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Bach: Solo Sonatas & Partitas / Gil Shaham

Bach,J.s. / Shaham,Gil
Release Date: 03/10/2015 
Label:  Canary Classics   Catalog #: 14  
Composer:  Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gil Shaham
Number of Discs: 2 
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CD:  $26.99
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

Once a rare recording milestone, Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin — some of the most profound music ever written — are now virtually ubiquitous. Gil Shaham, though, waited until his sea- soned mid-forties, taking the time to dig deep. He changed his instrumental setup — having his 1699 Stradivarius outfitted with gut strings and a Baroque bridge, along with using a Baroque bow — and that gives him a sound that’s both grittier and more lithe. His interpretations are powerful and personal, with an improvisational edge that highlights the music’s boldness. Since his Deutsche Grammophon days, Shaham has been releasing thoughtfully produced discs on his own label, and this two-CD set includes notes that extensively quote the violinist Read more on his Bach process.

– Bradley Bambarger, Listen Magazine Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Sonata for Violin solo no 3 in C major, BWV 1005 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gil Shaham (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
2.
Sonata for Violin solo no 2 in A minor, BWV 1003 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gil Shaham (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
3.
Sonata for Violin solo no 1 in G minor, BWV 1001 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gil Shaham (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
4.
Partita for Violin solo no 3 in E major, BWV 1006 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gil Shaham (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
5.
Partita for Violin solo no 2 in D minor, BWV 1004 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gil Shaham (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
6.
Partita for Violin solo no 1 in B minor, BWV 1002 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gil Shaham (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  2 Customer Reviews )
 Fascinating and delightful interpretations of the August 3, 2015 By Warren Harris See All My Reviews "I have to admit right form the start that I’m a Gil Shaham fan, and have always enjoyed his playing and craftsmanship. And in this project, Mr. Shaham decided to reconfigure his Stradivarius into a more Baroque configuration, utilizing a Baroque bridge, bow, and wound-gut strings (not sheep), and the effect it had on Mr. Shaham’s playing is detailed in the very well written liner notes. But you can hear the difference in lightness, feeling, and soft initial attack. It is interesting that Mr. Shaham really enjoyed playing with the Baroque bow – I hope he continues to do so, as the result is wonderful. He also immersed himself in research about the various pieces, and discusses tempos, interpretations, and his thoughts on the appropriate speed of certain dance movements. It is clear that he dove right into learning as much as he could about both this music and certain things that he took for granted as a performer, and the result is both emotionally and intellectually stimulating for the listener as well. So how is the music? Unbelievable. And whole. And fulfilling. This recording is warm and delicate and technically delightful. I found myself captivated when I was listening to it, and it has spent more than a few hours in my CD player both at home and in the car. It was hard for me to do anything else while it was playing. Yes, it’s that good. Very highly recommended!" Report Abuse
 Completely convincing Bach May 2, 2015 By Dean Frey See All My Reviews "The great violinist Gil Shaham was in no hurry to record the great Bach works for solo violin, and he only began to play some of the works in public about ten years ago. Then, in preparation for this major project, he tore down some of the key components of violin technique to the basics. Furthermore, he took up a Baroque-style bow and bridge and began playing with wound-gut strings, using less vibrato and faster tempi in some movements. As Shaham explains to Ariane Todes in the illuminating long essay included in this 2 CD set, the primary goal behind these changes was musical rather than musicological. All of this was in aid of a lighter, transparent, nimble sound, with more subtle effects. I find the results completely convincing, and this set will join those of Rachel Podger, Christian Tetzlaff and Alina Ibragimova, other recent outstanding versions, in a regular rotation of listening. This awesome music is in turn clever, joyful, and deeply moving, and as good as this recording is, a single violinist’s version will never be sufficient." Report Abuse
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