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Bernstein Century - Mahler: Symphony No 9


Release Date: 09/29/1998 
Label:  Sony   Catalog #: 60597   Spars Code: ADD 
Composer:  Gustav Mahler
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
Length: 1 Hours 20 Mins. 

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Notes and Editorial Reviews

REVIEWS:
New York Times (Publisher) (7/30/00, p.30) - "...An aching and apocalyptic version of this signature vehicle for Bernstein; the recording remains a touchstone..."
REVIEWS:
New York Times (Publisher) (7/30/00, p.30) - "...An aching and apocalyptic version of this signature vehicle for Bernstein; the recording remains a touchstone..." Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Symphony no 9 in D major by Gustav Mahler
Conductor:  Leonard Bernstein
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New York Philharmonic
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1908-1909; Austria 
Date of Recording: 12/16/1965 
Venue:  Avery Fisher Hall, Lincoln Center, NYC 
Length: 79 Minutes 51 Secs. 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 It Doesn't Get Any Better Than This! August 7, 2015 By Richard Buckley (Oakmont, PA) See All My Reviews "I love the music of Mahler. It always is very emotional. This recording of his Ninth Symphony is certainly no exception. I'm sure you gathered that much from the comments of others. Also, Leonard Bernstein is no slouch when it comes to expressing emotion musically. In fact, he might be the best 20th century conductor when it comes to that skill. He is certainly my favorite, or close to it. I put him in the same class as Fritz Reiner, who also had that knack. Anyway, the combination of Mahler and Bernstein is always outstanding! They might have been made for each other, and this specific symphony brings out the best in them! It is a soul wrenching piece of music. The first and last movements are almost painful in their description of tragedy - namely death. As I said, Bernstein is born to conduct these two movements. He is often accused, especially in his later years, of conducting music much too slowly. I disagree. He conducted passionately, and if the score suggested tragedy and death, he responded accordingly. Obviously, Mahler meant for his composition to reflect these circumstances, and Bernstein portrays these emotions better than any other conductor I have heard. On the other hand, the two middle movements are quite different. While they are also very emotional, and disastrous in tonal intensity, They are anything but slow in nature! They fiercely explode in places, and, once again, Bernstein almost reads Mahler's mind with his intense interpretation. Mahler would have loved it - even more than I do! I think that the New York Philharmonic does an outstanding job with this symphony. I have heard Bernstein conducting the Berlin Symphony Orchestra, but not enough times to do a serious comparison of the two recordings. I recall thinking at the time, that the recording was also excellent, but too much time had passed since I heard this version, that it would be foolish to try to compare them now. Suffice it to say, that I strongly believe that you will be extremely pleased by this Mahler/Bernstein offering." Report Abuse
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