WGBH Radio WGBH Radio theclassicalstation.org

Leopold Stokowski And The Philadelphia Orchestra


Release Date: 02/28/2006 
Label:  Music & Arts Programs Of America Catalog #: 1173   Spars Code: n/a 
Composer:  Antonio VivaldiGiovanni PalestrinaGirolamo FrescobaldiJean-Baptiste Lully,   ... 
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Number of Discs: 4 
Recorded in: Mono 
Length: 4 Hours 43 Mins. 

In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews

Although one might have thought that nearly everything had been reissued in the digital format by now, it turns out that there were four CDs worth of Stokowski/Philadelphia Orchestra material that had still not appeared on compact discs. Unless previously unissued recordings turn up, this completes the job of reissuing Stokowski’s Philadelphia 78s on CD. First of all, I must say that I doubt that any of the recordings sounded this good when they were available. For one thing, while even a specialist like Mark Obert-Thorne, who did the digital transfers, can’t make old 78s better than they actually were, he can get more out of them than seemed to be there on the playback equipment of 60 and 70 years ago. In a few cases, a sow’s ear remains a Read more sow’s ear, but some of what emerges from these CDs is remarkably vivid, and many of the performances can still engage us despite the lower frequency response and the soft hiss of the original surfaces, which quickly seems to disappear (at least in most cases).

Before getting to the performances, let me point out that Richard Freed’s annotations, packed with information but very readable, are a model of how such a project should be handled. Most of the tidbits of discographic trivia scattered through this review did not originate with me—they came from Freed’s annotations, which acknowledge his debt to the discographic and Stokowski expertise of Obert-Thorne and Edward Johnson. One of the things the notes indicate is that, as Stokowski aged, his approach to Baroque music sometimes acknowledged the validity of early-music performance practice, using faster tempos and smaller ensembles, or even the original orchestration, assuming that there was one available. This did not stop him from transcribing chamber, keyboard, and vocal music for the orchestra, often to excellent effect. If you must have modern sound, it should be pointed out that Matthias Bamert, Wolfgang Sawallisch, and Stokowski himself made later recordings of many of his transcriptions, but the ones on this set are closer to the source, so to speak, and sometimes seem to transcend the sonic limitations of their time. The set starts out with his own version of Vivaldi’s Concerto grosso in D Minor from L’estro armonico, scored for full string section, triple winds, five horns, four trumpets and trombones, two tubas, tam-tam, harp, and timpani! Perhaps a shade slow by contemporary standards, it was a guilty pleasure for me and, possibly, for the conductor—in 1967, he recorded an authentically scored edition of the same piece. The recordings of the Frescobaldi Gagliarda and Palestrina’s Adoramus Te date from 1934. Stokowski recorded his beautiful transcriptions again in 1952 (with “His” Symphony Orchestra) and may have even improved upon his Philadelphia performances when he did them yet again, this time in 1958 with the Symphony of the Air. The Lully suite is a group of pieces from Le triumph de l’Amour, Alceste, and Thesée, based on Felix Mottl’s suite, but shortened and re-orchestrated by Stokowski.

Handel’s Overture in D Minor is the same piece that was orchestrated by Sir Edward Elgar and Hans Kindler; Stokowski’s edition is more “stringy” than theirs, but all three are effective and sufficiently different from each other to be worth exploring. Kindler’s transcription is closer to Stokowski’s than it is to Elgar’s, and I wonder if his service as a cellist in the Philadelphia Orchestra (1914–1920) had anything to do with it. Kindler eventually founded the National Symphony Orchestra and was its first conductor. Irrelevant piece of trivia: Kindler’s successor in Washington, Howard Mitchell, was also eventually invited to become the Philadelphia Orchestra’s principal cellist but turned down the job because of his conducting ambitions. Stokowski’s arrangement of the “Pastoral Symphony” from Handel’s Messiah was recorded several times; this 1930 version is the second of three. In 1966, as part of an LP of excerpts from the oratorio, he recorded Handel’s version. Stokowski made two recordings of excerpts from the Water Music. Like several of the recordings on this CD, the first one (1934) was made, not in the Academy of Music but in Trinity Church in Camden where Victor had recording studios. “Based on” Sir Hamilton Harty’s once-popular selection of movements, it is a disappointingly plodding performance, especially in the opening Allegro. He did better in 1961, using a few extra movements and quite a few extra instruments, including, oddly, a harpsichord. This later performance (by the “RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra”) is livelier and more flamboyant (but I still think the opening Allegro is too slow). The flip side of the LP contained an equally large-scaled Royal Fireworks Music complete with real fireworks sound effects at the end, an effect preserved on the RCA Victor CD reissue.

With a total of eight recordings of the Firebird Suite, four with the Philadelphia Orchestra, I think Stokowski holds the record for most recordings of the same piece. If you count the soundtrack of “Fantasia,” he also made eight recordings of his celebrated arrangement of Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D Minor. The first two, with the Philadelphia Orchestra, were done in 1927 and 1934. The 1934 recording, a product of Victor’s Camden studio, makes its first CD appearance. Mr. Freed’s annotations point out that the second 78 side had a smaller-than-usual label so that more space could be given to the music due to the recording’s amplitude. The other transcriptions on the set are those of the Passacaglia and Fugue in C Minor, Ich ruf zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ, BWV 639, and “Es ist Vollbracht” from the St. John Passion. Stokowski’s transcription of “A Mighty Fortress is our God,” though labeled as being from the Cantata No. 80, is actually a transcription of the original chorale. Freed indicates that this is the second of three different Stokowski versions of the piece; the last and most elaborate one was never recorded. He actually recorded 29 of his Bach transcriptions with the orchestra; if they are all you are interested in, Pearl collected them on one two-CD set (the performances on this Music and Arts set are, of course, not included by Pearl). Although I own some of the other versions of his Bach arrangements, what would be the point of comparing them with each other? Either you respond to Stokowski’s dramatic, sensuous approach to the music or you don’t.

Filling out the CD of the Bach pieces are 78 discmates, the famous Boccherini Minuet and the “Haydn” Serenade from the String Quartet, op. 3/5, probably composed by one Roman Hoffstetter as a Haydn imitation, and a very successful one. Both were recorded in May 1929 at the Academy of Music. Many people know that Victor made a pioneering effort at manufacturing LPs but that an early 1930s effort was foiled by the depression and the technological limitations of the time. One of the few LPs that were issued contained Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, recorded in July 1931. The performance was never issued on 78s. Several months later, Bell Labs recorded portions of a live Beethoven Fifth at two concerts and it was discovered that, between them, a complete performance could be assembled. It was issued as part of a multi-CD set (mostly old broadcasts) to celebrate the orchestra’s centennial that is well worth investigating (as of this writing, it is still available from the orchestra’s gift shop). In a sense, the LP performance is “live,” too, since there was no such thing as recording tape in 1931 and a serious, obvious mistake would have required the performers to start all over again. The LP, issued on a disc made of something called “Vitrolac,” is somewhat noisy, but quieter than the Bell Labs test records, and the performances are nearly identical. Listeners who have grown up on more “authentic” performance practices may be scandalized by Stokowski’s more free-wheeling approach to the music, beginning with a drawn-out, dramatic emphasis of the “fate” motif that begins the piece (the rhythm coincides with the Morse Code symbol for the letter “V” (for “victory”), a fact which got considerable play during World War II, and an “Andante con moto” that has less “moto” and more Romantic juice than usual. Personally, I love it, but the musicologically more righteous should consider themselves warned. There are a few smudged details (a recording problem) in the brass and winds that probably would have been cleared up at an orthodox 78 session.

His 1929 recording of the Franck Symphony in D Minor features a similar and obvious personal vision of the music with rubato and portamento generously applied. They don’t make ’em like this anymore. The original set, like several early Victor ones, included a side that contained an outline of themes from the symphony, played on the piano (unbilled, if I recall correctly) by Artur Rodzinski before he became Artur Rodzinski, so to speak. It’s included here. Stokowski’s pithy remarks, replete with his phony accent, don’t even qualify as Music Appreciation 101 but, if they tell us little about the music, they do give an insight into his approach to it (“This might be called ‘the symphony of the mystical and dream world’”). The original 78s used for this transfer may have been pressed slightly off-center because, in addition to smudged details, the sound is marred by brief little swells of volume characteristic of such discs. Admirers of his way with this music have a better-sounding 1935 Philadelphia recording and an even clearer 1970 version with the Netherlands Radio Orchestra to choose from.

Those who prefer their Debussy on the dry side (so do I, if it’s done by, say, Ansermet or Boulez) may find Stokowski’s fairly slow “Nuages” (quite misty and effective—the subdued 1929 recording seems to be an asset) and his sensuous, possibly overripe, Afternoon of a Faun (gorgeous sound—one of his last Philadelphia 78s) not to their taste. Unfortunately, a vague 1927 recording is not an asset to his lively “Fêtes,” but the sharp, detached articulation in the processional is a wonderful touch that I wish other maestros, including Stokowski, had followed up on. In 1937, he recorded these two Nocturnes again and they were eventually coupled in a 78 set with the third Nocturne, “Sirènes,” which was recorded in 1939. He made subsequent recordings of all three Nocturnes in 1950 with “His” Symphony Orchestra and 1957, in stereo, with the London Symphony Orchestra. Also on the third CD in this set is his sensuous, dreamy take on Clair de lune. This orchestration was subsequently recorded by him three more times—actually four, if you count one that was recorded for Fantasia but eventually cut from the movie. Freed says this has turned up on a Disney DVD which I’d love to see, as well as hear.

Stokowski made an acoustical recording of an abridged version of Felix Weingartner’s arrangement of Weber’s Invitation to the Dance. His subsequent four recordings, all of them mono (plus a live one made by Bell Labs), reverted to the more familiar Berlioz orchestration, as slightly modified by Stokowski (for example, the opening cello solo is played by the whole section). It’s a perfectly good performance, and this 1927 78-rpm was the first of his electrical ones. Irrelevant piece of trivia: Benny Goodman used the gently swaying central section of Invitation as the source of his theme song, “Let’s Dance.” For some reason, Stokowski’s 1931 recording of the Brahms Fourth Symphony was planned for release on seven 10-inch 78s. I share Freed’s bewilderment at why Victor would have deliberately created unnecessary side breaks, but it appears that saner heads prevailed and, even though the 10-inchers were assigned catalog numbers, they were never actually issued until Nieman-Marcus put them out on a special historical LP set of previously unreleased recordings. Victor did a more orthodox 12-inch remake in 1933 and that one was issued—a good thing, since the original 10-inch side-one matrix is missing and, as on the Nieman-Marcus set, part of the later recording had to be substituted. As he did with all the Brahms symphonies, Stokowski made several later recordings that surpassed his Philadelphia efforts only sonically. At the risk of being consigned to old fogeydom, I think his Philadelphia Brahms symphonies are, on the whole, as good as anybody’s—but not his perverse notion of the Hungarian Dance No. 1, taken at an oddly slow tempo and further diminished by a Stokowski re-orchestration that is certainly no improvement on the original (and this is one of the few dances that Brahms actually orchestrated). Stokowski must have liked the piece, for Freed points out the odd fact that, although he recorded Nos. 5 and 6 way back in 1917, he never re-recorded them but did No. 1 six times (two were never issued)!

Although he makes what were probably thought to be “necessary” cuts in 1939, Stokowski and the Philadelphia Orchestra deliver quite sympathetic accounts of The Blue Danube and Tales from the Vienna Woods (perhaps he does toy with Tales too much). Years later, when advanced recording techniques made it more practical to do so, he recorded complete, uncut performances of these waltzes, but the Philadelphia 78s, for what they are, are quite special and make their bestseller status understandable. Stokowski was an outstanding exponent of music by the other famous and unrelated Strauss. He made several recordings, including a shortened acoustical one, of the Dance of the Seven Veils. Obviously, the music—decadently voluptuous as well as brilliantly scored, is right up his alley. I can’t say what Victor did back in 1929 at the Academy of Music or what Obert-Thorne did with the digital transfer but, whatever it was, the sound is amazingly rich and detailed. I’ve never heard the conductor’s 1937 re-make, but how could it improve on this? Irrelevant piece of trivia: Morton Gould made a clever arrangement of Nacio Herb Brown’s “Temptation” for RCA Victor, using the Dance’s “dum-dum-dum dadadum” rhythmic pattern as a background to the tune.

Among the many tidbits of information that I was previously unaware of is the revelation that Stokowski once played the tuba and had a love for the sound of brass instruments. Although he organized a super-band of 120 players that included members of the Philadelphia Orchestra, his 1929 recordings of Sousa’s El Capitan and The Stars and Stripes Forever are performed in standard symphony orchestra arrangements. I wonder if Sousa, who was still alive at the time, ever heard them and what he would have thought of them if he had. They are straightforward and vigorous performances and, like virtually everything on this interesting set, offer playing and recorded sound that usually matched the highest standards of the era.

FANFARE: James Miller
Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Concerto for 2 Violins and Cello in D minor, Op. 3 no 11/RV 565 by Antonio Vivaldi
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1711; Venice, Italy 
Date of Recording: 1934 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
2.
Adoramus te Christe by Giovanni Palestrina
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Renaissance 
Written: by 1581; Italy 
Date of Recording: 1934 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
3.
Gagliarda by Girolamo Frescobaldi
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1627; Italy 
Date of Recording: 1934 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
4.
Le triomphe de l'amour, LWV 59: Prélude de la nuit by Jean-Baptiste Lully
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1681; France 
Date of Recording: 1930 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
5.
Alceste, LWV 50: Overture by Jean-Baptiste Lully
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1673; Paris, France 
Date of Recording: 1930 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
6.
Thésée, LWV 51: Overture by Jean-Baptiste Lully
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1675; Paris, France 
Date of Recording: 1930 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
7.
Pavan and Gigue by William Byrd
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Renaissance 
Written: England 
Date of Recording: 1937 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
8.
Chandos Anthems: no 2, HWV 247 - Overture in D minor by George Frideric Handel
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1717-1718; London, England 
Date of Recording: 1935 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
9.
Messiah, HWV 56: Pastoral Symphony "Pifa" by George Frideric Handel
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1742; London, England 
Date of Recording: 1930 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
10.
Water Music, HWV 348-350: Suite by George Frideric Handel
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: circa 1715-1717; London, England 
Date of Recording: 1934 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
11.
Orgelbüchlein: Ich ruf'zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ, BWV 639 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: circa 1713-1717; Weimar, Germany 
Date of Recording: 1934 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
12.
Saint John Passion, BWV 245: no 58, Es ist vollbracht by Johann Sebastian Bach
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1724; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 1934 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
13.
Quintet for 2 Violins, Viola and 2 Cellos in A major, Op. 13 no 5/G 281 by Luigi Boccherini
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1772; Spain 
Date of Recording: 1929 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
14.
Quartets (6) for Strings, Op. 3: no 5 in F major - Andante cantabile "Serenade" by Roman Hoffstetter
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: by 1777; Germany 
Date of Recording: 1929 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski.
This work was previously attributed to Franz Joseph Haydn. 
15.
Symphony no 5 in C minor, Op. 67 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Classical 
Written: 1807-1808; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 1931 
16.
Symphony in D minor, M 48 by César Franck
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1886-1888; France 
Date of Recording: 1927 
17.
Suite bergamasque: 3rd movement, Clair de Lune by Claude Debussy
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1890/1905; France 
Date of Recording: 1937 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
18.
Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune by Claude Debussy
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1892-1894; France 
Date of Recording: 1940 
Notes: Composition written: France (1892 - 1894). 
19.
Symphony no 4 in E minor, Op. 98 by Johannes Brahms
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1884-1885; Austria 
Date of Recording: 1931 
20.
An der schönen, blauen Donau, Op. 314 by Johann Strauss Jr.
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1867; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 1939 
21.
Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald, Op. 325 by Johann Strauss Jr.
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1868; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 1939 
22.
Salome, Op. 54: Dance of the seven veils by Richard Strauss
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1903-1905; Germany 
Date of Recording: 1929 
23.
El Capitan (march) by John Philip Sousa
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1896; USA 
Date of Recording: 1929 
24.
Stars and Stripes Forever by John Philip Sousa
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1897; USA 
Date of Recording: 1929 
25.
Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott, BWV 80: Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott by Johann Sebastian Bach
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1744; Leipzig, Germany 
Date of Recording: 1933 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
26.
Nocturnes (3) for Orchestra: no 1, Nuages by Claude Debussy
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1897-1899; France 
Notes: 09/27/1928; 05/02/1929 
27.
Nocturnes (3) for Orchestra: no 2, Fêtes by Claude Debussy
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: French Impressionist 
Date of Recording: 10/11/1927 
28.
Hungarian Dances (10) for Piano solo: no 1 in G minor by Johannes Brahms
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: by 1872; Austria 
Date of Recording: 1934 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
29.
Invitation to the Dance, in D flat major J 260/Op. 65 by Carl Maria von Weber
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1819; Dresden, Germany 
Date of Recording: 1937 
Notes: Arrangers: Hector Berlioz; Leopold Stokowski. 
30.
Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: by 1708; Germany 
Date of Recording: 1934 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 
31.
Passacaglia in C minor, BWV 582 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Conductor:  Leopold Stokowski
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Philadelphia Orchestra
Period: Baroque 
Written: circa 1708-1712; Arnstadt, Germany 
Date of Recording: 1929 
Notes: Arranger: Leopold Stokowski. 

Sound Samples

Concerto Grosso in D minor, Op. 3, No. 11, RV 565 (arr. L. Stokowski): I. Allegro
Concerto Grosso in D minor, Op. 3, No. 11, RV 565 (arr. L. Stokowski): II. Intermezzo
Concerto Grosso in D minor, Op. 3, No. 11, RV 565 (arr. L. Stokowski): III. Allegro
Adoramus te Christe (arr. L. Stokowski)
Gagliarda (arr. L. Stokowski)
Le triomphe de l'amour: Nocturne (arr. L. Stokowski)
Alceste: Prelude (arr. L. Stokowski)
Thesee: March (arr. L. Stokowski)
Pavane and Gigue (arr. L. Stokowski)
In the Lord put I my trust, HWV 247, "Chandos Anthem No. 2": I. Overture (arr. L. Stokowski): In the Lord put I my trust, HWV 247, "Chandos Anthem No. 2": I. Overture (arr. by L. Stokowski)
Messiah, HWV 56, Part I: Pastoral Symphony, "Pifa" (arr. L. Stokowski)
Water Music: Suite No. 1 in F major, HWV 348 (arr. L. Stokowski): III. Allegro
Water Music: Suite No. 1 in F major, HWV 348 (arr. L. Stokowski): VI. Air
Water Music: Suite No. 1 in F major, HWV 348 (arr. L. Stokowski): VIII. Bourree
Water Music: Suite No. 1 in F major, HWV 348 (arr. L. Stokowski): IX. Hornpipe
Water Music: Suite No. 1 in F major, HWV 348 (arr. L. Stokowski): IV. Andante
Water Music: Suite No. 1 in F major, HWV 348 (arr. L. Stokowski): X. Allegro deciso
Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565 (arr. L. Stokowski)
Das Orgelbuchlein, BWV 599-644 (arr. L. Stokowski): Das Orgel-Buchlein: Ich ruf' zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ, BWV 639 (arr. L. Stokowski)
St. John Passion, BWV 245, Part II: Aria: Es ist vollbracht! (arr. L. Stokowski): St. John Passion, BWV 245: Aria: Es ist vollbracht! (arr. L. Stokowski)
Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott, BWV 80 (arr. L. Stokowski): Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott, BWV 80: Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott (arr. L. Stokowski)
Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor, BWV 582 (arr. L. Stokowski)
String Quintet in E major, Op. 11, No. 5, G. 275: III. Minuetto (arr. L. Stokowski): String Quintet in E major, Op. 11, No. 5, G. 275: Minuet (arr. L. Stokowski)
String Quartet in F major, Op. 3, No. 5, Hob.III:17, "Serenade": II. Serenade: Andante cantabile (attrib. to Hoffstetter) (arr. L. Stokowski): String Quartet in F major, Op. 3, No. 5, Hob.III:17, "Serenade" (attrib. to Hoffstetter) (arr. L. Stokowski)
Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67: I. Allegro con brio
Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67: II. Andante con moto
Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67: III. Allegro
Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67: IV. Allegro

Customer Reviews

Be the first to review this title
Review This Title
Review This Title Share on Facebook




YOU MUST BE A SUBSCRIBER TO LISTEN TO ARKIVMUSIC STREAMING.
TRY IT NOW FOR FREE!
Sign up now for two weeks of free access to the world's best classical music collection. Keep listening for only $19.95/month - thousands of classical albums for the price of one! Learn more about ArkivMusic Streaming
Aleady a subscriber? Sign In