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Comedie et Tragedie - Lully, Marais, Rebel / Tempesta di Mare

Lully / Tempesta Di Mare / Philadelphia Baroque
Release Date: 02/24/2015 
Label:  Chandos   Catalog #: 805   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Jean-Baptiste LullyJean-Féry RebelMarin Marais
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Tempesta di Mare
Number of Discs: 1 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

This is Volume 1 of Tempesta di Mare’s two-disc project of late seventeenth century French instrumental music. Suites of music were often compiled from stage works that were performed at the time and presented in the form of instrumental excerpts and dances. These suites contain some of the most tuneful, appealing and striking music of the period with works by Lully, Marais and Rebel.

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The group seem genuinely at home in the 18-th century music ... The tempos are well chosen – dignified in the overtures and marches, lilting and swaggering in the airs and dances – and command of dynamics and ornamentation are superb throughout.

– Gramophone [April 2015]
This is Volume 1 of Tempesta di Mare’s two-disc project of late seventeenth century French instrumental music. Suites of music were often compiled from stage works that were performed at the time and presented in the form of instrumental excerpts and dances. These suites contain some of the most tuneful, appealing and striking music of the period with works by Lully, Marais and Rebel.

-----

The group seem genuinely at home in the 18-th century music ... The tempos are well chosen – dignified in the overtures and marches, lilting and swaggering in the airs and dances – and command of dynamics and ornamentation are superb throughout.

– Gramophone [April 2015] Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Le bourgeois gentilhomme, LWV 43: Suite by Jean-Baptiste Lully
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Tempesta di Mare
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1670; Paris, France 
2.
Les élémens by Jean-Féry Rebel
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Tempesta di Mare
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1737; Paris, France 
3.
Alcyone: Suite by Marin Marais
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Tempesta di Mare
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1706 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  2 Customer Reviews )
 Interesting recording of orchestral works for the May 4, 2015 By Warren Harris See All My Reviews "This CD consists of early orchestral works for theatre from the late 1600s into the early 1700s, performed by the delightful Tempesta di Mare (the Philadelphia Baroque Orchestra). It is clear in each of the three works that they love this music and are committed to bringing it to live. The first piece is the music for a comedie-ballet, the “Suite from ‘Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme’ by Jean-Baptiste Lully, and as such there are some wonderful court dance tunes contained therein. Particularly enjoyable is the “Premier Air des Espagnols” with its wonderful rhythms (track 9), and the “Deuxieme Air des Espagnols” (track 10) is just lovely. The “Chaconne des Scaramouches” (track 12) is jaunty and playful and made this listener smile. The second work on the disc is the music from the ballet “Les Elements” by Jean-Fery Rebel. The 2nd movement Chaconne (track 14) is a real treat, and the Orchestra plays it with gusto and a sense of frivolity. “Tambourins” (track 17) features lively work from the woodwinds and guitar, while “Air pour l’Amour” (track 19) makes excellent use of the flute/recorder section, as well as the theorbo/guitar section. The third and final work is the “Suite from ‘Alcyone’” by Marin Marais, a Tragedie en musique (essentially a form of opera). There is an opening overture, a warm “Sarabande pour les memes” (excellent woodwind work on track 25), an energetic “Gigue pour les memes” (track 26), and the closing “Chaconne pour les Tritons et les Nereides” is a wonderful way to close this piece and the CD as well. The sound quality of this CD is very, very good, capturing the lively dynamism of the orchestra and all of the nuances of the guitar and theorbo section as well. The liner notes are well written and informative, providing both historical background as well as information about the nuances of the pieces themselves. For those of us that enjoy Baroque music, this is just good stuff. Sincerely recommended." Report Abuse
 Great music from the calm centre March 19, 2015 By Dean Frey See All My Reviews "Today we expect Historically Informed Performance (HIP) from our Baroque music, and more or less get it in most new recordings. But within HIP’s broad range from the dryly academic to the eccentric, edgy experiments on the fringes there are plenty of opportunities to entertain and inform. The new CD from the reliable Philadelphia Baroque Orchestra, also known as Tempesta di Mare, is on the careful side, but I admire the restraint, good taste and musicianship on display in their program of orchestral music from the French Baroque theatre. Jean-Fery Rebel’s Les Elements begins with chaos, with music that must have seemed very radical at the time. The music has a startling beginning, with all of the notes of the d minor scale being played at once. This has been called “the first tone cluster in the history of Western art music.” But the point of playing this music today is not to rival an Imax presentation of The Perfect Storm. Rebel says he “used the most widely accepted conventions” in his portrayal of the natural progression from chaos to “the moment when, subject to invariable laws, the elements took their prescribed place in the natural order.” It’s not that the world of the late 1730s knew any less about chaos than we do today; there was if anything less order in world affairs then than now. But on the stage at the French court of Louis XV was a real balance of “the natural order”, even if chaos swirled all around. And this sense of things returning to where they belong is everywhere in Tempesta di Mare’s program, in the music of Lully and Marais as well as Rebel. Distracted as we are by the all the shiny things at the edge, it’s nice to take a break and spend some time in the calm centre. By the way, has anyone noticed how much the beginning of Rebel’s Le Chaos sounds like the beginning of Bernard Herrmann’s score to Taxi Driver? I find the the similarity striking; perhaps this was an homage from Herrmann." Report Abuse
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