WGBH Radio WGBH Radio theclassicalstation.org

Bach: Sonatas And Partitas For Violin Solo / Kremer


Release Date: 10/11/2005 
Label:  Ecm   Catalog #: 000506502   Spars Code: n/a 
Composer:  Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gidon Kremer
Number of Discs: 2 
Recorded in: Stereo 
Length: 2 Hours 11 Mins. 

In Stock: Usually ships in 24 hours.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews





Gidon Kremer?s new readings of Bach?s solo sonatas and partitas on ECM may be as individual as Kremer himself, yet they?re neither ultra-modern in conception nor pedantically authentic. He points the First Sonata?s Adagio with strong accents, which, combined with virtuosic fluency, generate a constant flow of pulsed electricity. The Fuga, with so many of its chords taken simultaneously, may occasionally crunch, but Kremer?s consistent voice leading makes those odd moments of timbral roughness seem irrelevant or, at least, insignificant. He strongly characterizes the Andante?s dialogue, sharply etching the gestures. And he Read more devotes special attention to grouping the Presto?s phrases, highlighting their chameleon-like rhythmic transformations. Throughout the First Sonata, he distances it as much from the romantic as from the personal. Still, it?s no contradiction to consider his set individual, for while familiarity with, and study of, Bach has set his performances apart, his insights in total reveal objective universal, or structural, elements rather than quirky responses to them. Even the occasional suggestion that he?s pushed tempos beyond the point at which even he can prudently manage them (as in the perpetual-motion-like double of the First Partita?s Courante) only contributes to the sense of excitement. And his slashing abandon and intellectual concentration sometimes form a powerful compound, as when he conscientiously parses the phrases of the Second Partita?s Allemanda with slight pauses in the middle of measures?a practice recommended, of course, by the penetrating Carl Flesch?and follows in the succeeding movements with sharply articulated rhythmic verve. That verve carries through the Chaconne, in a performance of daunting intensity. He reserves perhaps the most aggressive gestures, however, for the Third Sonata (way back in 4:6, Edward Strickland called Kremer?s approach to several of Bach?s Partitas ?a second cousin to Russian Romanticism? and noted ?the enthusiasm of Kremer as he bites into the double stops with almost demonic vehemence?). Whatever has changed as Kremer has matured and adapted ideas from the period-performance movement, that youthful brashness has remained, as fresh and appealing as ever. These aren?t Kremer?s first recordings of the repertoire: a set of the partitas appeared in 1975, followed by both the sonatas and partitas on Philips in 1980?in addition to a stray performance of the First Partita in 1972 and one of the Chaconne in 1994. But Kremer?s second complete run-through resembles Milstein?s corresponding one in its unique fusion of artist and music?within, of course, the bounds of universality mentioned above. Both artists impart to the works an Olympian authority; the blueprint of a movement appears in the first few notes and subsequent passages build relentlessly (allowing, of course, for abundant fancy in the construction). In this sense, Kremer?s version seems to be the heir of Milstein?s. Milstein?s first set, from the 1950s, nevertheless retains a vibrant appeal on account of both its energy and its freedom from mannerisms, no matter how judicious; and that first set may therefore approach, or even exceed, the later one in the estimation of some listeners. Kremer?s second set, while sharing the virtues, if not the style or characteristics, of Milstein?s second set, also poses a similar problem: will time dull its luster for those who prefer a simpler, more classical approach (like, for example, Grumiaux?s)? Just now, with Kremer?s performances still reverberating, it?s hard to imagine how such profound probing of the music?s core could ever go unheeded, even if individuality (very) occasionally intrudes. The engineers have captured Kremer in a warm resonance that expands his subtle?and occasionally not so subtle?dynamic contrasts to dimensions almost larger than life. The set, on the whole, should appeal not only to collectors but also to those who seek a first acquaintance with the music; but this appeal doesn?t depend on the listener?s having absorbed musical messages stated more directly in other performances. Urgently recommended, finally, as one of the most thrillingly authoritative, if individual, recordings made on the violin.


FANFARE: Robert Maxham
Read less

Works on This Recording

1.
Sonata for Violin solo no 1 in G minor, BWV 1001 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gidon Kremer (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 03/2002 
Venue:  Riga Recording Studio, Riga, Latvia 
Length: 15 Minutes 28 Secs. 
2.
Partita for Violin solo no 1 in B minor, BWV 1002 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gidon Kremer (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/2001 
Venue:  Lockenhaus, St. Nikolaus Church 
Length: 23 Minutes 49 Secs. 
3.
Sonata for Violin solo no 2 in A minor, BWV 1003 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gidon Kremer (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 03/2002 
Venue:  Riga Recording Studio, Riga, Latvia 
Length: 23 Minutes 11 Secs. 
4.
Sonata for Violin solo no 3 in C major, BWV 1005 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gidon Kremer (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 03/2002 
Venue:  Riga Recording Studio, Riga, Latvia 
Length: 17 Minutes 8 Secs. 
5.
Partita for Violin solo no 2 in D minor, BWV 1004 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gidon Kremer (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/2001 
Venue:  Lockenhaus, St. Nikolaus Church 
Length: 28 Minutes 19 Secs. 
6.
Partita for Violin solo no 3 in E major, BWV 1006 by Johann Sebastian Bach
Performer:  Gidon Kremer (Violin)
Period: Baroque 
Written: 1720; Cöthen, Germany 
Date of Recording: 09/2001 
Venue:  Lockenhaus, St. Nikolaus Church 
Length: 26 Minutes 56 Secs. 

Sound Samples

Sonata for Violin Solo No.1 in G minor, BWV 1001: 1. Adagio
Sonata for Violin Solo No.1 in G minor, BWV 1001: 2. Fuga (Allegro)
Sonata for Violin Solo No.1 in G minor, BWV 1001: 3. Siciliana
Sonata for Violin Solo No.1 in G minor, BWV 1001: 4. Presto
Partita for Violin Solo No.1 in B minor, BWV 1002: 1a. Allemanda
Partita for Violin Solo No.1 in B minor, BWV 1002: 1b. Double
Partita for Violin Solo No.1 in B minor, BWV 1002: 2a. Corrente
Partita for Violin Solo No.1 in B minor, BWV 1002: 2b. Double
Partita for Violin Solo No.1 in B minor, BWV 1002: 3a. Sarabande
Partita for Violin Solo No.1 in B minor, BWV 1002: 3b. Double
Partita for Violin Solo No.1 in B minor, BWV 1002: 4a. Tempo di Borea
Partita for Violin Solo No.1 in B minor, BWV 1002: 4b. Double
Sonata for Violin Solo No.2 in A minor, BWV 1003: 1. Grave
Sonata for Violin Solo No.2 in A minor, BWV 1003: 2. Fuga
Sonata for Violin Solo No.2 in A minor, BWV 1003: 3. Andante
Sonata for Violin Solo No.2 in A minor, BWV 1003: 4. Allegro
Partita for Violin Solo No.2 in D minor, BWV 1004: 1. Allemande
Partita for Violin Solo No.2 in D minor, BWV 1004: 2. Corrente
Partita for Violin Solo No.2 in D minor, BWV 1004: 3. Sarabande
Partita for Violin Solo No.2 in D minor, BWV 1004: 4. Giga
Partita for Violin Solo No.2 in D minor, BWV 1004: 5. Ciaccona
Sonata for Violin Solo No.3 in C, BWV 1005: 1. Adagio
Sonata for Violin Solo No.3 in C, BWV 1005: 2. Fuga
Sonata for Violin Solo No.3 in C, BWV 1005: 3. Largo
Sonata for Violin Solo No.3 in C, BWV 1005: 4. Allegro assai
Partita for Violin Solo No.3 in E, BWV 1006: 1. Preludio
Partita for Violin Solo No.3 in E, BWV 1006: 2. Loure
Partita for Violin Solo No.3 in E, BWV 1006: 3. Gavotte en Rondeau
Partita for Violin Solo No.3 in E, BWV 1006: 4a. Minuet I
Partita for Violin Solo No.3 in E, BWV 1006: 4b. Minuet II
Partita for Violin Solo No.3 in E, BWV 1006: 5. Bourrée
Partita for Violin Solo No.3 in E, BWV 1006: 6. Gigue

Customer Reviews

Be the first to review this title
Review This Title
Review This Title Share on Facebook




YOU MUST BE A SUBSCRIBER TO LISTEN - TRY IT FREE!
Listen to all your favorite classical music for only $20/month.
Sign up for your monthly subscription service and get unlimited access to the most comprehensive digital catalog of classical music in the world - new releases. bestsellers, advanced releases and more.
Aleady a subscriber? Sign In