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Carl Schuricht Collection - Historical Recordings 1950-1966


Release Date: 03/13/2007 
Label:  Hänssler Classic   Catalog #: 93140   Spars Code: ADD 
Composer:  Anton BrucknerLudwig van BeethovenWolfgang Amadeus MozartRobert Schumann,   ... 
Performer:  Marga HöffgenMaria StaderMurray DickieOtto Wiener,   ... 
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony OrchestraStuttgart Teacher's Choral SocietyStuttgart Bach Choir,   ... 
Number of Discs: 20 
Recorded in: Mixed 
Length: 20 Hours 0 Mins. 

CD not available: This title is currently only available as an MP3 download.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews



CARL SCHURICHT COLLECTION: 1950–1966 Various Soloists; Carl Schuricht, cond; Stuttgart RSO HÄNSSLER 93.140 (20 CDs: 22:46:00 + 1 DVD: 80:00)


CD 1: BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 7 10/24/1952 (33: 24). SCHUMANN Symphony No. 2 10/31/1959 (36:20)


CD 2: Read more class="COMPOSER12">BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 9 Maria Stader (sop); Marga Höffgen (alt); Murray Dickie (ten); Otto Wiener (bs); 9/13/1961 (64:24). Coriolan Overture 9/25/1952 (8:07)


CD 3: BRAHMS Symphony No. 2 3/16/1966 (41:30). Schicksalslied SWR Vocal Ensemble Stuttgart; 1/26/1954 (15:07). Nänie SWR Vocal Ensemble Stuttgart; 1/25/1954 (13:22)


CD 4: BRAHMS Ein Deutsches Requiem Maria Stader (sop); Hermann Prey (bar); SWR Vocal Ensemble Stuttgart; 11/7/1959 (68:12)


CD 5: BRUCKNER Symphony No. 4 4/5/1955 (69:03)


CD 6: BRUCKNER Symphony No. 5 10/18/1962 (72:54)


CD 7: BRUCKNER Symphony No. 7 3/6/1953 (60: 04). WAGNER Tristan und Isolde: Prelude and Liebestod 4/29/1950 (18:18)


CD 8: BRUCKNER Symphony No. 8 3/10/1954 (79:45)


CD 9: BRUCKNER Symphony No. 9 11/2/1951 (56: 00)


CD 10: GRIEG Im Herbst Concert Overture 12/2/1954 (11:21). BRUCH Violin Concerto No. 1 Hansheinz Schneeberger (vn); 9/15/1960 (25:11). GOETZ Violin Concerto Roman Schimmer (vn); 4/10/1953 (16:39). VOLKMANN Richard III Overture 9/12/1952 (13:23)


CD 11: HAYDN Symphony No. 100 4/8/1958 (22:27). Cello Concerto in D Enrico Mainardi (vc); 11/5/1950 (27:08). Symphony No. 95 4/5/1955 (19:52)


CD 12: MAHLER Symphony No. 3 (beginning) Rut Siewart (mez); SWR Vocal Ensemble Stuttgart; Boys’ Choir of the Eberhard-Ludwig-Gymnasium Stuttgart; 4/7/1960 (66:40)


CD 13: MAHLER Symphony No. 3 (conclusion) Rut Siewart (mez); SWR Vocal Ensemble Stuttgart; Boys’ Choir of the Eberhard-Ludwig-Gymnasium Stuttgart; 4/7/1960 (21:02). R. STRAUSS Ein Alpensinfonie 1/4-7/1955 (45:32)


CD 14: MOZART Symphony No. 35 7/4/1956 (16:53). Symphony No. 38 7/4/1956 (23:05) Symphony No. 40 5/19/1961 (23:23). No, no che non sei capace K 419 Ruth-Margret Pütz (sop); 4/9/1959 (4:23). Le Nozze di Figaro: “Porgi, amor” Elisabeth Schwarzkopf (sop); 4/6/1959 (4:18). Die Zauberflöte: “Dies Bildnis ist bezaubernd schön” Fritz Wunderlich (ten); 4/12/1959 (4:15)


CD 15: MOZART Piano Concerto No. 9 Clara Haskil (pn); 5/23/1952 (30:17)” Piano Concerto No. 19 Clara Haskil (pn); 7/4/1956 (27:17)


CD 16: VON REZNI?EK Theme and Variations Barry McDaniel (bar); 12/2/1954 (17:17). R. STRAUSS Guntram: Overture 3/20-23/1956 (11:16). PFITZNER Käthchen von Heilbronn: Overture 1/20/1956 (12:26). REGER Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Mozart 11/5/1950 (31:45)


CD 17: SCHUMANN Manfred Overture 9/14-15/1960 (11:22). Overture, Scherzo, and Finale 9/21/1954 (16:09). MENDELSSOHN Hebrides Overture 1/4/1955 (10:06). Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage 3/10/1961 (12:27). Midsummer Night’s Dream: Overture, Nocturne, and Scherzo 1/26/1954 (21:46)


CD 18: WAGNER Parsifal: Act I Prelude 3/17/1966 (12:31). Parsifal: Good Friday Music 9/23/1954 (9:49). Parsifal: Act I Prelude 3/17-19/1966 (5:30). Tristan und Isolde: Act I Prelude 4/29/1950 (18:18). Götterdämmerung: Dawn and Siegfried’s Rhine Journey 9/28/1955 (11:10). Götterdämmerung: Siegfried’s Death and Funeral March 9/28/1955 (7:12) Siegfried Idyll 9/28/1955 (17:20)


CD 19: MAHLER Symphony No. 2 (beginning) Hanni Mack-Cosack (sop); Hertha Töpper (alt); SWR Vocal Ensemble Stuttgart; Bach Choir Stuttgart; 4/17/1958 (45:43)


CD 20: MAHLER Symphony No. 2 (conclusion) Hanni Mack-Cosack (sop); Hertha Töpper (alt); SWR Vocal Ensemble Stuttgart; Bach Choir Stuttgart; 4/17/1958 (33:47). HAYDN Symphony No. 86 5/20/1954 (25:26)


DVD: Portrait of a Life (includes 1956 film of MOZART Symphony No. 35: Finale and 1958 film of STRAVINSKY Firebird Suite ) (80:00


CARL SCHURICHT COLLECTION II: 1951–1966 Various Soloists; Carl Schuricht, cond; Stuttgart RSO HANSSLER 93.292 (10 CDs: 10:53:06)


CD 1: BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 1 3/7/1961 (23: 29). Symphony No. 3 2/29/1952 (45:56)


CD 2: BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 4 4/8/1959 (33: 47). Symphony No. 5 4/10/1953 (31:22)


CD 3: BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 6 2/14/1957 (37:20). SCHUBERT Symphony No. 5 4/11/1960 (24:28)


CD 4: BRAHMS Symphony No. 1 9/18/1963 (42: 55). Symphony No. 3 12/2/1954 (34:47)


CD 5: BRAHMS Symphony No. 4 3/6/1964 (43: 46). Alto Rhapsody Lucretia West (alt); SWR Vocal Ensemble Stuttgart; 3/5/1964 (12:16). Tragic Overture 1/29/1954 (13:08)


CD 6: SCHUMANN Symphony No. 3 9/15/1960 (29: 44). R. STRAUSS Sinfonia domestica 12/14/1960 (42:05)


CD 7: WEBER Euryanthe: Overture 2/19/1962 (8:46). Oberon: Overture 4/10/1953 (9:32). WOLF Italian Serenade 2/14/1957 (7: 17). TCHAIKOVSKY Hamlet Overture 10/24/1952 (19: 05). VON REZNI?EK Donna Diana: Overture 2/12/1960 (5:44). BLACHER Concertante Music for Orchestra 10/29/1951 (9:42)


CD 8: DEBUSSY La Mer 5/23/1952 (23:28). RAPHAEL Sinfonia breve 3/14/1952 (21:20). OBOUSSIER Violin Concerto Roman Schimmer (vn); 1/4/1955 (13:29)


CD 9: LISZT Ce qu’on entend sur la montagne 3/7/1961 (27:30). REGER Variations and Fugue on a Merry Theme by Johann Adam Hiller 1/10/1953 (39:54)


CD 10: Rehearsal Excerpts from: BRAHMS Symphony No. 2: Finale 3/15-16/1966 (17:48). WAGNER Parsifal: Act I Prelude, Act III Good Friday Music and Conclusion 3/15-16/1966 (32:20)


In a review in 36:1 of a DVD of Beethoven and Haydn symphonies conducted by William Steinberg, I remarked that the adjective most often attached to that conductor by various commentators is “underrated.” In the case of Carl Schuricht, the adjective “overlooked” may also be added. Whenever his name is mentioned, many critics (though others are dismissive) will almost invariably nod their heads in approval and laud his considerable virtues; and yet, when a list of great conductors of the 20th century is drawn up, his name somehow is seldom mentioned, whereas those of estimable colleagues with far fewer recordings, such as Fritz Busch and Erich Kleiber, immediately come to mind.


I believe that there are two reasons for this neglect. First, for whatever reasons, Schuricht spent most of his professional career as the long-term head of second- and third-rank German orchestras, first in Wiesbaden (1911–44) and then in Stuttgart (1950–66). Other long-term professional associations, notably with the Paris Conservatoire Orchestra and the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, were likewise with lesser-rank ensembles. His relationship with the Vienna Philharmonic as a guest conductor, surely his best claim to wider fame, only really blossomed in the last 15 years of his life. While unsupported speculation is risky, circumstantial evidence suggests to me that Schuricht was—most unusually for a conductor—a person of considerable humility and strong loyalties, which would have led him to stay in places that gave him opportunities, appreciated his talents, and were not snakepits of political intrigue.


Second, Schuricht’s interpretive style is difficult to categorize readily. It does not have the strongly distinctive profile of figures such as Toscanini, Stokowski, Mengelberg, Furtwängler, Klemperer, or Walter. Instead, it has a certain humility and unassuming nature, in which the conductor places himself entirely at the service of the score, rather than imposing his personality upon it. That is not at all to say that it is bland and colorless; rather, its distinctive character is a consequence of the pursuit of certain musical means of expression, rather than as a consciously sought end.


What, then, are the hallmarks of Schuricht’s style? The single most important trait is that of transparency. There is not a single performance that has any trace of heaviness or opacity to it. Again, that is not to say that they sound thin or superficial; instead, it means that every part, no matter how minor, is heard with absolute clarity and in proper proportion to every other part. Time and again upon listening to a Schuricht performance, one hears every voice in complex chords and dense counterpoint, and subsidiary parts that without a score in hand one tends to forget, and yet these appear with a natural balance that is free from artifice and exaggeration.


Second, there is the resulting texture of orchestral sound. Some conductors (e.g., Furtwängler and Walter) built their orchestral sound from the bottom up, beginning with the bass line as a foundation; others (e.g., Toscanini) do so from the top down, starting with the melody line as paramount. Schuricht, however, creates orchestral texture as a French pastry chef creates a croissant, with multiple fine layers of instrumental color enfolded upon one another.


A third and related key trait is that of fluidity. Tempos are generally brisk but never rushed, nor dramatically driven in the manner of Toscanini or Solti. Instead, there is a lyrical grace—not the richer, creamier Viennese lyricism of a Walter, but rather that of a light skiff floating upon and neatly threading watery waves.


Fourth, there is almost always a sense of spontaneity, as if a work is being encountered afresh. Consequently, while the broad interpretive outlines for a given piece remain the same, its actual realization from one concert to another often varies quite significantly. (I also find that, as a result, his live performances generally have a greater spark of animation than do corresponding studio accounts, though the latter have tidier orchestral playing and better recorded sound.)


Finally, Schuricht’s interpretations have great integrity. In the more literal sense of that word, they are structurally well constituted and proportioned, avoiding exaggerations in dynamics, accents, or alternations in tempos. In the more figurative sense, they are consistently engaging and interesting, but in a manner that always directs one’s attention to the music itself, rather than to what is being done to perform or interpret it. It is a somewhat self-effacing conductorial art, from which the listener comes away more inclined to think, “What a fabulous piece of music!” rather than “What a fabulous performance!” Lest my meaning be mistaken, that is no mean bit of praise from me.


Unlike those of many of his fellow German conductors, Schuricht’s interpretations are not weightily metaphysical. Rather, they simply seek to unfold the music with clarity and simplicity, and to allow hearers to bring their own thoughts and feelings to it, rather than confronting them with his own. Admittedly, this approach does have its corresponding limitations. One will not turn to Schuricht for performances of the spiritually transcendental nature of a Furtwängler, the searing, taut drama of a Toscanini, the sonic voluptuousness of Stokowski, and so on. The emphasis on transparency and equipoise of instrumental lines means that the bass line tends to be relatively light and lacking the heft needed to make certain climactic passages overwhelming. Nevertheless, it is greatly rewarding music-making, and fully worthy of the attention lavished upon these more famous figures. As colleague Jerry Dubins aptly noted in a review from 2005: “... even if he may have lacked some of their charismatic character, his was unquestionably one of the keenest and most insightful of musical intellects.”


Schuricht’s commercial discography is not large, and rather spotty (for a comprehensive list, see page.freett.com/Schuricht/SchurichtCD.htm). With the exception of a rendition of the overture to Wagner’s Der fliegende Holländer set down in 1929, it begins with various recordings (most notably of Bruckner’s Seventh and Ninth symphonies, and the First, Third, Fourth, Sixth, and Seventh symphonies of Beethoven) made with the Berlin Philharmonic and other orchestras of that municipality between 1936 and 1943. In 1946 Schuricht began his association on records with the Suisse Romande and Paris Conservatoire ensembles, with the Vienna Philharmonic added in 1952, in a series of recordings made for Decca through 1955. After Decca dropped him from its roster (with scurrilous behind-the-scenes defamations suggesting that he was becoming senile), he moved over to EMI in 1957 to record his cycle of Beethoven symphonies with the Paris Conservatoire Orchestra, followed by the Third, Eighth, and Ninth Symphonies of Bruckner, plus Mozart’s Symphonies Nos. 38 and 41, plus the Violin Concerto No. 3 (with Willy Boskovsky), all recorded with the Vienna Philharmonic between 1960 and 1965.


Schuricht’s historic recordings generally do not come off well, because they fail to convey adequately his distinctive orchestral sound palette. The prewar recordings sound dull, and the postwar ones by Decca (released in a five-CD set; see the review by Mortimer H. Frank in 28:5) suffer from extremely harsh treble frequencies and other defects. Consequently, it is a cause for rejoicing that Hänssler has chosen to commemorate Schuricht with these two boxed sets of broadcast and concert performances from his Stuttgart years. The first set of 20 CDs was actually released back in 2004, and its individual discs were then also issued separately (at least two, Vols. 15 and 18, also enjoyed prior releases before being included in this set). Twelve of those 20 individual releases were previously reviewed in these pages, as follows:


Vols. 1-2: Mortimer H. Frank, 29:2


Vols. 3-4: Jerry Dubins, 29:1


Vols. 6-7: Robert McColley, 29:4


Vol. 15: Barry Brenesal, 27:2


Vol. 16: Barry Brenesal, 30:5


Vol. 17: Robert McColley, 30:1


Vol. 18: William Youngren, 25:5


Vols. 19-20: Paul Ingram, 31:4


In addition, the following performances in these two sets have been released on other labels that likewise were reviewed here:


Wagner: Tristan Prelude and Liebestod ; Reger: Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Mozart ; Haydn: Cello Concerto in D; Bruckner: Symphony No. 9 (Music and Arts; Barry Brenesal, 25:4)


Schumann: Symphony No. 3, Manfred Overture (Adès; James Miller, 12:6)


Haydn: Symphony No. 86 (Medici Arts; Jeffrey J. Lipscomb, 33:3)


Both sets provide ample documentation of dates, venues, and timings for each performance, though the booklets for the two sets have radically different designs. I prefer that of the first set, which lists the performance dates and venues in the main table of contents instead of at the end of the booklet, and also has a larger typeface that is far easier to read, though it is also far less compact. The first set appears to no longer be carried by most online retailers; however, it can be had directly from Hänssler at haenssler-classic.de/en/home.html at a price of 80 Euros, far less than the few other websites still offering it now demand.


As previous reviewers have noted, the Stuttgart orchestra was at the time of Schuricht’s tenure only a mid-rank ensemble; the strings are fine if not stellar, the woodwinds generally strong and characterful, but the brass section given to more than its share of cracked, lipped, and sour notes in the more demanding pieces. That said, the overall quality improves over the years, along with that of the recorded sound, which in the early 1950s is a bit thin, dry, and congested (though generally very clear and with virtually no background noise), but becomes noticeably richer and warmer by the later part of the decade. However, even the earliest performances in this set are sonically preferable to the aforementioned Decca set.


On then, at last, to the performances themselves. Since space limitations preclude extensive discussion of each one individually, I will group and consider them collectively by composer across the two sets, rather than proceeding disc by disc. When appropriate, I will defer to the comments of my colleagues in their previous reviews.


Between the two sets, seven of Beethoven’s nine symphonies are included. It would have been nice if Hänssler could have found performances of the Second and Eighth Symphonies; let’s hope that such exist and will appear in the future. Schuricht’s approach to Beethoven is brisk, linear, and energetic, classical rather than romantic in outlook. Those of the First, Fourth, Sixth, and Seventh are almost playful; those of the Third, Fifth, and Ninth create their drama by taut rhythmic drive instead of harmonic weightiness. Regarding the Seventh and Ninth Symphonies and the Coriolan Overture on CDs 1-2 in the first set, I concur with Frank’s judgment, though I hold this Seventh in higher estimation than he does. The Ninth is indeed a disappointment (as is the somewhat slack Coriolan Overture), though it is far superior to the poor 1954 performance released by Music and Arts that Frank also discusses. Both are much inferior to Schuricht’s studio recording, a good if not truly great account which should be heard in the stereo Testament release rather than the monaural EMI one. (A live 1965 performance with the Paris National Radio Orchestra that has circulated among private collectors has inferior sound but a tremendous febrile intensity that makes me prefer it interpretively to the studio version.) Schuricht’s interpretive profile remains highly consistent between Stuttgart and Paris; only three movements out of the seven symphonies—the finale of the Fifth, the scherzo of the Sixth, and the Adagio of the Ninth—differ appreciably in timings, with the Paris studio accounts being about a minute slower in each instance. While none of the performances on CDs 1-3 in the second set will displace those from the conductor’s EMI studio set (or, despite its relatively poor sound, the dynamic Fifth Symphony from the Decca set) they are all fine renditions that fans of this conductor will heartily welcome.


Schuricht’s Brahms is quite another matter. Here his approach is far more romantic, with more spacious tempos (though still more brisk than that of many rivals) and a far more liberal use of rubato than he employs for Beethoven. Along with the symphonies of Bruckner and Mahler, those of Brahms brought out a mercurial streak in the conductor not generally encountered in his other performances, and surviving alternative versions of these pieces can differ radically from one another. For example, a 1953 performance of the Brahms First with the Suisse Romande ensemble has a finale with an utterly bizarre series of unmotivated and unprepared shifts in tempos, and bears virtually no resemblance to the outing in this set. Likewise, in 34:3 Jerry Dubins describes in detail a 1952 performance of the Fourth that features similarly extreme interpretive devices, whereas in 13:2 John Tuska gave a rave review to a far more mainstream 1961 performance of the Brahms Fourth with the Bavarian Radio Symphony as “among the truly great performances.” (His descriptors—“alive with delicate phrasing that illumines a magical poetry,” “resplendently lyrical and informed by an amazingly transparent clarity,” and “iridescent and profoundly tender in the more meditative moments”—express succinctly aspects of Schuricht’s art upon which I expounded above in more detail.)


Given that Schuricht only recorded the Second Symphony commercially, and that in Decca’s unflattering acoustic, the appearance of a complete Brahms symphony set by him is an occasion for celebration. (Other live performances of all four symphonies, particularly the Fourth, have sporadically appeared on CD, but virtually all were on obscure labels of suspect quality and are long out of print.) If not possessing the unique autumnal glow that Bruno Walter brought to these works as their nonpareil interpreter, these are nonetheless accounts of great cohesiveness and narrative drama, with many excellent touches. Tempos are measured, phrasing is gently rounded and dovetailed, sharp accents are eschewed, and the deft balancing of instrumental voices results in sonorities from the woodwinds akin to those of organ reed stops. The ever-tricky violin-horn duet in the Andante of the First has an ideal shimmering transparency and grace, and exemplifies Schuricht’s conductorial virtues throughout. A bit curiously, Schuricht takes the exposition repeat in the opening movement of the Third, but not in the other symphonies. Those who come to Brahms seeking high drama will come away disappointed; those prepared to accept a more subdued and reflective approach will reap considerable rewards. Finally, I will add that I concur entirely with the praise Dubins gives to these performances, and particularly of the Deutsches Requiem , a truly great account that all lovers of that work should seek to acquire even if they are not interested in Schuricht in general.


Although Bruckner’s symphonies held a place of great significance in Schuricht’s repertoire, he was able to leave posterity studio accounts of only four of them—the Third, Seventh, Eighth, and (twice) Ninth. That of the Third holds a special place in my affections, as it was my introduction to Bruckner on records. As a teenager I happened to catch one of Leonard Bernstein’s very last narrated television presentations, an hour-long program titled “Bruckner: The Fourth ‘B’?,” in which he discussed and conducted the first movement of the Third. I hightailed it over to E. J. Korvette’s, pawed through the bargain bin, and bought the Seraphim issue of the Schuricht LP for $2.99. The work as a whole baffled me for several years, but I gradually warmed to it and to Bruckner as a whole, and to this day I rank that performance alongside the DG account of Eugen Jochum as one of the two finest recordings of that work.


Virtually all of the comments I made concerning Schuricht’s Brahms interpretations apply to his Bruckner as well. One will not find here the transcendental mysticism of Eugen Jochum or the apocalyptic cataclysms of Furtwängler, my two personal benchmarks for Bruckner. Here the approach is smoother and more lyrical, making points through textural transparency and balancing of voices rather than monumental power. While the majority of Schuricht’s surviving accounts of Bruckner symphonies are on the brisk side, that could vary wildly; whereas his EMI studio account of the Eighth comes in at a whirlwind 71:16 overall, this performance and the 1955 Hamburg account both come in at just under 80 minutes. (The major differences are in the Adagio —the EMI recording is a blistering 21:47 whereas the live performances are 25:43 and 26: 55—and the finale—EMI comes in at a hectic 19:45, as opposed to 23:29 and 21:33 in the live performances.) By contrast, his interpretations of the Fifth, Seventh, and Ninth remained far more consistent (there are no other versions by him of the Third and Fourth), though in the Stuttgart version of the Fifth he takes a large cut in the reprise of the scherzo, resulting in a timing of 9:09 as opposed to 12:33 in the uncut and renowned 1963 Salzburg performance with the Vienna Philharmonic that is easily the preferable account. (In 13:6 William Zagorski termed the Vienna outing “not only the finest Schuricht performance I have yet encountered, but also one of the finest Bruckner Fifths to come my way.”)


As for the last three Bruckner symphonies, the historical recordings of the Seventh (1938) and Ninth (1943) are for me non-starters; they seem lackluster and featureless, something I suspect is due in part to the limitations on recorded sound from that era being unable to capture faithfully Schuricht’s distinctive sound palette. An inferior account of the Seventh with the Hague Philharmonic that once circulated on a Nonesuch LP can also be disregarded. That leaves this performance and a 1954 Hamburg performance with the NDR Symphony. I agree fully with Robert McColley’s comments on the merits of the Stuttgart versions of the Fifth and Seventh Symphonies, both on their own terms and vis-a-vis their rivals. Colin Anderson gave rave reviews in 29:5 to the NDR performances of the Seventh and Eighth Symphonies. While I agree with much of what he has to say, I find the Stuttgart accounts of both works (which he does not mention) to be even better, though I have caveats about each of Schuricht’s three surviving versions of the Eighth. Unlike many critics, I have never cared much for the EMI studio account; the opening movement lacks momentum, the Adagio is so rushed that it loses all majesty, the finale is somewhat disjointed in its tempo transitions, and some of the woodwind playing is surprisingly sour. In any case, it is quite atypical when compared to the two live accounts. Personally, I find the Stuttgart performance to have superior choices of tempos, smoother transitions between sections within movements, better balancing of instrumental voices, and superior recorded sound. Unfortunately, it also has by far the highest number of flubs by the brass instruments in all the performances on these 30 CDs; your tolerance for those will determine which version you prefer. As for the Ninth, there are at least five surviving accounts: the two studio versions, and live performances from Stuttgart (1951), Hamburg (1960), and Munich (1962); except for that from Hamburg, which is some six minutes slower overall, they do not differ greatly from one another interpretively. Jeffrey J. Lipscomb in a review in 35:3 of the Hamburg performance released by Tahra adroitly compares the Hamburg, Munich, and Vienna renditions; in 24:5 Michael Jameson ably reviews the Munich performance issued by Orfeo in detail and likewise compares it to the Vienna studio version. This Stuttgart account is welcome, but does not change the overall rankings; the Vienna and Munich versions remain the preferred ones.


In my experience, I cannot offhand think of any conductor who has excelled equally in both Bruckner and Mahler (which, given the radically different spiritual temperaments of those two composers and their works, is scarcely surprising). Schuricht was definitely more of a Brucknerian, though he did have impressive Mahler credentials, having conducted the mighty Eighth Symphony already in 1913 and staged a Mahler festival a decade after that. His accounts here of Mahler’s Second and Third Symphonies—the only Mahler symphonies of which we have recordings by Schuricht—while not without interest, are simply not on the same plane as his renditions of Bruckner. In both works the biggest problems occur in the opening movements, where his tempos are too rushed and his transitions between sections rather abrupt. In 14:1 Peter J. Rabinowitz reviewed and dismissed another performance of the Second by Schuricht, a 1958 account with the L’Orchestre Nationale de Paris. (Benjamin Pernick similarly disparaged in 13:1 the separately released performance of the Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen from the same concert.) I have not heard that one, but I would gather that this account is significantly superior to that one (see Paul Ingram’s detailed but somewhat discursive review of it in 31:4). While Rabinowitz’s characterization of the interpretation of the Second as “straightforward” applies here as well, I do not find that necessarily a bad thing, as Mahler the neurotic high priest of Weltschmerz has by now been done to death. If relatively understated and lacking in bold relief, its presentation of an honest, unvarnished account of the score comes as something of a relief. Though alto Hertha Töpper is somewhat unfocused and blowsy, she and soprano Hanni Mack-Cosack sing with feeling, and the choir (which has excellent diction) rises in the final pages to an unexpected level of ecstatic fervor exceeding that of many more highly regarded recordings. In the Third, the orchestra often simply seems too lightweight to convey Mahler’s riotous panoply of nature. (Also be warned that the second movement jarringly follows the first without any intervening pause.) However, Rut Siewart is an excellent soloist, and the choral forces again do themselves proud, with Schuricht scoring a fine interpretive point by slowing down the middle of the fifth movement to cast an extra pall of sorrow over the choral lament. I will also observe that each time I listen to these performances my evaluation of them becomes more positive; while they will never rise beyond the second tier of any Mahler discography, they nonetheless pay real dividends with repeated exposure.


To a lesser degree, the aforementioned divide I find in conductors regarding their interpretative abilities in Bruckner and Mahler also applies to Mozart and Haydn; most maestros will show a greater affinity for one or the other. In Schuricht’s case, he was quite good at both, but for me his forte lay with Haydn. If by modern standards these are not the most witty and bubbly accounts of those works to be found, his traversals of the symphonies 86, 95, and 100 nevertheless show an indisputable mastery of the true Haydn style. Interpretively forward looking for their time, they feature brisk tempos and light-footed grace in phrasing and rhythm, with transparent textures that let every instrumental part shine through. Hence I am in basic agreement with Jeffrey J. Lipscomb’s overall positive assessment of the Symphony No. 86 in his review of its Medici Arts release, as opposed to Paul Ingram’s negative assessment (I have not heard the other Schuricht account of that symphony which Lipscomb mentions). The account of the Cello Concerto in D is unfortunately less felicitous, with a bloated, heavy feel to it; perhaps Schuricht was deferring to his soloist, Enrico Mainardi. In the three Mozart symphonies, Schuricht is quite capable in Nos. 35 and 38, displaying many of the same virtues as in his Haydn performances. However, there is also a slight underlying metrical stiffness, which becomes apparent the moment one compares them to Bruno Walter’s classic accounts with their subtle plasticity. The reverse situation holds for the Symphony No. 40, however; it is the one Mozart symphony that I’ve always felt Walter never got quite right, with his treatment of it being too heavy-handed. Here Schuricht offers a superb account, one of the most convincing of this work I’ve ever heard. As for the two piano concerti with Clara Haskil, I am pleased as on many previous occasions to endorse Barry Brenesal’s excellent review and high commendation of these fine performances. The three arias are a minor bonus, especially since Schwarzkopf and Wunderlich made studio recordings of theirs under superior conditions in complete opera sets.


Of the major German romantic composers between Beethoven and Brahms, Schuricht left behind studio recordings of four Mendelssohn overtures, the Schubert “Unfinished” Symphony, and Schumann’s symphonies Nos. 2 and 3 plus the Overture, Scherzo, and Finale and the Manfred Overture, all recorded for Decca. The Mendelssohn overtures disc was one of Schuricht’s most celebrated commercial releases; here its contents are duplicated, with the addition of the three most common excerpts from the Midsummer Night’s Dream music. I have never shared that general critical enthusiasm, as I prefer Mendelssohn performances that are far more dramatic and less soft-grained (cf., Furtwängler’s stupendous 1951 live account of the Hebrides Overture). However, if you do admire those studio versions, then you will welcome these, which are interpretively almost identical and preserved in far more agreeable recorded sound (see Robert McColley’s commendatory review in 30:1). One wishes that Hänssler had seen fit to issue Schuricht’s Stuttgart performances of the “Italian” and “Reformation” symphonies, which have circulated on the bootleg Rare Moth CD label. The Schubert Fifth surprises by being a delightfully old-fashioned, romantic performance not far removed interpretively from Bruno Walter’s contemporaneous New York Philharmonic recording, albeit with one degree less of Viennese Schmaltz . The two Weber overtures receive solid, straightforward readings that, as with some of Schuricht’s renditions of Mozart, have a slight trace of metrical stiffness.


Regarding the Schumann pieces, this Stuttgart account of the Second Symphony is slightly slower throughout than the Decca studio version but otherwise not much different interpretively, and is preferable due to its far more pleasant recorded sound. I do not care for the performance, but as I am extremely difficult to please when it comes to recordings of Schumann’s symphonies, readers should take that under advisement. (For the record, my benchmark for the Second is Giuseppe Sinopoli and the Vienna Philharmonic on DG.) Overall it is a mainstream performance, with the scherzo on the slow side. Back in 12:6 James Miller curtly dismissed both the studio recording of the “Rhenish” Symphony and this live performance, saying that the former was “hard-driven, loudly and roughly played, and closely recorded, which emphasized the latter two qualities” while the latter was “only slightly less fast and brusque than the London one and slightly better played.” Here I beg to differ; both accounts, particularly this live one, have long ranked as my favorite performances of the work (though there is some retouching of the orchestration, particularly noticeable in the third movement). I do not find the playing either loud or particularly rough (though neither orchestra was a refined ensemble), and for “hard driven” I would substitute “energetic” and “exhilarating.” Curiously, this issue has far more recessed sound and thus less impact than the Adès release reviewed by Miller, and the movement timings differ in no consistent pattern – 8:05, 5: 34, 5:08, 4:49, 5:30 (Adès) vs. 8:20, 5:49, 5:35, 4:47, 5:11 (Hänssler). I agree with McColley in liking the Manfred Overture far more than did Miller, though it is somewhat low-key and lacking the high voltage that Munch or Bernstein brought to it. The Overture, Scherzo, and Finale was a Schuricht specialty, and here everyone seems to agree that his accounts are among the very finest; as before, I would prefer this Stuttgart version due to the superior recorded sound.


Since Schuricht conducted virtually no opera performances in his career (though a Hänsel und Gretel has just appeared on CD), familiar “bleeding chunks” of orchestral excerpts from Wagner operas are all we have from him in that repertoire. The late William Youngren lavished high praise on these renditions in his review back in 25: 5, and I happily refer readers to his typically detailed and insightful comments. Liszt’s Ce qu’on entend sur la montagne , the longest of his 13 purely orchestral tone poems, is a “sport” in the Schuricht discography, as no other performances by him of the composer’s works appear to have survived. It is not a piece I know well enough to compare against other recordings; suffice it to say that I do find this to be a stirring and effective performance, featuring the same virtues that Schuricht brought to his readings of the tone poems of Richard Strauss.


Among the fin de siècle romantics, the two composers that held a special place in Schuricht’s repertoire were Richard Strauss and Max Reger, the latter being one of Schuricht’s teachers. The conductor made a studio recording in 1941 of the Symphonia domestica with (quite oddly) the orchestra of La Scala in Milan; this Stuttgart account supersedes that one, both sonically and interpretively, in every way. I join many other critics in finding this work to be bottom-drawer Strauss, a grab-bag of recycled orchestral rhetorical gestures used elsewhere to far better effect; but Schuricht obviously enjoyed it, and renders every bar with such transparency and elfin lightness that I found myself almost liking it in spite of myself. Similar merits characterize the account here of the much more worthwhile Alpensinfonie ; while it lacks the powerhouse climaxes of Reiner and Solti, one marvels at the translucence and delicacy of the orchestral timbres. Unlike Barry Brenesal I have a certain fondness for Strauss’s early pseudo-Wagnerian opera Guntram , but we both agree on the merits of this performance of its act II Prelude, and also on those of Hans Pfitzner’s overture to Käthchen von Heilbronn , part of the incidental music the composer wrote in 1905 to the play by Heinrich von Kleist. I wish that Hänssler somehow could have included the surviving Stuttgart performance of Tod und Verklärung as well.


The two sets of Reger Variations presented here are major works, lasting 30 minutes (Mozart) and 40 minutes (Hiller) apiece. The theme of the Mozart Variations is the first subject of the opening movement of the Piano Sonata in A, K 331; the work was once Reger’s main toehold in the repertoire, but it has fallen into desuetude. Even with Schuricht’s committed advocacy I find the piece a bore, particularly its closing fugue that is a model of sterile academic pedantry. Johann Adam Hiller [or Hüller] (1728–1804) was the originator of the Singspiel and the first Kapellmeister of the Leipzig Gewandhaus beginning in 1781. The theme employed by Reger is taken from his Der Ärndkranz (also spelled Der Aerndtekranz and Der Erntekranz ), a Singspiel premiered in 1771 (alternatively dated to 1758 or 1773 in some sources). This is altogether a more charming and entertaining score, and Schuricht does it full justice.


Finally, there is a miscellany of mostly lesser-known composers to consider, represented by individual works that are mostly discographic rarities. While Tchaikovsky himself obviously needs no introduction, his Hamlet Fantasy-Overture remains a seldom-played score; Schuricht gives it a highly dramatic performance that whets one’s appetite to hear his surviving Stuttgart account of the Symphony No. 4. The even more rarely heard Im Herbst (In Autumn) Overture of Edvard Grieg receives exactly the kind of heartfelt, full-throated performance needed to advance its unpretentious melodic appeal. The brief and charming Italian Serenade of Hugo Wolf receives an equally effective reading. Friedrich Robert Volkmann (1815–83) spent most of his career in Budapest. A good friend of Johannes Brahms, he is remembered today primarily for his orchestral serenades and other lighter music. His Richard III Overture dates from 1870 and is one of his last compositions; its musical vocabulary lies about halfway between Brahms and Liszt, while its thematic content is thoroughly unmemorable. Emil Nikolaus Freiherr von Rezni?ek (1860–1945) is now recalled almost solely for the overture to his 1894 comic opera Donna Diana , which receives here a suitably spirited account; I have nothing to add to Barry Brenesal’s comments on the more substantial Theme and Variations , save that baritone Barry McDaniel sings his brief solo part well.


The thrice-familiar Bruch Violin Concerto No. 1 has a prominent place in the conductor’s discography, thanks to his 1946 Decca recording of the work with Georg Kuhlenkampff. That studio recording is in poor sound, and I personally am not a fan of that violinist. This account, in far superior sound, is one of the finest of the work (exceptionally dear to my heart) I’ve ever heard. Swiss violinist Hansheinz Schneeberger is primarily remembered today for having given the world premiere performances of the posthumously recovered Violin Concerto No. 1 of Bela Bartók and the Violin Concerto of Frank Martin. If he is no Heifetz or Milstein technically, he is nevertheless a very fine interpreter who has the full measure of the score, and in Schuricht the orchestral part for once has a conductor who does more than beat time, infusing the proceedings with real drama. The brief and rarely heard Violin Concerto of Hermann Goetz (1840-1876) is a work of considerable melodic charm that should be heard more often than it is; I can find no information about soloist Roman Schimmer except that he was a professor at the music conservatory in Trossingen, in the far southwestern corner of Germany. As a violinist he is a step below Schneeberger, but nonetheless fulfills his role ably.


Although little represented in his discography, Schuricht was a committed advocate of 20th-century tonal composers, particularly the Impressionists and neo-Impressionists (he was Germany’s chief champion of the music of Frederick Delius) and the neoclassicists (Stravinsky, Hindemith, and numerous lesser-known figures in Germany). His take here on Debussy’s La Mer is quite possibly the most unusual I have ever heard of that piece. Banish any thoughts of swirling, hazy blends of harmonies; this is a pointillistic approach with a vengeance, with every single individual note of the score etched in the highest possible relief. It sounds like no other performance of anything by Debussy I’ve ever heard, and at first it threw me for quite a loop, but I quickly fell under its spell and became absolutely fascinated with its incredible clarity and balance of instrumental detail. In its own idiosyncratic way, it is a truly great performance.


Boris Blacher (1903–1975) was born in a Russian-speaking community in Niuzhuang [Yingkou], China. His parents were Germans from the Estonian city of Tallinn; his father was director of the operations in Siberia, China, and Manchuria of a German-Russian bank. Blacher was raised in various cities in China and Siberia, and attended school in the northeastern Chinese city of Harbin from 1919 to 1922, becoming fluent in German, Russian, Chinese, English, and Italian. In 1922 he moved to Berlin to pursue studies in architecture and mathematics, before turning to ones in music composition in 1924. Under the Third Reich he was deprived of his teaching position at the Dresden Conservatory in 1939 and accused of writing “degenerate” music. After World War II he joined the faculty of the Music Academy of Berlin in 1948 and served as its president from 1953 to his death, where his pupils included Gottfried von Einem, Aribert Reimann, George Crumb, and Richard Wernick. He wrote 12 operas, five ballets, a symphony, and concertos for piano (3), violin, viola, cello, clarinet, and trumpet. His Concertante Music for Orchestra dates from 1937, and was given its world premiere by Carl Schuricht with the Berlin Philharmonic. It is a tonally centered, neoclassical work that in its thematic rigor and rhythmic jauntiness could almost pass for the finale of one of the symphonies of Walter Piston.


Günther Raphael (1903–1960) was born in Berlin; the first of his five symphonies had its world premiere with the Leipzig Gewandhaus under Wilhelm Furtwängler in 1926, and the first two of his six string quartets received their initial performances at almost the same time from the renowned Busch Quartet. He is perhaps better remembered today, however, for creating the first performing edition for orchestra of the youthful First Cello Concerto of Antonin Dvo?ák from its original cello and piano manuscript following its discovery in 1918. In 1934 the Nazis declared him to be a Halbjude (half-Jew) and deprived him of his teaching position at the Leipzig Conservatory. He married shortly thereafter and moved to Meiningen, where he contracted the tuberculosis that eventually would kill him. Although he managed to survive the Nazi regime while remaining in Germany, afterwards he was never able to regain his original degree of professional stature. The Sinfonia breve dates from 1949. Cast in three movements and lasting slightly over 20 minutes, its musical contents are distantly related to Hindemith on the one hand (in the faster, more rhythmically driven sections) and Bartók on the other (in its more languorous passages and harmonies) without sounding quite like either one. A mostly martial opening Allegro con brio movement is followed by an alternately ruminative and spookily agitated Rondo: Allegretto , and then concludes with an Allegro molto in which dance-like motifs alternate with returns to the opening martial thematic materials.


Very little information is available on Robert Oboussier (1900–1957). He was born in Antwerp and studied composition in Heidelberg and Mannheim. Most of his compositions date from 1922–1930, after which he was primarily a music critic, with his most important work focusing upon the Berlin musical scene during the 1930s. After spending several years in Paris, followed by brief stints in Florence and Munich, he finally settled in Zurich in 1939, where he was stabbed to death by a teenage youth following a homosexual liaison. The Violin Concerto dates from 1953; cast in three movements (Maestoso-Allegro, Grave, Allegro vivace) , it combines the neoclassicism of Stravinsky with some neoromantic melodic gestures. Rudolf Schimmer is again the soloist; he and Schuricht give the piece their all, but it remains an irremediably tedious affair.


The bonus DVD is of little value. It gives a rather sketchy overview of Schuricht’s life and career, and includes the only two known surviving film clips of him conducting, both made in rehearsal studios. The 1956 finale of Mozart’s Symphony No. 35 adds nothing not already provided by the audio recording of the complete work. The Firebird Suite, lasting about 20 minutes, is a huge disappointment and the one total failure in this set, being totally wooden and colorless. One can only regret that some other occasion was not found to do Schuricht justice on film in concert. The audio clips of Schuricht in rehearsal likewise add little of interest, as they are mostly straight run-throughs with only occasional brief interjections by the conductor.


In sum, despite some arguably needless overlap with the conductor’s studio discography (the Beethoven symphonies and the Bruckner Ninth), and wasted space (the DVD and the rehearsal excerpts), if you have any interest in Carl Schuricht, your investment in these two sets will be more than amply rewarded. Despite occasional shortcomings in the orchestral execution, the vast majority of the performances exemplify his art at its very considerable best. If you have not encountered Schuricht to any significant degree before, then I would encourage you to try at least the 10-CD set for starters. These collections are long overdue and well deserved tributes to a podium artist whose legacy ought to be preserved and propagated. I dearly hope that Hänssler will have the vision (and the sales of these two sets) to follow up with a Volume III, perhaps drawing upon radio archives outside of Stuttgart as well. Very highly recommended.


FANFARE: James A. Altena
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Works on This Recording

1.
Symphony no 4 in E flat major, WAB 104 "Romantic" by Anton Bruckner
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1874; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 04/05/1955 
Venue:  Live  Stuttgart-Degerloch, Waldheim 
Length: 69 Minutes 3 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording.
Composition written: Vienna, Austria (1874 - 1886). 
2.
Symphony no 5 in B flat major, WAB 105 by Anton Bruckner
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1875-1876; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 10/18/1962 
Venue:  Live  Liederhall, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 72 Minutes 54 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
3.
Symphony no 7 in E major, WAB 107 by Anton Bruckner
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1881-1883; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 03/06/1953 
Venue:  Live  Stuttgart-Degerloch, Waldheim 
Length: 60 Minutes 4 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
4.
Symphony no 8 in C minor, WAB 108 by Anton Bruckner
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 03/10/1954 
Venue:  Live  Stuttgart-Degerloch, Waldheim 
Length: 79 Minutes 45 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording.
Composition written: Vienna, Austria (1884 - 1887).
Composition revised: Vienna, Austria (1887 - 1890). 
5.
Symphony no 9 in D minor, WAB 109 by Anton Bruckner
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1891-1896; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 11/02/1951 
Venue:  Live  Stuttgart-Degerloch, Waldheim 
Length: 56 Minutes 0 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
6.
Symphony no 7 in A major, Op. 92 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1811-1812; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 10/24/1952 
Venue:  Live  Stuttgart-Degerloch, Waldheim 
Length: 33 Minutes 24 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
7.
Symphony no 9 in D minor, Op. 125 "Choral" by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Marga Höffgen (Alto), Maria Stader (Soprano), Murray Dickie (Tenor),
Otto Wiener (Bass)
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra,  Stuttgart Teacher's Choral Society,  Stuttgart Bach Choir  ... 
Period: Classical 
Written: 1822-1824; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 09/13/1961 
Venue:  Live  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 64 Minutes 24 Secs. 
Language: German 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
8.
Symphony no 35 in D major, K 385 "Haffner" by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1782; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 07/04/1956 
Venue:  Live  Ludwigsburg, Germany 
Length: 16 Minutes 53 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
9.
Symphony no 40 in G minor, K 550 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1788; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 05/19/1961 
Venue:  Live  Rokoko Theater, Schwetzingen 
Length: 23 Minutes 23 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
10.
Symphony no 2 in C major, Op. 61 by Robert Schumann
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1845-1846; Germany 
Date of Recording: 10/31/1959 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 36 Minutes 20 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
11.
Symphony no 2 in C minor "Resurrection" by Gustav Mahler
Performer:  Hanni Mack-Cosack (Soprano), Hertha Töpper (Alto)
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra,  Stuttgart Bach Choir,  Stuttgart Southwest German Radio Vocal Ensemble
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1888/1896; Germany 
Date of Recording: 04/17/1958 
Venue:  Lieder Hall, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 79 Minutes 30 Secs. 
Language: German 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
12.
Symphony no 3 in D minor by Gustav Mahler
Performer:  Ruth Siewert (Mezzo Soprano)
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra,  Stuttgart Southwest German Radio Vocal Ensemble,  Eberhard Ludwig School Children's Choir
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1893-1896; Hamburg, Germany 
Date of Recording: 04/07/1960 
Venue:  Live  Liederhall, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 87 Minutes 42 Secs. 
Language: German 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
13.
Symphony no 2 in D major, Op. 73 by Johannes Brahms
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1877; Austria 
Date of Recording: 03/16/1966 
Venue:  Funkstudio, Villa Berg, Stuttgart 
Length: 41 Minutes 30 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
14.
German Requiem, Op. 45 by Johannes Brahms
Performer:  Maria Stader (Soprano), Hermann Prey (Baritone)
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra,  Hessian Radio Chorus Frankfurt,  Stuttgart Southwest German Radio Vocal Ensemble
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1854-1868; Austria 
Date of Recording: 11/07/1959 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 68 Minutes 12 Secs. 
Language: German 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
15.
Concerto for Violin no 1 in G minor, Op. 26 by Max Bruch
Performer:  Hansheinz Schneeberger (Violin)
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1868; Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/15/1960 
Venue:  Lieder Hall, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 25 Minutes 11 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
16.
Concerto for Violin in G major, Op. 22 by Hermann Goetz
Performer:  Roman Schimmer (Violin)
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1868; Germany 
Date of Recording: 04/10/1953 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 16 Minutes 39 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
17.
Symphony no 95 in C minor, H 1 no 95 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1791; London, England 
Date of Recording: 04/05/1955 
Venue:  Stuttgart-Degerloch, Waldheim 
Length: 19 Minutes 52 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
18.
Symphony no 100 in G major, H 1 no 100 "Military" by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1793-1794; London, England 
Date of Recording: 04/08/1958 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 22 Minutes 27 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
19.
Eine Alpensinfonie, Op. 64 by Richard Strauss
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1911-1915; Germany 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 45 Minutes 32 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording.
Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany (01/04/1955 - 01/07/1955) 
20.
Coriolan Overture in C minor, Op. 62: Allegro con brio by Ludwig van Beethoven
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1807; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 09/25/1952 
Venue:  Live  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 8 Minutes 7 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
21.
Song of Destiny, Op. 54 by Johannes Brahms
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra,  Stuttgart Southwest German Radio Vocal Ensemble
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1868-1871; Austria 
Date of Recording: 01/26/1954 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 15 Minutes 7 Secs. 
Language: German 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
22.
Nänie, Op. 82 by Johannes Brahms
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra,  Stuttgart Southwest German Radio Vocal Ensemble
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1880-1881; Austria 
Date of Recording: 01/25/1954 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 13 Minutes 22 Secs. 
Language: German 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
23.
Tristan und Isolde: Prelude and Liebestod by Richard Wagner
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1859; Germany 
Date of Recording: 04/29/1950 
Venue:  Stuttgart-Degerloch, Waldheim 
Length: 18 Minutes 18 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
24.
In Autumn Overture, Op. 11 by Edvard Grieg
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1866/1887; Norway 
Date of Recording: 12/02/1954 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 11 Minutes 21 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
25.
Richard III: Overture by Robert Volkmann
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: Budapest, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 09/12/1952 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 13 Minutes 23 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
26.
Concerto for Cello no 2 in D major, Op. 101/H 7b no 2 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Performer:  Enrico Mainardi (Cello)
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1783; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 11/05/1950 
Venue:  Live  Stuttgart-Degerloch, Waldheim 
Length: 27 Minutes 8 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
27.
Symphony no 38 in D major, K 504 "Prague" by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 07/04/1956 
Venue:  Live  Ludwigsburg, Germany 
Length: 23 Minutes 5 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
28.
No, che non sei capace, K 419 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Ruth Margaret Pütz (Soprano)
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1783; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 04/09/1959 
Venue:  Live  Lieder Hall, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 4 Minutes 23 Secs. 
Language: Italian 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
29.
Le nozze di Figaro, K 492: Porgi, amor, qualche ristoro by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Elisabeth Schwarzkopf (Soprano)
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 04/06/1959 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 4 Minutes 18 Secs. 
Language: Italian 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
30.
Die Zauberflöte, K 620: Dies Bildnis ist bezaubernd schön by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Fritz Wunderlich (Tenor)
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1791; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 04/12/1959 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 4 Minutes 15 Secs. 
Language: German 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
31.
Concerto for Piano no 9 in E flat major, K 271 "Jeunehomme" by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Clara Haskil (Piano)
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1777; Salzburg, Austria 
Date of Recording: 05/23/1952 
Venue:  Stuttgart-Degerloch, Waldheim 
Length: 30 Minutes 17 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
32.
Concerto for Piano no 19 in F major, K 459 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Clara Haskil (Piano)
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1784; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 07/04/1956 
Venue:  Live  Ludwigsburg Castle, Ludwigsburg, Germany 
Length: 27 Minutes 17 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
33.
Theme and Variations on a poem by Adelbert von Chamisso by E. Nikolaus von Reznicek
Performer:  Barry McDaniel (Baritone)
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1921; Prague 
Date of Recording: 02/12/1960 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 17 Minutes 17 Secs. 
Language: German 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
34.
Das Käthchen von Heilbronn, Op. 17: Overture by Hans Pfitzner
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1905; Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/20/1956 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 12 Minutes 26 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
35.
Variations and Fugue on a theme of Mozart, Op. 132 by Max Reger
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1914; Germany 
Date of Recording: 11/05/1950 
Venue:  Live  Stuttgart-Degerloch, Waldheim 
Length: 31 Minutes 45 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
36.
Manfred, Op. 115 by Robert Schumann
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1848-1849; Germany 
Venue:  Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 11 Minutes 22 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording.
Stuttgart, Germany (09/14/1960 - 09/15/1960) 
37.
Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage Overture, in D major Op. 27 by Felix Mendelssohn
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1828; Germany 
Date of Recording: 03/10/1961 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 12 Minutes 27 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
38.
Overture, Scherzo and Finale in E minor, Op. 52 by Robert Schumann
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/21/1954 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 16 Minutes 9 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording.
Composition written: Germany (1841).
Composition revised: 1845. 
39.
Hebrides Overture, in B minor Op. 26 "Fingal's Cave" by Felix Mendelssohn
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1829-1832; Rome, Italy 
Date of Recording: 01/04/1955 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 10 Minutes 6 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
40.
Midsummer Night's Dream Overture, in E major Op. 21 by Felix Mendelssohn
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1826; Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/26/1954 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 11 Minutes 16 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
41.
Midsummer Night's Dream, Op. 61: Nocturne by Felix Mendelssohn
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1842; Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/26/1954 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 5 Minutes 44 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
42.
Midsummer Night's Dream, Op. 61: Scherzo by Felix Mendelssohn
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1842; Germany 
Date of Recording: 01/26/1954 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 4 Minutes 46 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
43.
Parsifal: Act 1 Prelude by Richard Wagner
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1877-1882; Germany 
Date of Recording: 03/17/1966 
Venue:  Broadcast Hall no 2, Radio Studio, Stutt 
Length: 12 Minutes 31 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
44.
Tristan und Isolde: Act 1 Prelude by Richard Wagner
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1858; Germany 
Date of Recording: 04/29/1950 
Venue:  Stuttgart-Degerloch, Waldheim 
Length: 11 Minutes 27 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
45.
Götterdämmerung: Dawn and Siegfried's Rhine Journey by Richard Wagner
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1874; Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/28/1955 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 11 Minutes 10 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
46.
Götterdämmerung: Siegfried's Funeral Music by Richard Wagner
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1874; Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/28/1955 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 7 Minutes 12 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
47.
Siegfried Idyll by Richard Wagner
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1870; Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/28/1955 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 17 Minutes 20 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
48.
Parsifal: Good Friday Music by Richard Wagner
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1877-1882; Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/23/1954 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 9 Minutes 49 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording. 
49.
Parsifal: Finale by Richard Wagner
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1877-1882 
Venue:  Broadcast Hall no 2, Radio Studio, Stutt 
Length: 5 Minutes 30 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording.
Broadcast Hall no 2, Radio Studio, Stuttgart, Germany (03/17/1966 - 03/19/1966) 
50.
Symphony no 86 in D major, H 1 no 86 by Franz Joseph Haydn
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Eszterhazá, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 05/20/1954 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 25 Minutes 26 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
51.
Guntram, Op. 25: Prelude by Richard Strauss
Conductor:  Carl Schuricht
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1893/1934; Germany 
Venue:  Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany 
Length: 11 Minutes 16 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a mono recording.
Villa Berg Studio, Stuttgart, Germany (03/20/1956 - 03/23/1956) 

Sound Samples

Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92: I. Poco sostenuto - Vivace
Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92: II. Allegretto
Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92: III. Presto
Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92: IV. Allegro con brio
Symphony No. 2 in C major, Op. 61: I. Sostenuto assai - Allegro ma non troppo
Symphony No. 2 in C major, Op. 61: II. Scherzo, Allegro vivace
Symphony No. 2 in C major, Op. 61: III. Adagio espressivo
Symphony No. 2 in C major, Op. 61: IV. Allegro molto vivace
Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125, "Choral": I. Allegro ma non troppo, un poco maestoso
Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125, "Choral": II. Molto vivace
Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125, "Choral": III. Adagio molto e cantabile - Andante moderato
Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125, "Choral": IV. Finale: Presto - Allegro assai
Overture to Collin's Coriolan, Op. 62, "Coriolan Overture"

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