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Moyzes: Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4 / Slovak, Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra


Release Date: 08/10/2018 
Label:  Naxos   Catalog #: 8573651  
Composer:  Alexander Moyzes
Conductor:  Ladislav Slovák
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
Number of Discs: 1 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

Alexander Moyzes was among the leading Slovak composers of his generation, drawing inspiration from the traditions and landscape of his own country while absorbing a number of wider contemporary trends. His Symphony No. 3, or Little Symphony is derived from an earlier Wind Quintet, while Symphony No. 4, with its occasional suggestions of Mahler and Sibelius, combines protest at the injustice of war with the past history of the Slovaks. The Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra was established in 1929 as the first professional symphony orchestra in Slovakia. The orchestra is currently led by conductor Mario Kosik. It has made a large number of recordings for labels including Opus, Supraphon, Naxos and Marco Polo. In addition to regular season Read more concerts, which feature works by Slovak composers, many of them as premieres, the orchestra has performed at concerts abroad, visiting Austria and Hungary, and touring in Europe, Japan, and Korea. Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Symphony no 3 in B flat major, Op. 17a by Alexander Moyzes
Conductor:  Ladislav Slovák
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
Written: 1942 
2.
Symphony no 4 in E flat major, Op. 38 by Alexander Moyzes
Conductor:  Ladislav Slovák
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra
Written: 1957 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 Subtly subversive May 15, 2019 By Ralph Graves (Hood, VA) See All My Reviews "Moyzes' Symphony No. 3 in B flat major is titled "The Little Symphony." It must be the work's origins -- at 23 minutes it seems plenty big to me. Moyzes used an early wind quintet as the foundation for the symphony. The five movements are short and concise. This 1942 work has some of the mordant wit of Prokofiev, especially in the scherzo. The liner notes state that the 1947 Symphony No. 4 in E major was "combines protest at the injustice of war with the past history of the Slovaks." Well, perhaps. The work's motifs were written first for a radio play about Herod and Heroditus. Some also came from a radio play about Slovak nationalist Ludovít Štúr. Whether that translates into a subversive protest or not, it didn't affect my enjoyment of the symphony. This is a dynamic work, almost restless in its motion and energy. Moyzes skillfully weaves the three movements together through thematic transformation. But this isn't "Finlandia." Moyzes' tonal symphony works quite well as an apolitical piece of abstract music." Report Abuse
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