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Bach: Secular Cantatas, Vol. 6 - Trauerode / Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan


Release Date: 04/08/2016 
Label:  Bis   Catalog #: 2181  
Composer:  Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Joanne LunnRobin BlazeGerd TürkDominik Wörner,   ... 
Conductor:  Masaaki Suzuki
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Bach Collegium Japan
Number of Discs: 1 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

Bach’s secular cantatas, in contrast to his sacred works, were not always intended to be performed for a specific church service. They were frequently commissioned for weddings, funerals, or other occasions. This new release is the sixth volume of Bach’s secular cantatas, and includes Trauerode alongside others. This album is performed by the Bach Collegium Japan. Bach’s secular cantatas, in contrast to his sacred works, were not always intended to be performed for a specific church service. They were frequently commissioned for weddings, funerals, or other occasions. This new release is the sixth volume of Bach’s secular cantatas, and includes Trauerode alongside others. This album is performed by the Bach Collegium Japan. Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Lass, Fürstin, lass noch einen Strahl, BWV 198 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Joanne Lunn (Soprano), Robin Blaze (Countertenor), Gerd Türk (Tenor),
Dominik Wörner (Bass)
Conductor:  Masaaki Suzuki
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Bach Collegium Japan
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1727; Leipzig, Germany 
2.
Schlage doch, gewünschte Stunde, BWV 53 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Robin Blaze (Countertenor)
Conductor:  Masaaki Suzuki
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Bach Collegium Japan
Period: Baroque 
3.
Tilge, Höchster, meine Sünden, BWV 1083 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Carolyn Sampson (Soprano), Robin Blaze (Countertenor)
Conductor:  Masaaki Suzuki
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Bach Collegium Japan
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1741-1746; Leipzig, Germany 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  2 Customer Reviews )
 Incredible performance and recording of these thr November 3, 2016 By Warren Harris See All My Reviews "This recording consists of BWV 198, BWV 53, and BWV 1083 performed by the Bach Collegium Japan (chorus & orchestra) under the direction of Masaaki Suzuki, and this ensemble sounds *amazing* in every single movement, sprightly and energetic on their period instruments. I just adore the sound of the two Viola da gamba’s on this SACD recording. The first work on the disc is the 10 movement Cantata BWV 198, featuring Joanne Lunn (sop), Robin Blaze (alto), Gerd Turk (tenor), and Dominik Worner (bass). Ms. Lunn’s rich soprano is just right for this work in every section of the piece. Movements 1-4 are concerned with the sorrow of the people regarding the death of Christiane Eberhardine, and in the 2nd movement Ms. Lunn’s soprano is showcased and it is just pure. Movements 5 thru 7 are concerned with viewing her as a role model in death as she was in life, and the choral work in the 7th movement is just stunning. Movements 8 thru 10 bring closure to the work as they deal with the posthumous reputation of the deceased, with the 9th movement allowing Mr. Worner to show what he can do – and what he can do is most impressive. Next is the single movement work BWV 53, which is likely a work of Georg Melchior Hoffmann but was attributed to Bach because of an error at the publishing firm of Breitkopf in the 1760s. Regardless, the work is delightful and feature Robin Blaze’s amazing alto – it was worth the price of the disc for this piece alone. It is charming and captivating, and the use of the two bells gives it an extra special character. I love this piece and this particular interpretation of it. Glorious! The last work on this disc is BWV 1083, featuring Carolyn Sampson (sop) and Robin Blaze (alto). The piece itself is an arrangement of an original work by Giovanni Battista Pergolesi – Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater. This is a duet cantata, and Carolyn Sampson’s lovely soprano is paired with Robin Blaze’s loving alto, and the results are just wonderful. The 10th movement (track 21, Versus 10) is *amazing*. This listener had to listen to it twice it was so gorgeous. The 13th movement (track 24) is similarly attention getting, with Ms. Sampson’s voice jumping out of the speakers. Love her voice. The quality of this recording is simply spectacular, and the musicianship is of the highest order. I can tell that I need to acquire the other 54 volumes in this series (not a typo). The liner notes, while not extravagant, are extremely informative and particularly well written, providing insightful background on each work being performed. The libretto for each work also appears in both German and English in the back of the booklet. All in all, this is a top-notch recording, an amazing series of performances, and a thoroughly delightful recording that is of a quality that others should aspire to. Very highly recommended!" Report Abuse
 Is this in the right place? June 14, 2016 By Peter D. (Jersey City, NJ) See All My Reviews "No one can deny that Suzuki's Bach performances are simply the best available, especially in terms of complete surveys of the cantatas, not to mention every other choral work from his pen. But why should the volume presenting the Funeral Ode, Bach's adaptation of Pergolesi's Stabat Mater for Psalm 51 (the Miserere, one of the most solemn texts known to the church), and the tiny, spurious but irresistable Cantata 53 be included among the "secular cantatas"? The only other time I've heard Cantata 53, the bell was a deep-voiced bell that tolled. Here, it's a high-pitched bell that almost tinkles." Report Abuse
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