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The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 73: Coke / Callaghan, Brabbins, BBC Scottish Symphony


Release Date: 10/27/2017 
Label:  Hyperion   Catalog #: 68173  
Composer:  Roger Sacheverell Coke
Performer:  Simon Callaghan
Conductor:  Martyn Brabbins
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra
Number of Discs: 1 
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Works on This Recording

1.
Concerto for Piano No. 3 in E-Flat Major, Op. 30 by Roger Sacheverell Coke
Performer:  Simon Callaghan (Piano)
Conductor:  Martyn Brabbins
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1938; England 
2.
Concerto for Piano No. 4 in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 38 by Roger Sacheverell Coke
Performer:  Simon Callaghan (Piano)
Conductor:  Martyn Brabbins
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1940; England 
3.
Concerto for Piano No. 5 in D Minor, Op. 57: II. Andante piacevole by Roger Sacheverell Coke
Performer:  Simon Callaghan (Piano)
Conductor:  Martyn Brabbins
Orchestra/Ensemble:  BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1947/1950; England 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  2 Customer Reviews )
 Gorgeous Music; A Great Discovery June 4, 2019 By Henry S. (Springfield, VA) See All My Reviews "I agree with Joshua C.'s comments, and I'll go one step further. If one were to explain the history of serious music by trying to shoehorn composers into rigid time-based categories of 'eras', then one might be tempted to question Hyperion's inclusion of Roger Coke's works in its wonderful Romantic Piano Concerto series. Coke was a 20th century British composer who lived into the 1970's, so what could be the justification for labelling him a romantic composer? The answer is quite simple- the pure beauty of his music. Volume 73 in the RPC series presents 3 of Coke's piano concertos, all of which have the lush, velvety smooth ambience of the same types of works dating from the late 19th century. This is especially true of Coke's 3rd Piano Concerto, which to me sounded like a concerto that Rachmaninoff could easily have written. Concerto #4 is somewhat in the same mold- broad, sweeping piano passages overlaid on a sophisticated and wholly appealing orchestral score. The 5th piano concerto, the final work on the disk, appears to be the sole surviving movement of a concerto that Coke either never completed, lost the rest, or suppressed the rest. Pianist Simon Callaghan teams up with conductor Martyn Brabbins and the outstanding BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra for a performance I'm sure you will really enjoy, especially with the superb sonic qualities provided by Hyperion's audio engineers. So hats off to Hyperion for producing this recording, even if Coke doesn't necessarily meet the 'academic' requirements as an 'authentic' Romantic Era diploma. If Rachmaninoff can be characterized as a late Romantic or Neo-Romantic composer, Roger Coke most certainly does as well. I do recommend this very fine recording, because if you do decide to do so, you are not likely to be disappointed. Definitely recommended." Report Abuse
 Grand Concertos in the Rachmaninoff/Scriabin Mode December 15, 2018 By Joshua C. See All My Reviews "For my money, Hyperion's Romantic Piano Concerto Series is pretty much self-recommending. I've been a devoted collector for years and only a handful have failed to impress. While there are many obscurities, most deep catalogue collectors (like myself) have at least some name recognition, but that was not the case with Roger Sacheverell Coke. In fact, were it not for the advocacy of pianist Simon Callaghan - and his recording these concerti - I still would not have heard of Coke. Coke is definitely one of those composers where you absolutely MUST forget about his birth and death dates (1912-1972) and just focus on the music - which is spectacularly wrought for both piano and orchestra in the Rachmaninoff/Scriabin tradition, especially Scriabin in the case of the Fourth Piano Concerto! Recommended!" Report Abuse
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