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Sorprendente Suonator Di Violino - Meneghetti: Concertos & Sonatas


Release Date: 04/08/2008 
Label:  Tactus   Catalog #: 731301   Spars Code: n/a 
Composer:  Giovanni Meneghetti
Performer:  Giovanni GuglielmoEnrico Zanovello
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Archicembalo Ensemble
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews



MENEGHETTI Violin Concertos: in A; in F; in C; in F; in D. Violin Sonata in A. Harpsichord Sonatas: in B?; in g Giovanni Guglielmo (vn); Archicembalo (period instruments) TACET 731301 (64:43)


Francesco Passadore’s notes suggest that explorers of general research works will find little if anything about Giovanni Meneghetti (1730–1794), a violinist, organist, and conductor born in Vicenza, where he spent his productive life, though “various foreign courts vied for his services.” Passadore and Archicembalo Read more have discovered biographical references to him, therefore, in local publications and have assembled a portrait of him as composer, including five of six violin concertos (the sixth, according to Passadore, lacked viola and bass parts in the Fondo Malaspina of the Archivio di Stato in Verona and could, therefore, not be easily reconstructed).


The violin concertos may represent a technical step beyond those of Giuseppe Tartini, which they resemble in their melodic contours, but, as Passadore’s notes point out, they employ, in the solo sections, a sort of “concerto grosso” texture in which two violins accompany the soloist. Meneghetti provided sparkling figuration, a bit brighter and perhaps less mannered than Tartini’s, and cadenzas in the outer movements, though movements suddenly cloud over with minor melancholy, as in the first one of the program’s first Concerto in F Major. But the slow movements of these three-movement works sing, over throbbing accompaniments, in a cantabile that extends, at least in Guglielmo’s sweetly intimate readings (supported by Enrico Zanovello’s imaginative and sensitive continuo), Tartini’s range of expression, despite what Passadore notes as their reduced forces. As did so many of the Italians who preceded him (archetypically, Corelli and Vivaldi), Meneghetti relies on sequences to spin out his melodic materials; but in his works, those sequences have a bittersweet quality far removed expressively from those of his forerunners. Passadore reveals that the Adagio in E Minor actually represents a transposition of the Grave from Tartini’s Concerto in A Major, D 103; and its nearly perfect stylistic fit confirms the impression of an underlying relationship between Meneghetti’s style and that of his almost 40-year-older contemporary.


The brief Sonata in A Major (from the Bergamo Library) makes less imposing demands on the violinist but hardly lacks melodic charm in comparison with its more texturally developed discmates. The two harpsichord sonatas, like Scarlatti’s, stand complete in one movement each. The first sonata, an Allegro in B? Major, foreshadows the melodic material of Rachmaninoff’s famous 18th of the Variations on a Theme by Paganini ; the second, a Largo in G Minor, provides a reflective foil.


Giovanni Guglielmo, noted as a violin soloist on both modern instruments and period ones, produces a rounded tone from his 1712 Bernardus Calcanius violin; it’s nuanced, too, and capable of a wide range of sensibility, as in the first movement of the program’s second Concerto in F Major. The ensemble never sounds either strident or crunchy, though its timbres seem deeply influenced by the native sonorities of the instruments on which they play—and they impart to the fast movements a jaunty rhythmic bounce. The engineers have placed Guglielmo rather far forward, though he blends well with the accompanying violins in the concertos’ solos. With music as ingratiating as this remaining unexplored, a great many very pleasant surprises must surely be in store for violinists and collectors of Italian Baroque concertos and sonatas. Very strongly recommended as the kind of fresh air so many of us continuously strain to breathe.

FANFARE: Robert Maxham


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Works on This Recording

1.
Sonata for Violin in A major by Giovanni Meneghetti
Performer:  Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Archicembalo Ensemble
Period: Classical 
Written: Italy 
Length: 1 Minutes 55 Secs. 
2.
Concerto for Violin in D major by Giovanni Meneghetti
Performer:  Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Archicembalo Ensemble
Period: Classical 
Written: Italy 
Length: 4 Minutes 41 Secs. 
3.
Concerto for Violin in F major [Adagio without bass] by Giovanni Meneghetti
Performer:  Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Archicembalo Ensemble
Period: Classical 
Written: Italy 
Length: 3 Minutes 51 Secs. 
4.
Sonata for Harpsichord in B flat major by Giovanni Meneghetti
Performer:  Enrico Zanovello (Harpsichord)
Period: Classical 
Written: Italy 
Length: 2 Minutes 12 Secs. 
5.
Sonata for Harpsichord in G minor by Giovanni Meneghetti
Performer:  Enrico Zanovello (Harpsichord)
Period: Classical 
Written: Italy 
Length: 3 Minutes 59 Secs. 
6.
Concerto fo Violin in G major: 1st movement, Allegro by Giovanni Meneghetti
Performer:  Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Archicembalo Ensemble
Period: Classical 
Length: 4 Minutes 53 Secs. 
7.
Concerto fo Violin in G major: 2nd movement, Adagio by Giovanni Meneghetti
Performer:  Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Archicembalo Ensemble
Period: Classical 
Length: 2 Minutes 3 Secs. 
8.
Concerto fo Violin in G majo: 3rd movement, Allegro by Giovanni Meneghetti
Performer:  Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Archicembalo Ensemble
Period: Classical 
Length: 3 Minutes 3 Secs. 
9.
Concerto for Violin in F major by Giovanni Meneghetti
Performer:  Giovanni Guglielmo (Violin)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Archicembalo Ensemble
Period: Classical 
Written: Italy 
Length: 4 Minutes 17 Secs. 

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