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Tartini: The Violin Concertos Vol 15 "so Che Pieta Non Hai" / Guglielmo, Lazari, Paladin, Et Al


Release Date: 11/25/2008 
Label:  Dynamic   Catalog #: 591/1-2   Spars Code: n/a 
Composer:  Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Federico GuglielmoGiovanni GuglielmoCarlo Lazari
Conductor:  Giovanni Guglielmo
Orchestra/Ensemble:  L'Arte dell'Arco
Number of Discs: 2 
Recorded in: Stereo 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews



TARTINI Violin Concertos: in B?, D 120 2,4; in D, D 27 2,3; in C, D 8 1,2; in G, D 82, “So che pietà non hai 2,3”; in C, D 10 2,4; in D, D 35 1,2; Read more class="ARIAL12b">in A, D 100 2,3; in E, D 52 1,2; 1 Giovanni Guglielmo (vn); 2 cond; 3 Carlo Lazari (vn); 4 Federico Guglielmo (vn); L’Arte dell’Arco (period instruments) DYNAMIC 591/1-2 (2 CDs: 93:30)


According to Danilo Prefumo’s notes, Dynamic’s 15th volume devoted to Giuseppe Tartini’s violin concertos includes eight works from his middle period (Prefumo bases his division of Tartini’s works into three groups on distinctions made by early Tartini scholar Minos Dounias, who catalogued Tartini’s more than 100 concertos and approximately 200 sonatas). The first period, from 1721 to 1735, includes works based on Vivaldi’s models. The second period (1735–50) brought freedom from Venetian models, enhanced virtuosity, and the establishment of the slow movements as the works’ core. The third period, from 1750, paid homage to the developing Classical style.


The 15th volume opens with the Concerto in B?, D 120, which, Prefumo notes, appeared in a number of manuscript copies. Federico Guglielmo strikes sparks in the virtuosic first movement and the ensemble sounds piquantly rhythmic even at the stately tempo they’ve adopted. He sings the ornamented Andante unaffectedly over a simple accompaniment in repeated notes studded with poignant harmonies. His solid double-stops provide violinistic interest in the somewhat foursquare finale. Carlo Lazari plays the Concerto in D Major, D 27, a work employing in its first movement’s thematic sections melodic figures recognizable from the sonatas and concertos as Tartini’s own. His swirling lightweight figuration, studded with double-stops, suggests that Tartini must have possessed a technique capable not only of awkward stretches (as in his “Devil’s Trill”) but also of fluent facility as well, even in the highest registers. As did Federico Guglielmo in the collection’s first concerto, Lazari plays with a rhythmic springiness that listeners to Tartini’s works in their early 20th-century reincarnations would hardly have associated with the composer, let alone the violinist. Lazari plays the Andante touchingly over a pizzicato accompaniment. The Concerto in C Major, D 8, opens with an imposing tutti; sweeter-toned Giovanni Guglielmo, the third soloist—and the group’s concertmaster—enters in a solo that sounds more melodic than virtuosic. Although movement generally preserves the usual distinction between tutti and solo sections, the ensemble on at least one occasion plays in a relationship with the soloist that prefigures what would become later in the next century a closer and more equal partnership. Guglielmo reveals a deep-lying mournful vein in the Largo. He dispatches the last movement’s figuration with a brilliance similar to that of the other soloists. It’s clear that the difference between this work and the others lies less in its reading than in the text itself; these concertos aren’t all cut from the same cloth (Stravinsky would have had a more difficult time describing Tartini as having composed the same concerto over and over). The slow movement of the Concerto in G Major, D 82, bears a superscript ( So che pietà non hai )—Tartini would write these over the score. Carlo Lazari brings to the lightly accompanied first movement a poignancy that belies its usually cheerful key and passagework. Lazari maintains that atmosphere through the slow movement, overlaying it with delicate sensitivity. The last movement introduces showy passagework similar to that in the works of Jean-Marie Leclair and even Pietro Locatelli.


The second CD also contains four concertos, the first of which, in C Major, D 10, with Federico Guglielmo as soloist, begins with a starchy tutti. The thematic material of the final Allegro sounds, at times, forward-looking—as does that of the Concerto in D Major, D 35. Giovanni Guglielmo plays in a manner that almost suggests improvisation in the first two movements of that concerto, and he drives the finale forward with irresistible élan. Carlo Lazari serves as the soloist in the Concerto in A Major, D 100, one of the most extroverted works on the program. The slow movement features snippets of true dialogue with the continuo and piercingly sequential passages. Lazari sounds particularly virtuosic in the finale, which he caps off with a cadenza (since Nicola Reniero mentions that some of the cadenzas in the large set come from the violinists themselves, it’s not clear if Tartini supplied this one). Giovanni Guglielmo serves as soloist in the last concerto in the set, in E Major, D 52. The first movement, with its chunky tutti and bracing solos, introduces as well the lyrical suavity about which Tartini seemed to be concerned theoretically in his writings as well as practically in his compositions. Guglielmo plays with incontrovertible authority, as he does in the slow movement (the notes relate that it’s in B Major—a stretch perhaps in unequal temperament, and a possible opportunity, as here, for the harpsichord to sit out). Guglielmo is expressive and pure in the finale’s passages in upper registers and in working out the movement’s attractive melodic ideas.


L’Arte dell’Arco plays these concertos at what continuo player Nicola Reniero describes as Venetian pitch (in this case, A = 442) and in Vallotti temperament. The recorded sound reveals a great deal of melodic detail in the ensemble but captures the soloists close up in the Church of Santa Maria Annunziata. Reniero also describes, in the booklet, the necessity of supplying missing parts throughout the larger collection of concertos, as well as the ensemble’s aesthetic preference for differing tempos in the solos and tuttis (remember the performances on modern instruments by Claudio Scimone and I Solisti Veneti?). Dynamic deserves a warm expression of thanks for persisting in this extended endeavor, resurrecting the works of one of the most important violinists and pedagogues of all time. And these aren’t just archival performances, but ones to be enjoyed repeatedly. Those who have embraced the earlier volumes of the series will find in this one the same kind of exuberant virtuosity, thoughtful and sensitive musicianship, and stylistic geniality in concertos that must number among the most appealing Tartini wrote. Strongly recommended.


FANFARE: Robert Maxham
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Works on This Recording

1.
Concerto for Violin in B flat major, D 120 by Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Federico Guglielmo (Violin), Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin), Carlo Lazari (Violin)
Conductor:  Giovanni Guglielmo
Orchestra/Ensemble:  L'Arte dell'Arco
Period: Baroque 
2.
Concerto for Violin in D major, D 27 by Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin), Carlo Lazari (Violin), Federico Guglielmo (Violin)
Conductor:  Giovanni Guglielmo
Orchestra/Ensemble:  L'Arte dell'Arco
Period: Baroque 
3.
Concerto for Violin in C major, D 89 by Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin), Carlo Lazari (Violin), Federico Guglielmo (Violin)
Conductor:  Giovanni Guglielmo
Orchestra/Ensemble:  L'Arte dell'Arco
Period: Baroque 
4.
Concerto for Violin in G major, D 82 by Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin), Carlo Lazari (Violin), Federico Guglielmo (Violin)
Conductor:  Giovanni Guglielmo
Orchestra/Ensemble:  L'Arte dell'Arco
Period: Baroque 
5.
Concerto for Violin in D major, D 10 by Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin), Carlo Lazari (Violin), Federico Guglielmo (Violin)
Conductor:  Giovanni Guglielmo
Orchestra/Ensemble:  L'Arte dell'Arco
Period: Baroque 
6.
Concerto for Violin in D major, D 35 by Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin), Carlo Lazari (Violin), Federico Guglielmo (Violin)
Conductor:  Giovanni Guglielmo
Orchestra/Ensemble:  L'Arte dell'Arco
Period: Baroque 
7.
Concerto for Violin in A major, D 100 by Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin), Carlo Lazari (Violin), Federico Guglielmo (Violin)
Conductor:  Giovanni Guglielmo
Orchestra/Ensemble:  L'Arte dell'Arco
Period: Baroque 
8.
Concerto for Violin in E major, D 52 by Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Federico Guglielmo (Violin), Carlo Lazari (Violin), Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin)
Conductor:  Giovanni Guglielmo
Orchestra/Ensemble:  L'Arte dell'Arco
Period: Baroque 

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