor-key 1767–1772 symphonies, these performances do not. A brilliant performance of No. 46 in B Major, with horns blazing in a high register, rounds out this group.


Sony calls Nos. 50 to 75 “Symphonies for Entertainment Purposes” (Sinfonien zur Unterhalting). Davies’ virtues—playing it straight with admirable ensemble qualities—are not enough to bring some of the dull works back from the dead. The brilliant, exciting No. 56 in C receives a slow, stately performance that turns it into a different piece, weighty, powerful, and elegant, its moving Adagio highlighted by the gorgeous bassoon. Even without the opening movement’s second repeat, this performance runs 33:30. Davies cannot match Fey’s razor-sharp wit in No. 60, “Il distratto,” nor the feeling that the orchestra really is losing its grip. For once, a Davies Andante is heavy-handed—his joke, perhaps. The brilliant Stuttgart winds bring No. 68 to vivacious life, and the “Laudon” (No. 69) becomes a gem in Davies’ rhythmically incisive reading. The Menuet of No. 61 is a delight: Its Trio is a long oboe solo; the second time through he expands a trill into a minor cadenza. It’s a wonderful touch that enlivens a “facile” work (Robbins Landon), the kind of thing I wish Davies did more often. The Vivace of “L’Impériale” (No. 53) is slow to get going but eventually comes close to the pizzazz of the Stokowski mono LP. There are at least three totally different finales to this symphony. Davies plays “Version A, found in the Esterházy parts”; Fischer plays “Version B, found in the majority of old manuscripts” (both in the Eulenberg score); Stokowski plays still another. Although the “chasse” finale of Symphony No. 73, with trumpets and drums, is convincing, Davies’ first three movements are stodgy. Fischer’s muscular, bumptious performances light a flame under Symphonies 70, 71, 73, 74, and 75; they are some of the best things in his set.


The next six CDs are called “Symphonies for the Public at Large” (Haydn was no longer writing exclusively for Prince Esterházy). With Nos. 76, 77, and 78, Haydn—and Davies—are coming out of the doldrums. Haydn is not yet back to his full vigor, but the music is lovely. Fischer’s quicker tempos are attractive, but his strings are going through another rough period. Davies leans heavily into No. 80 in D Minor, as I wish he had done for the earlier minor-key symphonies, and the final Presto sparkles. No. 81 in G gets my vote as the best of Haydn’s “unknown” symphonies, the equal of any he wrote; Davies imbues it with glorious life, far eclipsing both Fischer and Mackerras. Davies’ “Paris” Symphonies suffer from comparisons with Bernstein’s inexhaustible élan and the golden acoustic of the Vienna Musikverein for Kristjan Järvi ( Fanfare 33:4). Most are well played, but “La Reine” is a disaster: The opening chord has been excised, the Adagio introduction is played Andante, and the ensuing Vivace is barely faster than the introduction. Furthermore, Davies seems to employ few strings in these grand symphonies written specifically for a huge Parisian ensemble. Wind/string balances work well in a superb No. 84, but ff violins carrying the main theme of No. 86’s Allegro spiritoso are buried by the merely f tutti accompaniment—a shame, because the performance of the entire symphony is so sharply focused and superbly executed. As for “The Bear,” as excellent as it is, it’s just not Bernstein.


For the next dozen symphonies, this Sony set is pure glory—forget about Fischer and Dorati. No. 88 in G is the Haydn symphony that everyone does well; nowhere else is his orchestral blend so winning. Davies joins the long list, and the crowd loves it. With the aid of that gorgeous bassoon, all normal repeats, and pristine execution of the finale’s counterpoint, the gentle, charming No. 89 in F becomes a match for its illustrious predecessor. Davies’ melting second violins and rousing finale rescue No. 91 in E? as well. How could we ever have thought that Haydn produced anything less than a masterpiece at this stage in his career? Propelling these superb but lesser-known symphonies (81, 89, 90, 91) into the limelight is a major triumph of this set. Led by brilliant trumpets, Davies’ “Oxford” outdoes even the classic Szell recordings: Davies is livelier and cleaner (due to the recorded sound); he lets his soloists shine, whereas Szell makes them blend into the ensemble. Szell’s Presto finale now sounds too comfortable, and he doesn’t take the repeat, which Davies does.


“The London Symphonies”: Davies’ easygoing “Miracle” is charming, but the Stuttgart acoustics deny him the graceful airiness of the Concertgebouw under Haitink or Colin Davis. No. 95 has a punch and urgency appropriate for Haydn’s final minor-key symphony. No. 93 is also superb, the orchestra every bit as elegant as Cantelli’s NBC Symphony. No. 98 is newly revealed, at slow tempos; its final coda does include the cembalo part. Again and again Davies demonstrates—as does Bernstein—that a Vivace or Presto can be even livelier at a less hectic pace. One gets the impression of a confident maestro and a superbly trained ensemble of sterling soloists sailing along at the top of their game. There are no controversial moments, yet the performances are anything but routine; every movement scintillates. Listening, one thinks: Why didn’t Szell think of that? How much more vibrant than Davis! Why did Bernstein have to play around with that phrase? That’s not to say that recordings of the first set of “London” Symphonies by those conductors do not have their own unique wonders—only that one never misses them when listening to Dennis Russell Davies. I know no higher praise.


The second set of “London” symphonies begins with No. 99, in which Davies does not have the solidity and fire of Szell or Bernstein. And then comes a major meltdown: The “Military” Symphony lacks vitality; everything is slow, attacks are mushy, and the janissary music is perfunctory. This sounds like a different orchestra—and conductor. No. 102 also lacks punch and point; no one can equal Bernstein here. No. 103 opens with a virtuoso drum roll cadenza, which I dislike because it is a mismatch with the somber music that follows—Haydn wrote a single, prolonged, pp note. The playing is otherwise clean but uninspired. In the symphonies after No. 98, Davies’ tempos no longer convince; the opening Allegro of No. 104 is just plain slow. The Andante is impressively potent, and the oboe/bassoon pair provides a delicious Trio. There are fine moments in the finale but also some awkward ones. How could this happen, when things were going so well? The schedules provide a possible clue: Nos. 99, 100, 102, 103, and 104 were each the final number on an evening’s program, and all were in the Mercedes Center. Perhaps the players were tiring. (Suggestion for future live-recording projects: Change the order of performance on the second night.) The “Clock” was recorded sometime before 2007, probably—judging by the recorded sound—in a different venue. It is thoroughly back on track, a lovely performance in sparkling sound. Once again, Davies’ relaxed tempos convince, the playing is gorgeous, and the music has plenty of snap. Haydn is Haydn again!


Sony’s recorded sound is consistently clean, rich, and well balanced, with every instrument forward, but the acoustic ambience varies enormously (two or more recording sites?), sometimes lacking both warmth and transparency, sometimes (those late “Londons” in the Mercedes Center) bright, shallow, and tinny. Fischer enjoys a lovely, reverberant acoustic that is not often managed well; his recordings are inconsistent, with some instruments—even in solo turns—distant. Decca’s analog sound for Dorati is sweet and pleasant; a lack of depth or color is mostly his orchestra. Sony’s notes (in English and German) are interesting but a bit careless: Haydn wrote not one but two minor-key symphonies before 1768 (No. 34 as well as the cited No. 39). There are no movement timings, in the booklet or on individual slipcases.


In an unusual step, I’d like to comment on some reviews, professional and otherwise, that I stumbled across on the Internet while looking for data on the live performances. There have been both positive and negative ones. I could understand if someone disliked Davies’ generally slow tempos, but no one mentioned that. Few of the writers seem to have listened to the entire set. Artistic judgments are personal, of course, but I suspect that two who prefer the Dorati set are indulging in the familiar phenomenon of “this is the way I learned it (or worse: this is the one I own), so this is the way it should go.” My view is that the Doratis are too vanilla: none terrible, none superb. Finally, to criticize such a huge series of performances for being “inconsistent” about repeats is ludicrous: Would it be better to play all repeats (as a purist might prefer), or no repeats (as a marketing executive might want), rather than exercising artistic judgment? Davies had his reasons for every decision, and—given 20 more pages—I could offer my views in most cases: This movement is not up to Haydn’s best, and a repeat will only emphasize that fact. That movement is lovely but not well known, so play the repeat. This repeat contributes to the movement’s balance or its structural integrity, so it is a must. To play the second repeat in No. 56 would extend the symphony well beyond 37 minutes, and the movement already contains much internal repetition. Or, as stated above, repeating a false ending makes no sense.


To sum up: These modern-instrument performances run counter to much of today’s period-practice fashion. They boast elegant, potent Allegros, incomparably lovely Andantes and Adagios, and a high level of ensemble accuracy and polish. They can, however, be a bit short of humor or sentiment. Dorati provided reasonable representations of every Haydn symphony; Fischer added superb performances of many early and middle ones. Davies has it all: marvelous performances of symphonies early, middle, and late, including many of the finest ever. There are barely more than a dozen duds among these 107 performances, an amazing achievement. This set can currently be found for less than two dollars per disc on Amazon. Grab it quickly! Sony is the fastest gun in the West for deleting all but its best sellers, and the going price is sure to rise.


FANFARE: James H. North
Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Symphony no 1 in D major, H 1 no 1 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1759; Vienna, Austria 
2.
Symphony no 2 in C major, H 1 no 2 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1764; Austria 
3.
Symphony no 3 in G major, H 1 no 3 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1762; Austria 
4.
Symphony no 4 in D major, H 1 no 4 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1762; Austria 
5.
Symphony no 5 in A major, H 1 no 5 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1762; Austria 
6.
Symphony no 6 in D major, H 1 no 6 "Le Matin" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: ?1761; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
7.
Symphony no 7 in C major, H 1 no 7 "Le Midi" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1761; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
8.
Symphony no 8 in G major, H 1 no 8 "Le Soir" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: ?1761; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
9.
Symphony no 9 in C major, H 1 no 9 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: ?1762; Austria 
10.
Symphony no 10 in D major, H 1 no 10 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1766; Vienna, Austria 
11.
Symphony no 11 in E flat major, H 1 no 11 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1769; Austria 
12.
Symphony no 12 in E major, H 1 no 12 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1763; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
13.
Symphony no 13 in D major, H 1 no 13 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1763; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
14.
Symphony no 14 in A major, H 1 no 14 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1764; Austria 
15.
Symphony no 15 in D major, H 1 no 15 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1764; Austria 
16.
Symphony no 16 in B flat major, H 1 no 16 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1766; Austria 
17.
Symphony no 17 in F major, H 1 no 17 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1766; Austria 
18.
Symphony no 18 in G major, H 1 no 18 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1766; Austria 
19.
Symphony no 19 in D major, H 1 no 19 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1766; Austria 
20.
Symphony no 20 in C major, H 1 no 20 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1766; Austria 
21.
Symphony no 21 in A major, H 1 no 21 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1764; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
22.
Symphony no 22 in E flat major, H 1 no 22 "Philosopher" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1764; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
23.
Symphony no 23 in G major, H 1 no 23 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1764; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
24.
Symphony no 24 in D major, H 1 no 24 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1764; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
25.
Symphony no 25 in C major, H 1 no 25 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1766; Austria 
26.
Symphony no 26 in D minor, H 1 no 26 "Lamentatione" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1770; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
27.
Symphony no 27 in G major, H 1 no 27 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1766; Austria 
28.
Symphony no 28 in A major, H 1 no 28 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1765; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
29.
Symphony no 29 in E major, H 1 no 29 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1765; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
30.
Symphony no 30 in C major, H 1 no 30 "Alleluia" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1765; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
31.
Symphony no 31 in D major, H 1 no 31 "Hornsignal" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1765; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
32.
Symphony no 32 in C major, H 1 no 32 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1766; Austria 
33.
Symphony no 33 in C major, H 1 no 33 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1767; Austria 
34.
Symphony no 34 in D minor, H 1 no 34 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1767; Austria 
35.
Symphony no 35 in B flat major, H 1 no 35 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1767; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
36.
Symphony no 36 in E flat major, H 1 no 36 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1769; Austria 
37.
Symphony no 37 in C major, H 1 no 37 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1758; Vienna, Austria 
38.
Symphony no 38 in C major, H 1 no 38 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1769; Austria 
39.
Symphony no 39 in G minor, H 1 no 39 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1770; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
40.
Symphony no 40 in F major, H 1 no 40 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1763; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
41.
Symphony no 41 in C major, H 1 no 41 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1770; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
42.
Symphony no 42 in D major, H 1 no 42 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1771; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
43.
Symphony no 43 in E flat major, H 1 no 43 "Mercury" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1772; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
44.
Symphony no 44 in E minor, H 1 no 44 "Trauer" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1772; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
45.
Symphony no 45 in F sharp minor, H 1 no 45 "Farewell" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1772; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
46.
Symphony no 46 in B major, H 1 no 46 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1772; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
47.
Symphony no 47 in G major, H 1 no 47 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1772; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
48.
Symphony no 48 in C major, H 1 no 48 "Maria Theresia" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1769; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
49.
Symphony no 49 in F minor, H 1 no 49 "La Passione" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1768; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
50.
Symphony no 50 in C major, H 1 no 50 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1773; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
51.
Symphony no 51 in B flat major, H 1 no 51 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1774; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
52.
Symphony no 52 in C minor, H 1 no 52 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1774; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
53.
Symphony no 53 in D major, H 1 no 53 "L'Impériale" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: ?1778-79; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
54.
Symphony no 54 in G major, H 1 no 54 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1774; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
55.
Symphony no 55 in E major, H 1 no 55 "The Schoolmaster" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1774; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
56.
Symphony no 56 in C major, H 1 no 56 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1774; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
57.
Symphony no 57 in C major, H 1 no 57 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1774; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
58.
Symphony no 58 in F major, H 1 no 58 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1775; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
59.
Symphony no 59 in A major, H 1 no 59 "Fire" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1769; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
60.
Symphony no 60 in C major, H 1 no 60 "Il distratto" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1774; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
61.
Symphony no 61 in D major, H 1 no 61 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1776; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
62.
Symphony no 62 in D major, H 1 no 62 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1781; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
63.
Symphony no 63 in C major, H 1 no 63 "La Roxelane" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1781; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
64.
Symphony no 64 in A major, H 1 no 64 "Tempora mutantur" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1778; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
65.
Symphony no 65 in A major, H 1 no 65 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1778; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
66.
Symphony no 66 in B flat major, H 1 no 66 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1779; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
67.
Symphony no 67 in F major, H 1 no 67 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1779; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
68.
Symphony no 68 in B flat major, H 1 no 68 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1779; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
69.
Symphony no 69 in C major, H 1 no 69 "Laudon" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1779; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
70.
Symphony no 70 in D major, H 1 no 70 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1778-1779; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
71.
Symphony no 71 in B flat major, H 1 no 71 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1780; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
72.
Symphony no 72 in D major, H 1 no 72 no 72 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1765; Austria 
73.
Symphony no 73 in D major, H 1 no 73 "La Chasse" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1782; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
74.
Symphony no 74 in E flat major, H 1 no 74 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1781; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
75.
Symphony no 75 in D major, H 1 no 75 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1781; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
76.
Symphony no 76 in E flat major, H 1 no 76 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: ?1782; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
77.
Symphony no 77 in B flat major, H 1 no 77 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: ?1782; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
78.
Symphony no 78 in C minor, H 1 no 78 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: ?1782; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
79.
Symphony no 79 in F major, H 1 no 79 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1784; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
80.
Symphony no 80 in D minor, H 1 no 80 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1784; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
81.
Symphony no 81 in G major, H 1 no 81 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1784; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
82.
Symphony no 82 in C major, H 1 no 82 "The Bear" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
83.
Symphony no 83 in G minor, H 1 no 83 "The Hen" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1785; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
84.
Symphony no 84 in E flat major, H 1 no 84 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
85.
Symphony no 85 in B flat major, H 1 no 85 "La Reine" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: ?1785; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
86.
Symphony no 86 in D major, H 1 no 86 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
87.
Symphony no 87 in A major, H 1 no 87 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1785; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
88.
Symphony no 88 in G major, H 1 no 88 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: circa 1787 ; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
89.
Symphony no 89 in F major, H 1 no 89 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1787; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
90.
Symphony no 90 in C major, H 1 no 90 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1788; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
91.
Symphony no 91 in E flat major, H 1 no 91 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1788; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
92.
Symphony no 92 in G major, H 1 no 92 "Oxford" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1789; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
93.
Symphony no 93 in D major, H 1 no 93 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1791; London, England 
94.
Symphony no 94 in G major, H 1 no 94 "Surprise" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1791; London, England 
95.
Symphony no 95 in C minor, H 1 no 95 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1791; London, England 
96.
Symphony no 96 in D major, H 1 no 96 "Miracle" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1791; London, England 
97.
Symphony no 97 in C major, H 1 no 97 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1792; London, England 
98.
Symphony no 98 in B flat major, H 1 no 98 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1792; London, England 
99.
Symphony no 99 in E flat major, H 1 no 99 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1793; Vienna, Austria 
100.
Symphony no 100 in G major, H 1 no 100 "Military" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1793-1794; London, England 
101.
Symphony no 101 in D major, H 1 no 101 "Clock" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1793-1794; London, England 
102.
Symphony no 102 in B flat major, H 1 no 102 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1794; London, England 
103.
Symphony no 103 in E flat major, H 1 no 103 "Drumroll" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1795; London, England 
104.
Symphony no 104 in D major, H 1 no 104 "London" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Dennis Russell Davies
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1795; London, England 

Customer Reviews

Be the first to review this title
Review This Title
Review This Title Share on Facebook




YOU MUST BE A SUBSCRIBER TO LISTEN TO ARKIVMUSIC STREAMING.
TRY IT NOW FOR FREE!
Sign up now for two weeks of free access to the world's best classical music collection. Keep listening for only $19.95/month - thousands of classical albums for the price of one! Learn more about ArkivMusic Streaming
Aleady a subscriber? Sign In