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Vladimir Horowitz - Three Classic Albums


Release Date: 02/25/2014 
Label:  Deutsche Grammophon   Catalog #: 001999602  
Composer:  Robert SchumannDomenico ScarlattiFranz LisztAlexander Scriabin,   ... 
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz
Number of Discs: 3 
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Notes and Editorial Reviews

Vladimir Horowitz
Five months after wrapping up The Last Romantic, Vladimir Horowitz decided to make his first studio recording since the 1970s. It finds the pianist more “settled in,” so to speak, on more relaxed yet, at the same time, more daring form. You can hear this throughout Schumann’s Kreisleriana, which has mellowed and ripened since Horowitz first recorded it in 1968. Inner voices gently emerge from nowhere, while the composer’s arching cantilenas take on new colors and shadings. However, the accents still startle, the bass notes ring purposefully, and the knotty virtuosic passages retain their flair and bite. Horowitz starts Scriabin’s D sharp minor Etude more quietly than in his previous recordings, and cannily reserves
Read more his febrile power for the final climax. When New York Times critic Donal Henahan wrote that Horowitz’s Scarlatti “has long been the despair of other pianists and the delight of audiences,” he could have been describing this recital’s two elegantly dispatched sonatas. And another American critic, Harris Goldsmith – one who did not admire Horowitz unreservedly – claimed that the present recording of Schubert’s B flat Impromptu “serves the music better than do many more ‘orthodox’ readings,” citing the “darting, hummingbirdlike whimsy of the G flat variation” and the “perfect left-hand delineation of the final one.”

Horowitz In Moscow
In a career filled with significant peaks and landmarks, Vladimir Horowitz’s return to Russia in 1986 for the first time in 61 years may have been the high point. It felt like home, and, as the pianist told his biographer, critic Harold C. Schonberg, “at home everybody loves you.” Horowitz may have been an American citizen, yet the Moscow and Leningrad audiences knew very well that the most influential Russian pianist of his era was back, and they understood what he represented. “Some of us pianists are good technicians, some of us are good musicians, but very few have this magical touch where the sound is floating. He had it as probably nobody else,” observed pianist Vladimir Feltsman, who was in the audience at the 20 April Moscow concert, which the American CBS network claimed to be the first full-length piano recital televised live. Although the CD does not contain the entire program, the event’s communicative essence resonates nonetheless. Horowitz restores the Mozart K 330 Sonata’s first movement exposition repeat omitted on The Last Romantic, and he adds new dimensions to old standbys like the two Chopin Mazurkas, Liszt’s Sonetto 104 del Petrarca, Moszkowski’s E?tincelles and Rachmaninov’s Polka de W.R.

Horowitz At Home
"DG's 'Horowitz at home,' the last recording to be issued, is a timely reminder of the more lyrical side of his genius with much of the repose that for so long eluded him." - Gramophone Magazine [October 2012] Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Kreisleriana, Op. 16 by Robert Schumann
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1838; Germany 
2.
Sonata for Harpsichord in B minor, K 87/L 33 by Domenico Scarlatti
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 18th Century 
3.
Impromptu for Piano in F sharp major, S 191 "Nocturne" by Franz Liszt
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1872; Rome, Italy 
4.
Etudes (12) for Piano, Op. 8: no 12 in D sharp minor by Alexander Scriabin
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1894; Russia 
5.
Impromptus (4) for Piano, D 935/Op. 142: no 3 in B flat major by Franz Schubert
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1827; Vienna, Austria 
6.
Military Marches (3) for Piano 4 hands, D 733/Op. 51: no 3 in E flat major by Franz Schubert
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1818; Vienna, Austria 
7.
Valses oubliées (4) for Piano, S 215: no 1 in F sharp major by Franz Liszt
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1881; Rome, Italy 
8.
Sonata for Harpsichord in E major, K 135/L 224 by Domenico Scarlatti
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 18th Century 
9.
Sonata for Harpsichord in E major, K 380/L 23 by Domenico Scarlatti
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 18th Century 
Date of Recording: 04/1986 
Venue:  Live  Great Hall, Tchaikovsky Consv, Moscow 
Length: 4 Minutes 0 Secs. 
10.
Sonata for Piano no 10 in C major, K 330 (300h) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1781-1783 
Date of Recording: 04/1986 
Venue:  Live  Great Hall, Tchaikovsky Consv, Moscow 
Length: 17 Minutes 0 Secs. 
11.
Preludes (13) for Piano, Op. 32: no 5 in G major, Moderato by Sergei Rachmaninov
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1910; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1986 
Venue:  Live  Great Hall, Tchaikovsky Consv, Moscow 
Length: 2 Minutes 49 Secs. 
12.
Preludes (13) for Piano, Op. 32: no 12 in G sharp minor, Allegro by Sergei Rachmaninov
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1910; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1986 
Venue:  Live  Great Hall, Tchaikovsky Consv, Moscow 
Length: 2 Minutes 33 Secs. 
13.
Etudes (12) for Piano, Op. 8: no 12 in D sharp minor by Alexander Scriabin
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1894; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1986 
Venue:  Live  Great Hall, Tchaikovsky Consv, Moscow 
Length: 2 Minutes 9 Secs. 
14.
Pieces (3) for Piano, Op. 2: no 1, Etude in C sharp minor by Alexander Scriabin
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1887-1889; Russia 
Date of Recording: 04/1986 
Venue:  Live  Great Hall, Tchaikovsky Consv, Moscow 
Length: 2 Minutes 39 Secs. 
15.
Années de pèlerinage, deuxième année, S 161 "Italie": no 5, Sonetto 104 del Petrarca by Franz Liszt
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1837-1849; Weimar, Germany 
Date of Recording: 04/1986 
Venue:  Live  Great Hall, Tchaikovsky Consv, Moscow 
Length: 5 Minutes 33 Secs. 
16.
Soirées de Vienne (9) after Schubert, S 427: no 6 by Franz Liszt
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1852; Weimar, Germany 
Date of Recording: 04/1986 
Venue:  Live  Great Hall, Tchaikovsky Consv, Moscow 
Length: 6 Minutes 33 Secs. 
17.
Mazurkas (5) for Piano, B 61/Op. 7: no 3 in F minor by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1831; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 04/1986 
Venue:  Live  Great Hall, Tchaikovsky Consv, Moscow 
Length: 2 Minutes 15 Secs. 
18.
Mazurkas (4) for Piano, B 105/Op. 30: no 4 in C sharp minor by Frédéric Chopin
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1836-1837; Paris, France 
Date of Recording: 04/1986 
Venue:  Live  Great Hall, Tchaikovsky Consv, Moscow 
Length: 3 Minutes 33 Secs. 
19.
Kinderszenen, Op. 15: no 7, Träumerei by Robert Schumann
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1838; Germany 
Date of Recording: 04/1986 
Venue:  Live  Great Hall, Tchaikovsky Consv, Moscow 
Length: 2 Minutes 24 Secs. 
20.
Characteristic Pieces (8), Op. 36: no 6, Etincelles by Moritz Moszkowski
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: Germany 
Date of Recording: 04/1986 
Venue:  Live  Great Hall, Tchaikovsky Consv, Moscow 
Length: 2 Minutes 38 Secs. 
21.
Lachtäubchen (Behr) "Polka de W.R." by Sergei Rachmaninov
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1911 
Date of Recording: 04/1986 
Venue:  Live  Great Hall, Tchaikovsky Consv, Moscow 
Length: 4 Minutes 4 Secs. 
22.
Sonata for Piano no 3 in B flat major, K 281 (189f) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1775; Munich, Germany 
23.
Adagio for Piano in B minor, K 540 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1788; Vienna, Austria 
24.
Rondo for Piano no 1 in D major, K 485 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Vienna, Austria 
25.
Moments musicaux (6) for Piano, D 780/Op. 94: no 3 in F minor by Franz Schubert
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1823-1828; Vienna, Austria 
26.
Schwanengesang (Schubert), S 560: no 7, Ständchen "Leise flehen" by Franz Liszt
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1838-1839; Geneva, Switzerland 
27.
Soirées de Vienne (9) after Schubert, S 427: no 7 by Franz Liszt
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1852; Weimar, Germany 
28.
Soirées de Vienne (9) after Schubert, S 427: no 8 by Franz Liszt
Performer:  Vladimir Horowitz (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1852; Weimar, Germany 

Customer Reviews

Average Customer Review:  1 Customer Review )
 A Horowitz Triple Whammy April 29, 2014 By T. Drake (South Euclid, OH) See All My Reviews "This box includes three Vladimir Horowitz recordings – made between 1985 and 1989. They represent a different pianist than the one who mesmerized, and occasionally pulverized, audiences in the 1940s. Gone are the leonine fortissimos and occasional hysteria of that era, and many of the rhythmic eccentricities of the 1970s, distilled to the bare essentials and replaced with a new simplicity. Studio recordings - 1985 As someone who heard Horowitz in recital (Boston, October 19, 1986, a day I will never forget) I can report that this CD comes closer than anything else I have heard to the real thing. This is a demonstration quality disc for piano fans. Schumann's Kreisleriana was a Horowitz specialty. The interpretation here is freer, looser structurally than his famed 1969 recording. For me, the earlier version is still unmatched in its concentration and the laying bare of Schumann's duality – in my opinion it remains Horowitz's finest solo recording. But this 1985 version also has a lot going for it – the tempos are so flexible, without losing the basic meter; and the phrasing is just so "right" – especially in the lyrical sections. Thus is it with the rest of the recording. This is some of Horowitz's most romantic Scarlatti playing, almost as if Scarlatti were a baroque Chopin – not as outlandish as it seems, as Chopin adored Scarlatti's music. The Liszt Valse Oublieé was another Horowitz specialty, he recorded it at least six times officially - this one is my favorite. Horowitz captures Liszt's mystical eroticism in a way few others have matched. The Impromptu from 1872 is rarely played, and hearing it one understands the comment that Horowitz can get forty colors from a piano by striking two keys. Horowitz plays Scriabin’s D-sharp minor Etude differently here than in earlier recordings, beginning quietly and building to a stunning climax. The Schubert Impromptu is played with more flexibility than we would here from such modern interpreters as Brendel. But past Schubert specialists like Schnabel didn't feel the need to be human metronomes to reveal the structure of the piece. Horowitz imbues the piece with that long lost quality known as charm, and the running scale passages before the coda are as well balanced as a string of pearls. The Military March is rather like Horowitz's arrangement of Stars and Stripes, but at somewhat lower voltage. Still, it is a dazzling delight, and a rousing conclusion to a marvelous recording. Moscow Vladimir Horowitz's April 20, 1986 Moscow recital has become so legendary that further comment seems superfluous. To say that this concert was an emotional experience is understatement. A lesser pianist might have wilted under the pressure, and many expected Horowitz would cancel. (He nearly did, after learning Vladimir Feltsman's piano had been vandalized following a concert at the American embassy. It took a phone call from President Reagan to persuade him to continue with the trip.) At 82, Horowitz seems ecstatically inspired here. He is in finer form than he was in his 1985 recitals, where he occasionally sounded rusty. In the more bravura pieces, he uses a full dynamic range, which he mostly avoided in later years. Some of the performances, particularly the Liszt Sonetto, recall the fiery Horowitz of the 1940s. Yet, there is a balance and inner warmth that was largely missing in his earlier years. Certainly, the young Horowitz would not have delivered the sprightly, bouncy Scarlatti Sonata (superior to performances from 1951 and 1968), or the charming Mozart Sonata (far preferable to the drab version taped in his living room one year earlier). But it's with the Russian repertoire that Horowitz hits his stride, from Rachmaninoff's sunny G major Prelude to Scriabin's stormy D-sharp minor Etude – where the bass notes ring as resoundingly as the bells of the Kremlin. The Chopin Mazurkas are offered with the bewitching melancholy that caused a German critic to rave over Horowitz ("Piano Culture Reawakened", read the 1926 headline). If the sparks of Moszkowski's Etincelles don't flicker as incandescently as they did in earlier days, Schumann's Traumerei sings with a new and heartfelt simplicity. For the record, not all of the performances on this CD come from the actual recital. The Scarlatti Sonata, first movement from the Mozart Sonata, Rachmaninoff G major Prelude and Polka, and Schubert-Liszt Soirées de Vienne came from the public rehearsal two days before the concert. However, no inter-splicing was done within movements, so this is really how Horowitz played at that time. The sound is excellent, if a bit close. The audience, made up mostly of Soviet bureaucrats, is rather noisy. At Home Horowitz’s final recording for DG was entitled “At Home”, which is not entirely accurate as two selections – the Schubert/Liszt Standchen and Soirees de Vienne No. 6 - were actually recorded at RCA’s Studio A in 1986 (they were for a projected Studio Recordings 1986 CD that was shelved after Horowitz rejected a fussy, disjointed rendition of Schubert’s B-flat sonata – ironically issued posthumously in 1991). The remaining items were recorded in the living room of Horowitz’s New York townhouse in December 1988-January 1989. This recording is an excellent example of Horowitz's late period. The Mozart selections recall the fabled clarity of his Scarlatti playing. Horowitz, 85 at the time of this recording, may not thunder as powerfully as he did during his youth, but he is as in command of his fingers than ever. Although Horowitz has been referred to as a Romantic pianist, his performance of Mozart's Adagio in B Minor is classical in its simplicity. The Schubert/Liszt Standchen is one of the greatest piano recordings ever made. Horowitz's control of dynamics and shading make it sound as if the piece was being played on three pianos at once. The two Soirees de Vienne are a virtuosic delight, and the perfect conclusion to a wonderful recording." Report Abuse
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