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David Crumb: Red Desert

Crumb / Gearhart,Fritz / Hamm,Corey
Release Date: 03/03/2015 
Label:  Bridge   Catalog #: 9450  
Composer:  David Crumb
Performer:  Fritz GearhartCorey HammJerome SimasSteve Vacchi,   ... 
Conductor:  Robert Ponto

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Notes and Editorial Reviews

David Crumb was born into a musical family. His father is renowned composer George Crumb, and his sister, Ann Crumb, is a highly regarded singer and actress. Crumb studied composition Samuel Adler, Jay Reise, Richard Wernick, Stephen Jaffe, and Chinary Ung, receiving a fellowship from the Tanglewood Music Institute where he attended master classes by Lukas Foss and Oliver Knussen. Shortly thereafter, he traveled to Jerusalem, to study composition and counterpoint with Mark Kopytman. David Crumb joined the music faculty at the University of Oregon in 1997, where he continues to serve as an Associate Professor of Composition and Theory. This CD presents four of Crumb's compositions spanning the past two decades. David Crumb was born into a musical family. His father is renowned composer George Crumb, and his sister, Ann Crumb, is a highly regarded singer and actress. Crumb studied composition Samuel Adler, Jay Reise, Richard Wernick, Stephen Jaffe, and Chinary Ung, receiving a fellowship from the Tanglewood Music Institute where he attended master classes by Lukas Foss and Oliver Knussen. Shortly thereafter, he traveled to Jerusalem, to study composition and counterpoint with Mark Kopytman. David Crumb joined the music faculty at the University of Oregon in 1997, where he continues to serve as an Associate Professor of Composition and Theory. This CD presents four of Crumb's compositions spanning the past two decades. Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
September Elegy by David Crumb
Performer:  Fritz Gearhart (Violin), Corey Hamm (Piano)
Written: 2001 
2.
Soundings by David Crumb
Performer:  Jerome Simas (Clarinet), Corey Hamm (Piano), Steve Vacchi (Bassoon)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1994 
3.
Red Desert Triptych by David Crumb
Performer:  Marcantonio Barone (Piano)
Written: 2006-2012 
4.
Primordial Fantasy by David Crumb
Performer:  Marcantonio Barone (Piano)
Conductor:  Robert Ponto
Written: 2002 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 Intiutive, engaging music July 30, 2015 By Ralph Graves (Hood, VA) See All My Reviews ""Red Desert" presents four world-premiere recordings by David Crumb. Crumb is a self-professed intuitive composer, letting the music take him where it will. It gives his work a spontaneity that's quite attractive. To my ears, Crumb's style seems post-tonal. That is, he's not afraid of using triads and consonant harmonies, but he's also not bound to use them traditionally. "September Elegy" is an evocative work for violin and piano. Commissioned in 2001 by violinist Fritz Gearhart (who performs it here), Crumb incorporated his reaction 9/11, giving the work a powerful emotional center, with wide-open intervals and poignant half-step turns in the melody. In "Soundings," for clarinet bassoon and piano, Crumb (according to the liner notes) wanted to write idiomatically for the clarinet and bassoon. He succeeded. Each instrument has its own character, with the music thoroughly integrated into the technical demands of the instrument. Occasionally I was reminded of Stravinsky though -- especially when the bassoon was playing in its highest register. The most substantial work on the album is "Red Desert Tryptych." Crumb calls it a symphony for solo piano, inspired by visits to southwestern parks. Its aptly titled. The music has a big, open sound to it. There are plenty of thick, shimmering chords and cascading runs -- but its all for a purpose. Crumb captures the essence of the grandeur of big sky country. Marcantonio Barone (who premiered the work) performs Red Desert with élan, and a technique that makes the big gestures sound big, but not overblown.The final work on the album, "Primordial Fantasy" is an interesting one for solo piano and chamber ensemble. And it's the least tonal composition of the four. One instrument after another rises out of the swirling primordial ooze of sound as its melody takes form. Then it sinks back, replaced by another." Report Abuse
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