Arkiv Music Holiday Shop
WGBH Radio WGBH Radio theclassicalstation.org

Martinu: The Symphonies / Meister, Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra


Release Date: 10/06/2017 
Label:  Capriccio Records   Catalog #: 5320  
Composer:  Bohuslav Martinu
Conductor:  Cornelius Meister
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra
Number of Discs: 3 
In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  


Notes and Editorial Reviews

Martinu has suffered the fate of not enjoying the same popularity and wide appeal like Bedrich Smetana, Antonín Dvorák und Leoš Janácek on the podium. This often goes so far that his singular skill is referred to, but that the wealth of his oeuvre in all the salient genres is hardly familiar. For decades, Martinu had shied away from composing a symphony. The first one was finally to be written in the USA in 1942, followed by another one every year until 1946 (the sixth was only added to the work catalogue in 1953). For this reason, there is sometimes talk of the ‘American’ symphonies. The symphonies do mirror the events of the time, but at the same time long passages must be regarded as absolute music. Cornelius Meister Read more is regarded as one of the finest young conductors of our day and age, and here he fantastically interprets these six symphonies with transparency, emotion, and aplomb. Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Symphony no 1 by Bohuslav Martinu
Conductor:  Cornelius Meister
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1942; USA 
2.
Symphony no 2 by Bohuslav Martinu
Conductor:  Cornelius Meister
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1943; USA 
3.
Symphony no 3 by Bohuslav Martinu
Conductor:  Cornelius Meister
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1944; USA 
4.
Symphony no 4 by Bohuslav Martinu
Conductor:  Cornelius Meister
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1945; USA 
5.
Symphony no 5 by Bohuslav Martinu
Conductor:  Cornelius Meister
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1946; USA 
6.
Symphony no 6 "Fantaisies symphoniques" by Bohuslav Martinu
Conductor:  Cornelius Meister
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1951-1953; USA 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 A welcome new Martinu symphonies set October 19, 2017 By Dean Frey See All My Reviews "Back in 2011 Rob Barnett ended a review of the complete Martinu symphonies from Jiri Belohlávek and the BBC Symphony Orchestra with the following plea: The comparative avalanche of Martin? recordings unleashed two years ago around the fiftieth anniversary of the composer’s death has injected fresh life into this part of the catalogue. Too often however these birth/death splurges simply go to underscore longer term neglect – a huge exposure followed by a vertiginous fall back even deeper into obscurity. We must hope that Martin?’s star has a sustainable higher profile. This set shows that his music has all the necessary stamina and allure. It took a while, but the appearance of this complete set of six symphonies on three CDs, recorded live in Vienna from 2011 to 2017, serves to reinforce the essential importance of Martinu as a 20th century orchestral composer. It's a very fine recording as well, though it doesn't supplant the splended Onyx set of Belohlávek. It has a fine, clear, lifelike sound, with most of the advantages of live recording, a sense of occasion and excitement and a more organic and natural arc to the performance, without too many of the disadvantages. The audience is mainly well-behaved and the applause is edited out. The young German conductor Cornelius Meister impresses most in the more meditative music - I love his brooding ways in the Largo of the 3rd Symphony, and even more in the almost mystical 4th Symphony Largo. But the more rambunctious music - the 1st Symphony Scherzo is a good example - has nowhere near the rocket-ship propulsion of Belohlávek, nor the exuberance of the London musicians. Meister's Scherzo sounds more French than Czech, and it's hard to tell if that's because it's deliberately played in a more ironic, International Style way, or if the more rigorous and authentic Belohlávek brings out the raucous Bohemians in his BBC musicians. Perhaps it's a bit of both. What's clear is that this is serious, substantial music that replays multiple hearings with maximum concentration. I got a lot of pleasure from this set, and plan on keeping it in my regular rotation." Report Abuse
Review This Title