Holiday Shop


WGBH Radio WGBH Radio theclassicalstation.org

Der Romantische Sinfoniker Vol 2 - Bruch / Wolters, Et Al


Release Date: 09/25/2007 
Label:  Ebs   Catalog #: 6142   Spars Code: n/a 
Composer:  Max Bruch
Performer:  Ursula Schoch
Conductor:  Theo Wolters
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New Philharmonie Westphalia
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Multi 
This title is currently unavailable.



Notes and Editorial Reviews

This is a hybrid Super Audio CD playable on both regular and Super Audio CD players.

3140760.az_BRUCH_Serenade_Violin_Orchestra.html

BRUCH Serenade for Violin and Orchestra in a. Romance for Violin and Orchestra in a. Suite on Russian Folk Melodies Theo Wolters, cond; Ursula Schoch (vn); New Philharmonie Westphalia EBS 6142 (Hybrid multichannel SACD: 64:04)


Max Bruch (1838–1920) Read more is not alone in having had the misfortune to be thought of as a one-work composer. Can anyone honestly name Bruch without his G-Minor Violin Concerto coming to mind? The sad part of it is that Bruch was really a highly gifted and well-rounded musician. His catalog of works includes three magnificent symphonies, some gorgeous chamber music, an opera, oratorios, a large volume of songs and choral pieces, and a number of other concertos, and not just for violin.


In this release, labeled Volume II of “The Romantic Symphony,” we hear two of Bruch’s concerted works for violin and orchestra, the Serenade, op. 75, and the Romance, op. 42; and the Suite on Russian Folk Melodies for large orchestra, op. 79b. Written in 1900 at the behest of Sarasate, who later declined to play it, the Serenade was premiered by Joseph Joachim. It’s a long work—over 35 minutes—whose four movements echo in style of writing and formal design the composer’s Scottish Fantasy of 20 years earlier. In all but name both works (the Fantasy and the Serenade) are violin concertos.


Bruch came to be associated with the Schumann-Brahms-Joachim circle as a musical conservative and resistor against the “futurists” who, in Bruch’s view included anyone who deviated from the mainstream German Romantic tradition. Bruch branded Richard Strauss and Hugo Wolf as members of “the great artistic pigsty,” and Debussy “sickened” him. By 1900, works like the Serenade were hopelessly out of date, a throwback not to Brahms, but even earlier to Mendelssohn and Schumann. Yet the appeal of Bruch’s music lies in its inspired melodic invention, its richly scored harmonies, and in the sure hand of a master orchestrator at work.


The success of the G-Minor Violin Concerto behind him, Bruch began work in 1873 on what was to be a new violin concerto. But after completing the first movement, his enthusiasm for the project waned, and he decided to publish the movement as a stand-alone piece. It was the Romance for Violin and Orchestra, a 10-minute Andante sostenuto that in certain ways anticipates the first movement of the composer’s Second Violin Concerto in D Minor.


The latest of Bruch’s works on this disc is the Suite on Russian Folk Melodies , originally published in 1903 as a collection of nine Russian and Swedish dances for violin and piano, which received the opus number 79. Both the composer and his publisher were keenly aware of the widespread success of Brahms’s Hungarian Dances in various arrangements, so in that same year, Bruch orchestrated four of the numbers and published them as 79b. As with the Serenade, which in its layout of movements and formal structure takes on the shape of a concerto, the Suite, in its four movements and orchestration for a large ensemble, resembles a symphony.


Competition in the two violin works comes mainly from Salvatore Accardo’s twofer Philips set of Bruch’s complete works for violin and orchestra. If you already have this set and you are partial to Accardo’s playing, which I am not, the present entry will probably be redundant, especially since these are not among the composer’s most memorable works. As for the Suite , there is an earlier performance of it recorded in 1984 on this same label with the Rhenish Philharmonic, and a slightly later (1987) recording on Naxos. Both are perfectly satisfactory, but the new entry has the clear advantage in terms of its SACD format and sonic opulence.


FANFARE: Jerry Dubins
Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Serenade for Violin and Orchestra in A minor, Op. 75 by Max Bruch
Performer:  Ursula Schoch (Violin)
Conductor:  Theo Wolters
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New Philharmonie Westphalia
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1900; Germany 
2.
Romance for Violin and Orchestra in A minor, Op. 42 by Max Bruch
Performer:  Ursula Schoch (Violin)
Conductor:  Theo Wolters
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New Philharmonie Westphalia
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1874; Berlin, Germany 
3.
Suite on Russian folk melodies, Op. 79b by Max Bruch
Performer:  Ursula Schoch (Violin)
Conductor:  Theo Wolters
Orchestra/Ensemble:  New Philharmonie Westphalia
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1905; Berlin, Germany 

Customer Reviews

Be the first to review this title
Review This Title
Review This Title Share on Facebook




YOU MUST BE A SUBSCRIBER TO LISTEN TO ARKIVMUSIC STREAMING.
TRY IT NOW FOR FREE!
Sign up now for two weeks of free access to the world's best classical music collection. Keep listening for only $19.95/month - thousands of classical albums for the price of one! Learn more about ArkivMusic Streaming
Aleady a subscriber? Sign In