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Gipps: Orchestral Works / Gamba, BBC National Orchestra of Wales


Release Date: 09/07/2018 
Label:  Chandos   Catalog #: 20078  
Composer:  Ruth Gipps
Conductor:  Rumon Gamba
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC National Orchestra of Wales
Number of Discs: 1 
In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews

The unjustly neglected and often dissident music of Ruth Gipps is with this album finding all the resonance it deserves by Rumon Gamba and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, having already championed many British composers from the twentieth century with their series devoted to British Tone Poems and Overtures from the British Isles. While, not surprisingly, there are echoes of the most popular composers of the time – Sibelius, Walton, and Vaughan Williams – the music is notable for its personal voice, confident conception, and vivid writing for the orchestra. Gipps herself actually felt her best works were those for orchestra. In a programme of contrasting impressions and emotions, Symphonies Nos 2 and 4, the former inspired by the Read more Second World War, offer an approachable tuneful idiom. They are complemented by the lyrical, shorter Song for Orchestra and the early tone poem Knight in Armour, premiered at the last Night of the Proms in 1942. Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Symphony No. 4, Op. 61 by Ruth Gipps
Conductor:  Rumon Gamba
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC National Orchestra of Wales
Period: 20th Century 
Written: England 
2.
Knight in Armour, Op. 8 by Ruth Gipps
Conductor:  Rumon Gamba
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC National Orchestra of Wales
Period: 20th Century 
Written: England 
3.
Symphony No. 2, Op. 30 by Ruth Gipps
Conductor:  Rumon Gamba
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC National Orchestra of Wales
Period: 20th Century 
Written: England 
4.
Song for Orchestra, Op. 33 by Ruth Gipps
Conductor:  Rumon Gamba
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC National Orchestra of Wales
Period: 20th Century 
Written: England 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 Old-fashioned but well-crafted May 3, 2019 By Ralph Graves (Hood, VA) See All My Reviews "The 21st Century seems to be the time for the re-discovery of women composers. Obscurity could result from many factors. Some careers were frustrated by societal conventions, as with Amy Beach. Sometimes race was the issue, as with Florence Price. In the case of Ruth Gipps, it seemed to have been something not uncommon with the fate of many male composers. Her music simply fell out of fashion. Gipps was an extremely talented oboist, pianist, and composer. By all accounts, she was a virtual dynamo -- performing, composing, and organizing. She founded the Londen Repertoire Orchestra (1955) and the Chanticler Orchestra (1961) to promote young performers and new music. Yet her own music remained true to the ideals of the English Music Renaissance. She had studied with Ralph Vaughan Willams, and her work builds on the foundations he established. Gipps firmly rejected serialism and atonality. After WWII, her music was seen as simply too old-fashioned to be relevant. Listening to Gipps' work in the 21st Century, I didn't hear that at all. Her Symphony No. 2 in B major (1945) is a tightly constructed single movement work. Her harmonies often resolve modally, accentuating the "Englishness" of her melodies. Gipps dedicated her Fourth Symphony to Arthur Bliss. This 1972 work is still tonal, but the harmonies are more thickly textured. Gipps' structural organization is impeccable, and her use of timbre and instrumental color inspired. The symphony premiered the same year as George Crumb's "Makrokosmos, Volume I," Steve Reich's "Clapping Music," and Einojuhani Rautavaara's Cantus Arcticus. So, yes, in context Gipps does sound old-fashioned. But taken on its own merits, her music has the power to move the listener emotionally (it did for me). Rumon Gamba and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales seem fully invested in these works. Their performances bring out the restless vitality of Ruth Gipps and revel in her use of orchestral color." Report Abuse
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