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Lidarti: Violin Concertos / D'orazio, Auser Musici

Lidarti / Auser Musici / Ipata
Release Date: 06/10/2008 
Label:  Hyperion   Catalog #: 67685  
Composer:  Christian Joseph Lidarti
Performer:  Francesco D'Orazio
Conductor:  Francesco D'Orazio
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Auser Musici
Number of Discs: 1 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews



LIDARTI Violin Concertos: in d; in A; in C. String Quartet in G Francesco d’Orazio (vn, cond); Auser Musici (period instruments) HYPERION 67685 (61:25)


According to Dinko Fabris’s notes, the three violin concertos of Christian Joseph Lidarti, a contemporary of Giuseppe Tartini’s violin student, the composer Pietro Nardini, appear in only one source: the Paganini Conservatoire in Genoa. Fabris arranges them in an order different from their numbered sequence, suggesting that the Concerto No. 3 in A Major, Read more which only strings accompany, may have come from an earlier period than did the Concerto No. 2 in D Minor, which weaves winds into its orchestral texture, and the Concerto No. 1 in C Major, which he considers the most advanced of the three. Francesco d’Orazio’s program opens with the D-Minor Concerto, the first movement of which sets the solo violin against a chunkily Haydnesque orchestral accompaniment. Although Fabris refers to “relentless virtuoso difficulties,” the solo part seems modest, restricted to explorations of the instrument’s higher registers and bright triplet figuration—at least until the cadenza, replete with swirling arpeggiations. D’Orazio draws a somewhat astringent tone from his 1711 Giuseppe Guarneri (del Gesù?), a timbre that complements the ensemble’s acidulous woodwind accompaniment. The Concerto’s slender second movement gives way to a raucous finale that hardly exceeds the technical requirements of the first movement, devoting itself to working out its materials by means of a very similar figural vocabulary. The A-Major Concerto opens forcefully with three staccato hammer strokes and proceeds with melodic material and developmental passagework that draw more heavily on chords and double-stopping, set in a musical framework that seems to resemble Haydn more strongly than, say, Nardini (Fabris mentions nevertheless that Lidarti’s autobiography, submitted to Giovanni Battista Martini, didn’t mention any direct connection with that composer, although the orchestral statement of the finale’s theme generates excitement in a manner similar to that of the first movement of Haydn’s “Farewell” Symphony). The Concerto in C Major begins with a movement almost twice as long as the corresponding numbers of either of the other concertos, allowing an extended working out of its more prepossessing musical materials—more leisurely but, perhaps, with greater ingenuity, both musical and technical as well (for example, a dramatic interlude featuring flurries of virtuosic passagework interrupts the movement). After a more brooding, introspective second movement, the finale returns to the high spirits of the first. The Quartet, which, according to Fabris, Venier had published in Paris in an orchestral version, provides an elegant, ingratiating diversion from the concertos, which, despite their differences, share perhaps too many family resemblances to allow rapt listening seriatim.


D’Orazio plays the solos archly (he doesn’t participate in the Quartet), pointing phrases with spitting articulation that’s almost punk in its cocky freshness; he makes an equally appropriate virtuosic impression in the cadenzas, though they may not equal in difficulty even Locatelli’s celebrated Capriccios from L’arte del violino . The engineers have revealed a great deal of detail—and a nearly equal amount of color—in the performances of both ensemble and soloist. Recommended, for the vigorous, forthright performances, although the works may appeal most strongly to students of the period and of the emerging classical violin concerto.

FANFARE: Robert Maxham


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Works on This Recording

1. Concerto for Violin no 1 in C major by Christian Joseph Lidarti
Performer:  Francesco D'Orazio (Violin)
Conductor:  Francesco D'Orazio
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Auser Musici
Period: Classical 
2. Concerto for Violin no 2 in D minor by Christian Joseph Lidarti
Performer:  Francesco D'Orazio (Violin)
Conductor:  Francesco D'Orazio
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Auser Musici
Period: Classical 
3. Concerto for Violin no 3 in A major by Christian Joseph Lidarti
Performer:  Francesco D'Orazio (Violin)
Conductor:  Francesco D'Orazio
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Auser Musici
Period: Classical 
4. Quartet for Strings in G major by Christian Joseph Lidarti
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Auser Musici
Period: Classical 

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