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Leshnoff: Symphony No. 4 "Heichalos," Guitar Concerto & Starburst / Guerrero, Nashville Symphony


Release Date: 05/02/2019 
Label:  Naxos   Catalog #: 8559809  
Composer:  Jonathan Leshnoff
Performer:  Jason Vieaux
Conductor:  Giancarlo Guerrero
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Nashville Symphony Orchestra
Number of Discs: 1 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

Distinguished by The New York Times as “a leader of contemporary American lyricism,” composer Jonathan Leshnoff is renowned for his music’s striking harmonies, structural complexity and powerful themes. Leshnoff’s works have been performed by more than 60 orchestras worldwide, including commissions from Carnegie Hall, the Atlanta, Baltimore, Dallas, Kansas City, and Nashville Symphony orchestras, the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, and the IRIS and Philadelphia orchestras. Jonathan Leshnoff’s Symphony No. 4 is a powerful new work written for the Violins of Hope, a collection of restored instruments that survived the Holocaust. The composer draws inspiration from an ancient Jewish mystical text, Heichalos, to explore spiritual and ethical Read more questions at the heart of the Jewish experience. This world premiere recording also features his energetic Starburst and his Guitar Concerto, a stunning virtuoso showcase for soloist Jason Vieaux.

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REVIEW:

There is much to like about this music, but it is not perhaps as much a look ahead as a glance, effectively, at the past, a summing up and reaction to where we have been in music that nonetheless finds original ways to revisit forms by now long established. This however is by no means institutional music but rather a living breathing thing. Each work stands alone as an offering for our appreciation and pleasure. Nicely done!

– Gapplegate Classical-Modern Music Review Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Symphony No. 4 "Heichalos" by Jonathan Leshnoff
Conductor:  Giancarlo Guerrero
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Nashville Symphony Orchestra
Period: Contemporary 
Written: United States 
2.
Guitar Concerto by Jonathan Leshnoff
Performer:  Jason Vieaux (Guitar)
Conductor:  Giancarlo Guerrero
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Nashville Symphony Orchestra
Period: Contemporary 
Written: United States 
3.
Starburst by Jonathan Leshnoff
Conductor:  Giancarlo Guerrero
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Nashville Symphony Orchestra
Period: Contemporary 
Written: United States 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 Leshnoff symphony a qualified success February 10, 2020 By Ralph Graves (Hood, VA) See All My Reviews "Jonathan Leshnoff is a talented composer. And his fourth symphony is a well-constructed work. It has engaging themes, nicely shaped melodies, and a fresh take on tonality. But for me, it didn't have the desired effect. The liner notes explain the concept of the work in great detail. The project Violins for Hope refurbishes instruments that survived the Holocaust -- even when their owners did not. These instruments that were once heard in concentration camps now ring out in concert hall. That's a concept that can stir powerful emotions. Leshnoff's symphony was composed for the Nashville Symphony playing the Violins of Hope. Logically, Leshnoff draws on Jewish culture for his work. The liner notes carefully delineate all the Hebrew references and inspirations in the symphony. On paper, it's a beautiful and inspiring concept. But I didn't hear any of it. The Violins of Hope, despite their history, are just violins - and they sound like any other violin. Leshnoff's symphony, despite all the Hebrew-inspired elements, doesn't sound especially Jewish. I liked the symphony, and the Nashville Symphony performs it well. But I would have had the same reaction even if I hadn't read the liner notes. The recording also includes two additional works by Leshnoff - the Guitar Concerto and his short orchestral work Starburst. Neither has an elaborate backstory, and neither needs one. Jason Vieux plays the concerto with fire and spirit. I especially enjoyed his rapid passage-work and the ringing quality of his held notes. In the end, it's not the extra-musical elements that matter, only the sound. And based solely on the sound, I can recommend this recording." Report Abuse
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