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Kozeluch: Complete Keyboard Sonatas Vol 3 / Kemp English

Kozeluch
Release Date: 06/10/2014 
Label:  Grand Piano   Catalog #: 644   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Leopold Anton Kozeluch
Performer:  Kemp English
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews

Mozart’s esteemed contemporary and rival, Leopold Koželuch, was an early champion of the fortepiano. His keyboard sonatas are a treasure trove of late 18th-century Viennese style, representing perfection of form and foreshadowing Beethoven and Schubert. Kemp English, one of New Zealand’s leading artists, performs on copies of 1795 fortepianos and original instruments from the 18th and early 19th centuries, bringing the entire cycle of Koželuch’s 50 keyboard sonatas to life for the first time in a recorded format. Mozart’s esteemed contemporary and rival, Leopold Koželuch, was an early champion of the fortepiano. His keyboard sonatas are a treasure trove of late 18th-century Viennese style, representing perfection of form and foreshadowing Beethoven and Schubert. Kemp English, one of New Zealand’s leading artists, performs on copies of 1795 fortepianos and original instruments from the 18th and early 19th centuries, bringing the entire cycle of Koželuch’s 50 keyboard sonatas to life for the first time in a recorded format. Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Sonata for Piano in C major, Op. 8 no 1 by Leopold Anton Kozeluch
Performer:  Kemp English (Fortepiano)
Period: Classical 
2.
Sonata for Piano in F major, Op. 8 no 2 by Leopold Anton Kozeluch
Performer:  Kemp English (Fortepiano)
Period: Classical 
3.
Sonata for Piano in E flat major, Op. 10 no 1 by Leopold Anton Kozeluch
Performer:  Kemp English (Fortepiano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1784 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 Third Time's the Charm March 1, 2015 By Peter K. (Fort Collins, CO) See All My Reviews "Okay, I wasn't impressed with the first volume of sonatas, was much more impressed with the second, and now I'm completely won over by the third. Kozeluch is distinctive, and I guess I've had to get used to his sound world, especially with the fortepiano. It will be a monument to get all 50 sonatas presented as he might have meant them to be heard. Then, hopefully, pianists--especially amateurs like myself--will be able to translate them to the modern piano with something of the appropriate style. I have now read through several from Volume 1 of Baerenreiter's new complete edition, and as the editor notes, they "fall under the hand" easily and are immensely enjoyable to play. If you love 18th century keyboard music, treat yourself to all these CDs. Much pleasurable listening here." Report Abuse
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