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Respighi: The Birds; Three Botticelli Pictures; Suite In G Major / Di Vittorio, Chamber Orchestra Of New York

Respighi
Release Date: 05/27/2014 
Label:  Naxos   Catalog #: 573168   Spars Code: DDD 
Composer:  Ottorino Respighi
Conductor:  Salvatore Di Vittorio
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Chamber Orchestra Of New York
Number of Discs: 1 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

One of Respighi’s masterpieces, Gli uccelli (The Birds) includes transcriptions of birdsong and music of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in writing of evocative, captivating lyricism. Trittico botticelliano, an illustration of three paintings by Botticelli, employs dance rhythms, modal melodies and a variant of the medieval hymn Veni, Veni Emmanuel in deft, often sublime fashion. The Suite in G major, cast for strings and organ in the form of a Concerto grosso, is heard on this première recording in its original edition. One of Respighi’s masterpieces, Gli uccelli (The Birds) includes transcriptions of birdsong and music of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in writing of evocative, captivating lyricism. Trittico botticelliano, an illustration of three paintings by Botticelli, employs dance rhythms, modal melodies and a variant of the medieval hymn Veni, Veni Emmanuel in deft, often sublime fashion. The Suite in G major, cast for strings and organ in the form of a Concerto grosso, is heard on this première recording in its original edition. Read less

Works on This Recording

1. Trittico botticelliano by Ottorino Respighi
Conductor:  Salvatore Di Vittorio
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Chamber Orchestra Of New York
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1927; Rome, Italy 
2. Suite for Strings and Organ in G major by Ottorino Respighi
Conductor:  Salvatore Di Vittorio
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Chamber Orchestra Of New York
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1902-1905; Rome, Italy 
3. Gli uccelli "The Birds" by Ottorino Respighi
Conductor:  Salvatore Di Vittorio
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Chamber Orchestra Of New York
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1927; Rome, Italy 

Sound Samples

Serenata, P. 54
Trittico botticelliano, P. 151: I. La Primavera: Allegro vivace
Trittico botticelliano, P. 151: II. L'adorazione dei Magi: Andante lento
Trittico botticelliano, P. 151: III. La nascita di Venere: Allegro moderato
Gli uccelli (The Birds), P. 154: I. Preludio: Allegro moderato
Gli uccelli (The Birds), P. 154: II. La colomba: Andante expressivo
Gli uccelli (The Birds), P. 154: III. La gallina: Allegro vivace
Gli uccelli (The Birds), P. 154: IV. L'usignuolo: Andante mosso
Gli uccelli (The Birds), P. 154: V. Il cucu: Allegro
Suite in G Major, P. 58 (Original Version): I. Preludio: Moderato
Suite in G Major, P. 58 (Original Version): II. Aria: Lento
Suite in G Major, P. 58 (Original Version): III. Pastorale: Andante molto sostenuto
Suite in G Major, P. 58 (Original Version): IV. Cantico: Grave

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 Masterful interpretations June 2, 2014 By Ralph Graves (Hood, VA) See All My Reviews "Ottorino Respighi is known for his brilliant orchestrations -- but for most listeners, that knowledge is based on his Roman trilogy of tone poems. Salvatore Di Vittorio and the Chamber Orchestra of New York dig a little deeper into the composer's catalog. Their discoveries reaffirm Respighi's reputation, while providing an enjoyable listening experience. The Suite in G for strings and organ is an early work, yet Respighi's genius for orchestration is already in place. This would be an excellent companion piece to Saint-Saen's Third Symphony, although Respighi's neo-classical work might sound a little understated in comparison. Gli uccelli (The Birds), like Respighi's more famous tone poems, show the composer's skill at painting with music. Respighi incorporates bird calls into the music, but in this performance their recognizable, but not overdone. Rather, the calls were fully integrated into the music presenting impressions -- rather than literal interpretations of -- the birds depicted in each movement. The Trittico botticelliano is (in my opinion) the strongest work on the album. Maestro di Vittorio and his ensemble deliver a spirited performance of "Spring," the first movement. "The Adoration of the Magi," the middle movement is played with sensitivity and delicacy, and the finale, "The Birth of Venus" fairly shimmers in places. The chamber orchestra is a group of young players, and sometimes that shows. Sometimes the strings lacked precision in more active passages, and there seemed to my ears to be some slight intonation problems in the Seranata. Still, they play with a very rich and warm sound, which is especially gorgeous in the slow movements. Performing these works with a chamber -- rather than full -- orchestra gives the music a feeling of transparency. It was a sound that seemed perfectly suited to these works." Report Abuse
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