WGBH Radio WGBH Radio theclassicalstation.org

Schoenberg: Verklarte Nacht, String Trio / Ma, Trampler, Juilliard Quartet


Release Date: 04/22/2014 
Label:  Sony   Catalog #: 55853  
Composer:  Arnold Schoenberg
Performer:  Walter TramplerRobert MannYo-Yo MaSamuel Rhodes,   ... 
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Juilliard String Quartet
Number of Discs: 1 
Recorded in: Stereo 
Low Stock: Currently 3 or fewer in stock. Usually ships in 24 hours, unless stock becomes depleted.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews

Coupling the 1899 Verklärte Nacht with the 1946 String Trio – a late 12-note work – raises the possibility of special pleading: buy the disc for Schoenberg’s reassuringly familiar Romantic composition, and you might be converted to the more difficult one too. As a marketing strategy, that seems reasonable; both performances here could persuade a variety of listeners. You’d expect a big-gestured, strongly characterised reading with Walter Trampler and Yo-Yo Ma augmenting the Juilliard Quartet in Verklärte Nacht; and though these players sometimes take a larger-than-life approach to the score’s dynamic markings, the results never struck me as inappropriate. This 1991 performance is real chamber music; if the case notes hadn’t Read more revealed that Trampler and Ma play second viola and second cello respectively, I wouldn’t have been sure who were the guests. Like many leading string players, at least one musician adds some irritating breathing noises to the quite close-miked recording. The 1985 recording of the trio benefits from the continuing vitality and real musicality, as well as experience, of three of the Juilliard Quartet’s members. There is much to enjoy as well as simply admire here.

-- Keith Potter, BBC Music Magazine Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Verklärte Nacht for String Sextet, Op. 4 by Arnold Schoenberg
Performer:  Walter Trampler (Viola), Robert Mann (Violin), Yo-Yo Ma (Cello),
Samuel Rhodes (Viola), Joel Smirnoff (Violin), Joel Krosnick (Cello)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Juilliard String Quartet
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1899; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 04/1991 
Venue:  Academy of Arts and Letters, NYC 
Length: 28 Minutes 20 Secs. 
2.
Trio for Violin, Viola and Cello, Op. 45 by Arnold Schoenberg
Performer:  Robert Mann (Violin), Samuel Rhodes (Viola), Joel Krosnick (Cello)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Juilliard String Quartet
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1946; USA 
Date of Recording: 05/21/1985 
Venue:  Sommer Center Chapel, Bronxville, NY 
Length: 19 Minutes 20 Secs. 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 Definitive recording for each! October 19, 2017 By Eric Koenig (Kalamazoo, MI) See All My Reviews "Verklärte Nacht Op. 4, written in 1899, and the String Trio Op. 45, written in 1946, virtually "bookend" Schoenberg's chamber music output. Each is an expressionistic masterpiece and the decision to record the two together was an inspired one. In the extremely conservative Vienna of the day, Verklärte Nacht caused fist fights at its premiere (one wonders if this was so much over the unwritten rule that one should never write program music for chamber ensemble, as was claimed, as it may have been over the subject matter of Richard Dehmel's poem from which Schoenberg drew inspiration). Of course it eventually settled into the mainstream repertory but back then critics were wont to say that it looked as though someone had smudged the score of Tristan und Isolde while the ink was still wet. Wagner had been dead only 16 years, Bruckner only 3 and Brahms only 2 at the time. Eduard Hanslick still reigned supreme. One must think back to what it must have been like back then; a performance of this was a very dicey affair. Eventually Schoenberg made a version, in 1917, for string orchestra; he made a revised one in 1943, which, because of its careful attention to bowings, tempo markings and the like, is a very important score for players of the sextet, as performed here. And in 1946 Schoenberg did the impossible: he set his own death to music. Mahler, in his Ninth Symphony, and Berg, in his Violin Concerto, had prefigured their deaths in music. However, one night in 1946, Schoenberg had a heart attack and was briefly pronounced clinically dead before being revived by intracardial injections. He had not made much progress after the commissioning of the Trio but suddenly fell to work following his recovery with a vengeance. The music describes the whole nightmarish affair: the tremors, the injections, and the like. The Juilliard Quartet, joined by violist Walter Trampler and cellist Yo-Yo Ma, deliver superb performances of both works. Definitive readings and must-haves for every serious collector of Schoenberg's music." Report Abuse
Review This Title