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Prado: Complete Cartas Celestes, Vol. 4 / Scopel


Release Date: 04/13/2018 
Label:  Grand Piano   Catalog #: 747  
Composer:  Almeida Prado
Performer:  Aleyson Scopel
Number of Discs: 1 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

Jose Antonio Rezende de Almeida Prado referred to his vast set of 18 Cartas Celestes as an “incredible journey,” and the final three were completed just months before his death. Following the luminous Brazilian night skies of No. 13, the poetic references of the final trilogy refer to constellations named after animals, Grecian and Egyptian mythology, and one last homage to a pivotal figure in Brazilian literature. This is the final volume of Aleyson Scopel’s world premiere recording of the 15 Cartas Celestes for solo piano. Jose Antonio Rezende de Almeida Prado referred to his vast set of 18 Cartas Celestes as an “incredible journey,” and the final three were completed just months before his death. Following the luminous Brazilian night skies of No. 13, the poetic references of the final trilogy refer to constellations named after animals, Grecian and Egyptian mythology, and one last homage to a pivotal figure in Brazilian literature. This is the final volume of Aleyson Scopel’s world premiere recording of the 15 Cartas Celestes for solo piano. Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Cartas Celestes No. 13 by Almeida Prado
Performer:  Aleyson Scopel (Piano)
Period: Contemporary 
Written: Brazil 
2.
Cartas Celestes No. 16 "Magical Animals" by Almeida Prado
Performer:  Aleyson Scopel (Piano)
Period: Contemporary 
Written: Brazil 
3.
Cartas Celestes No. 17 "Celestial Egypt and Greece" by Almeida Prado
Performer:  Aleyson Scopel (Piano)
Period: Contemporary 
Written: Brazil 
4.
Cartas Celestes No. 18 "The Sky of Macunaíma" by Almeida Prado
Performer:  Aleyson Scopel (Piano)
Period: Contemporary 
Written: Brazil 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  2 Customer Reviews )
 Scopel completes his celestial journey April 29, 2018 By Art Music Lady See All My Reviews "Scopel understands this music very well, and indeed it takes a performer of imagination to play it with convincing authority. He ties every note and phrase together as if they were stitched into a tapestry, thus creating what can only be termed musical visions. Just as nothing was really random in Prado’s compositions, nothing is random in Scopel’s performances of them. He has undoubtedly practiced and played this music long enough to give each piece, and the separate movements within, their just due. It is truly a great achievement, and I wonder how audiences react to these pieces when he plays any of them in concert. The best way to listen, as I’ve said in reviewing the previous releases, is to just allow yourself to be caught up in the moment, to go with the flow, so to speak, and take each massive piece (they range in length, on this disc, from 11 to 22 minutes) in stride before moving on to the next one. --Lynn Rene Bayley, read my complete review at https://artmusiclounge.wordpress.com/2018/04/11/scopel-completes-his-celestial-journey/" Report Abuse
 A triumphal close to a magisterial piano series April 27, 2018 By Dean Frey See All My Reviews "The great Cartas Celestes series of the Brazilian composer Almeida Prado comes to a triumphant close with this fourth release by Aleyson Scopel. The series reminds me of the 15 Choros Villa-Lobos wrote between 1920 and 1929 (13 numbered works, an Introduction, and the Choros bis) in their combination of an avant garde musical language and folkloric influences, but most importantly in the intellectual and emotional scope of their vast canvases. Though nearly all of these works focus on the piano, the fact that three do not (#7 is for two pianos and symphonic band, #8 for violin and orchestra, and #11 for piano, marimba and vibraphone) makes one think of Villa's Choros series as well. It would be great if Naxos could record these three works to complete the series. But not to worry, Aleyson Scopel has everything well in hand on the piano side. If anything there is more virtuosity on display here, especially in #16-18, which Almeida Prado wrote in his last year, 2010. The whole series comes to a fitting end with a reference to Macunaíma, the elemental, larger than life character from Mario de Andrade's great modernist novel of 1928. And there are musical echoes of the elemental Villa-Lobos himself, especially Rudepoema and the two books of Prole do Bebe, along with the Choros series. Villa-Lobos famously said "This is my conservatory," pointing to a map of Brazil. To that map Almeida Prado has appended the great Celestial Map of the sky above Brazil, and Aleyson Scopel is the astronomer and astrologer who makes interprets this beautiful and awesome music." Report Abuse
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