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Bach: Violin Concertos / Zimmermann, Berliner Barock Solisten


Release Date: 01/19/2018 
Label:  Hänssler Classic   Catalog #: 17046  
Composer:  Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Serge ZimmermannFrank Peter Zimmermann
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin Baroque Soloists
Number of Discs: 1 
In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  


Notes and Editorial Reviews

Standard repertoire doesn’t get any more “standard” than Bach’s concertos for violin in A minor and E major–and every violinist from minor to major has recorded them. Which means that there are about a zillion versions available, many of them first rate. Well, here’s another to add to the list, excellent performances in fine sound–sturdy, stylish, reliable, lustrous, with lively tempos and some nifty, well-integrated ornaments–all the components needed to confirm this as a worthy staple of any library. And for good measure, the program includes two concertos not usually presented as violin works but in their later incarnations as keyboard concertos. Both are in D minor–BWV 1052 and BWV 1060, the latter for two solo instruments, for which Read more Zimmermann is joined here by his violinist son, Serge. It makes for an engaging program, something different from the usual pairing of the A minor and E major with the more familiar “Bach Double” (BWV 1043). Even after experiencing these works probably hundreds of times, hearing these performances is the musical equivalent to walking into a room and everything just feels right.

– ClassicsToday (David Vernier) Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Concerto for Violin no 1 in A minor, BWV 1041 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Serge Zimmermann (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin Baroque Soloists
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1717-1723; Cöthen, Germany 
2.
Concerto for Violin no 2 in E major, BWV 1042 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Serge Zimmermann (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin Baroque Soloists
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1717-1723; Cöthen, Germany 
3.
Concerto for Violin in D minor, BWV 1052 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Serge Zimmermann (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin Baroque Soloists
Period: Baroque 
Written: circa 1738-1739; Leipzig, Germany 
4.
Concerto for Oboe and Violin in C minor, BWV 1060 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Serge Zimmermann (Violin), Frank Peter Zimmermann (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Berlin Baroque Soloists
Period: Baroque 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  2 Customer Reviews )
 Very Satisying August 24, 2018 By Don E. (AUSTIN, TX) See All My Reviews "I've been listening to these concertos for fifty years and this is one of the best recordings I've ever heard of them. The Zimmermans' playing is lively and energetic, but not overly showy, letting the music speak for itself. Tempos are to my taste just right: vigorous and lively in the fast movements, and suitably soulful in the slow movements. The musicianship by soloists and orchestra is first rate throughout. If you love these concertos, don't miss this fine release." Report Abuse
 Come for the Zimmermann; Stay for the Berliner Ba August 11, 2018 By Joshua C. See All My Reviews "Given how popular the violin concertos of J.S.Bach are among classical music lovers and violinist alike, it’s remarkable how contested and uncertain some of their origins are! For those keeping score, there are only THREE violin concerti which have come down to us as indisputably written for the violin: A minor, BWV 1041, E major, BWV 1042 and the D minor Double Concerto BWV 1043. Others that have attained near canonical status include BWV 1052R in D Minor, and BWV 1056R in G minor, both conjectural reconstructions from harpsichord or organ originals, with BWV 1052 having the most tortured history. For generations, it was generally thought that Bach’s Violin Concertos were the product of his happy time as “Court Kapellmeister and Director of the Princely Chamber Musicians" at Anhalt-Cöthen, from 1717 to 1723, but recent research and extent manuscripts increasingly suggest that the works may have in fact been written much later (1729-36) as a result of Bach’s work with the Leipzig Collegium Musicum. The later dating makes a lot of sense when considering the stylistic advances over Vivaldi’s models – with which Bach was intimately familiar. Questions of origin and dating aside, I was particularly eager to hear what Frank Peter Zimmermann might make of these all-too-familiar masterworks! Following the release of his brilliant set of Mozart Concertos (also on hänssler CLASSIC), my expectations were pretty high and FPZ did not disappoint! Zimmermann is clearly an artist at the pinnacle of his artistry, and he approaches each of these works with a confident and easy virtuosity. Above all, he consistently shapes a beautiful line, exercising admirable restraint. His playing of the extended cadenza of the hotly contested BWV 1052R is a model of precision and control. In addition to Zimmermann’s artistry, there are several bonuses to these recordings that push them further into the “MUST HAVE” category. First, the hybrid historically informed Berliner Barock Solisten is a major discovery. More than just filling out the ritornellos, they provide some much delicious contrapuntal detail that on more than one occasion my attention shifted from Zimmermann to what they were doing. The second surprise was hearing Zimmermann’s son, Serge Zimmermann, joining his dad on a top-notch reading of the double concerto BWV 1060R (perhaps better known in its version for Violin and Oboe). Bach’s Violin Concertos certainly do not lack for representation in the catalogue, but to hear an artist of Zimmermann’s stature together with the masterful playing of the conductorless Berliner Barock Solisten make the possible duplication worth the while!" Report Abuse
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