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Tartini: Violin Concertos / Daskalakis, Müller-brühl, Et Al


Release Date: 03/27/2007 
Label:  Naxos   Catalog #: 8570222   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Ariadne Daskalakis
Conductor:  Helmut Müller-Brühl
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Cologne Chamber Orchestra
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
Length: 1 Hours 13 Mins. 

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Notes and Editorial Reviews



TARTINI Violin Concertos: in E, D 50; in A, D 96; in G, D 80; in b, D 125; in D, D 28 Ariadne Daskalakis (vn); Helmut Müller-Brühl, cond; Cologne CO NAXOS 8.570222 (73:05)


Giuseppe Tartini, perhaps best known for his “Devil’s Read more Trill” Sonata—and even more for the cadenza that Fritz Kreisler wrote for it—has experienced a minor reawakening, and at least two different groups have undertaken to record complete sets of his violin concertos. At more than 100, the project would be a large one, even if, as in Naxos’s recording, a single disc can accommodate five concertos. Ariadne Daskalakis plays her handful of concertos on a 1769 G. B. Guadagnini violin with a “Tartini” bridge carved for it by Johannes Loescher in 2005 and with a Dodd bow from c. 1800. Since the ensemble applies results of research into period performance to modern instruments, they’ve created a sort of hybrid, as in performances by violinists like Gidon Kremer, Anne-Sophie Mutter, and Nigel Kennedy, that mix new and old. Naxos claims the first (D 50) and last (D 28) of the concertos in their program as world premiere recordings. Others, like the Concerto in A, D 96 (with Felix Ayo and the Orchestra Rossini di Pesaro on Dynamic CDS 92, 18:1), and the one in B Minor, D 125 ( with Felix Ayo and the Symphonia Perusina Orchestra on Dynamic CDS 131, 19: 1), have appeared in Fanfare during the last 15 years.


Daskalakis, in her notes, describe Tartini’s virtuosity as “not so straightforward” as Vivaldi’s, but a more direct comparison to his contemporary Pietro Locatelli might have been even more to the point. Tartini denigrated Vivaldi’s vocal music, in which he thought the composer tried to treat a singer’s neck like the neck of a violin; but Vivaldi’s slow movements—and the hypervirtuosic Locatelli’s as well—sang with an operatic lyricism equal to anything the more vocally oriented Tartini could create for his violinist. And it may be, too, that Tartini, who coded texts and delved into a sort of musicological mysticism, simply wasn’t as straightforward psychologically as were Vivaldi and Locatelli. Be that as it may, Daskalakis and the ensemble play Tartini’s concertos with a hard, sparkling brilliance, while continually allowing the composer’s personality to speak for itself. Daskalakis, whatever the equipment with which she realizes Tartini’s scores, sounds bright and cheerful in the upper registers and plays Tartini’s melodies in the fast movements with headlong energy enhanced by frequent triplets driving the rhythms forward, while she brings an insinuating vocal quality to slow movements like the Andante from the Concerto in G, D 80. Her technical command, though never the subject of the conversation, allows the dialogue all the wit and grace of which Tartini’s ideas seem capable. The engineers have placed her to the front of the ensemble’s sound (it may be no coincidence that Daskalakis describes Tartini’s compositions as “led musically by the top voice”), but the Cologne Chamber Orchestra lacks neither character nor definition.


In addition to the Italian violinists mentioned above, Elizabeth Wallfisch has also recorded some of Tartini’s concertos (from op. 1, Hyperion 67345, in a period-instrument version that I recommended enthusiastically in 27:2); but although Wallfisch draws from her instrument a more modern sound than might be expected, a better comparison to Naxos’s anthology might be to the more mellifluous sunshine Ayo spreads with the Symphonia Perusina Orchestra. Wallfisch approaches the coruscating virtuosity of the Guglielmos in their period-instrument sets with L’Arte dell’arco; but Daskalakis’s bright solidity doesn’t travel among the gentler, more rolling landscapes of Ayo’s groups (he also recorded some of the concertos with the Orchestra Rossini di Pesaro).


Daskalakis’s vivacious performances of these concertos, then, might make a genial introduction to the composer, were it not so likely that potential listeners might have already heard the “Devil’s Trill” in one of its 19th-century arrangements. But the performances and selection of works performed should be of interest to almost anyone, including those who may have already have acquired the Concertos in A Major and B Minor. Recommended.


FANFARE: Robert Maxham
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Works on This Recording

1.
Concerto for Violin in E major, D 50 by Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Ariadne Daskalakis (Violin)
Conductor:  Helmut Müller-Brühl
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Cologne Chamber Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 18th Century; Italy 
Venue:  Broadcast Hall, German Radio, Cologne, G 
Length: 15 Minutes 7 Secs. 
Notes: The cadenzas in this selection are by Ariadne Daskalakis and Sebastian Gottschick.
Broadcast Hall, German Radio, Cologne, Germany (10/14/2005 - 10/16/2005) 
2.
Concerto for Violin in A major, D 96 by Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Ariadne Daskalakis (Violin)
Conductor:  Helmut Müller-Brühl
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Cologne Chamber Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 18th Century; Italy 
Venue:  Broadcast Hall, German Radio, Cologne, G 
Length: 12 Minutes 57 Secs. 
Notes: The cadenzas in this selection are by Ariadne Daskalakis and Sebastian Gottschick.
Broadcast Hall, German Radio, Cologne, Germany (10/14/2005 - 10/16/2005) 
3.
Concerto for Violin in G major, D 80 by Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Ariadne Daskalakis (Violin)
Conductor:  Helmut Müller-Brühl
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Cologne Chamber Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 18th Century; Italy 
Venue:  Broadcast Hall, German Radio, Cologne, G 
Length: 15 Minutes 13 Secs. 
Notes: The cadenzas in this selection are the original ones by Tartini.
Broadcast Hall, German Radio, Cologne, Germany (10/14/2005 - 10/16/2005) 
4.
Concerto for Violin in B minor, D 125 by Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Ariadne Daskalakis (Violin)
Conductor:  Helmut Müller-Brühl
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Cologne Chamber Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 18th Century; Italy 
Venue:  Broadcast Hall, German Radio, Cologne, G 
Length: 13 Minutes 15 Secs. 
Notes: The cadenzas in this selection are by Ariadne Daskalakis and Sebastian Gottschick.
Broadcast Hall, German Radio, Cologne, Germany (10/14/2005 - 10/16/2005) 
5.
Concerto for Violin in D major, D 28 by Giuseppe Tartini
Performer:  Ariadne Daskalakis (Violin)
Conductor:  Helmut Müller-Brühl
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Cologne Chamber Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 18th Century; Italy 
Venue:  Broadcast Hall, German Radio, Cologne, G 
Length: 16 Minutes 34 Secs. 
Notes: The cadenzas in this selection are by Ariadne Daskalakis and Sebastian Gottschick.
Broadcast Hall, German Radio, Cologne, Germany (10/14/2005 - 10/16/2005) 

Sound Samples

Violin Concerto in E major, D. 50: I. Allegro
Violin Concerto in E major, D. 50: II. Grave
Violin Concerto in E major, D. 50: III. Presto
Violin Concerto in A major, D. 96: I. Allegro
Violin Concerto in A major, D. 96: II. Adagio
Violin Concerto in A major, D. 96: III. Presto
Violin Concerto in G major, D. 80: I. Allegro ma non presto
Violin Concerto in G major, D. 80: II. Andante
Violin Concerto in G major, D. 80: III. Allegro assai
Violin Concerto in B minor, D. 125, "Lascia ch'io dica addio": I. Allegro assai
Violin Concerto in B minor, D. 125, "Lascia ch'io dica addio": II. Larghetto, "Lascia ch'io dica addio"
Violin Concerto in B minor, D. 125, "Lascia ch'io dica addio": III. Allegro
Violin Concerto in D major, D. 28: I. Allegro
Violin Concerto in D major, D. 28: II. Andante
Violin Concerto in D major, D. 28: III. Allegro

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