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Vecchi: Requiem / Schmelzer, Graindelavoix


Release Date: 03/24/2017 
Label:  Glossa   Catalog #: 32113  
Composer:  Orazio VecchiGeorge de la HèlePedro RuimonteDuarte Lôbo
Conductor:  Björn Schmelzer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Graindelavoix
Number of Discs: 1 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

For his latest Glossa release with Graindelavoix, Björn Schmelzer takes his lead from the funeral rites for the Flemish Baroque painter Peter Paul Rubens in 1640 – which might well have encompassed the Requiem Mass by Orazio Vecchi as recorded here – to demonstrate the coexistence in Baroque Antwerp of two apparently contradictory, but interconnected facets. One of these facets was the continuing presence of prima prattica polyphony; the city was a major centre for music printing and Vecchi’s Requiem was brought out there – as were works by other composers represented on this disc: George de La Hèle, Duarte Lobo and Pedro Ruimonte (the recording ends with three successive Agnus Deis!). The other facet is that of the image of Read more Rubens’s art: full of energy, seductive, optimistic and scintillating. The Northern Baroque par excellence. With his recording, Schmelzer encourages the listener to enter into this strange world of artistic clashes and ruptures – not least the fact that Vecchi, a composer better known for his secular music popular in Venice, would have had his stile antico sacred music performed in Antwerp. This is achieved with Graindelavoix’s customary uncompromising – and clearly provocative – vocal sound, complete with both artfully-executed ornamentations and attention to ensemble needs. Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Requiem by Orazio Vecchi
Conductor:  Björn Schmelzer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Graindelavoix
2.
Missa Praeter rerum seriem: Kyrie by George de la Hèle
Conductor:  Björn Schmelzer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Graindelavoix
3.
Missa Praeter rerum seriem: Sanctus by George de la Hèle
Conductor:  Björn Schmelzer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Graindelavoix
4.
Missa Praeter rerum seriem: Agnus Dei by George de la Hèle
Conductor:  Björn Schmelzer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Graindelavoix
5.
Missa Ave Virgo Sanctissima: Agnus Dei by Pedro Ruimonte
Conductor:  Björn Schmelzer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Graindelavoix
6.
Missa Dum aurora: Agnus Dei by Duarte Lôbo
Conductor:  Björn Schmelzer
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Graindelavoix

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 Slip, slidin' away April 28, 2017 By Dean Frey See All My Reviews "I've been immersed in the Glenn Gould world lately, reading Sandrine Revel's new graphic novel and watching 32 Short Films About Glenn Gould. The reason I mention this here is that Gould's 1955 recording of the Goldberg Variations was such a ground-breaking event, a revolution in performance practice. Looking back on some of the early responses to Gould's interpretation, his use of a piano in the repertoire, even the choice of music itself, some of it seems quite reactionary more than 60 years later. I dabble, at most, in music from the Renaissance and early Baroque, so I don't know too much about how this music should be sung. My first thought, though, was that the ornamentation, mordents (trills) and slides in abundance, threatens to swamp the music entirely. Trying to keep an open mind I was alternately swept away by the choir's gorgeous singing of unearthly beautiful music and irritated by the swoops and curlicues Bjorn Schmelzer has introduced into the music in apparent imitation of the sound of cornets and sackbuts of the Venetian composers of the time. Frank Sinatra famously imitated Tommy Dorsey's trombone style in developing his vocal technique. Similarly, Ella Fitzgerald once said "I stole everything I ever heard, but mostly I stole from the horns." This cross-fertilization is a sign of a vibrant musical culture, and the reluctance to fall in line with an exact precision of ensemble and a punctiliously straight-forward presentation is very much the same. The music should swing, but maybe not quite so much. Schmelzer places this music at Rubens' funeral in Antwerp in June of 1640, perhaps on some rather sketchy evidence. This is what got me interested in this album; I adore Rubens' paintings and admire him greatly as a artist and a person (I highly recommend Mark Lamster's book Master of Shadows, by the way, a fine portrait of a cosmopolitan man of letters and public affairs). Vecchi's Requiem was published in Antwerp in 1612, so at least we have the geography lined up. I guess it doesn't really matter too much in the end; we all have our own lineup of people to remember when we listen to Requiem masses, and the list gets longer for all of us every year. Come back to this review in 60 years to see if I've missed the boat here. What I mainly am right now is puzzled." Report Abuse
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