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Original Masters - Reginald Kell - American Decca Recordings


Release Date: 09/13/2005 
Label:  Deutsche Grammophon   Catalog #: 000480602   Spars Code: AAD 
Composer:  Wolfgang Amadeus MozartLudwig van BeethovenRobert SchumannJohannes Brahms,   ... 
Performer:  Reginald KellSheppard LehnhoffJoseph StepanskyGeorge Sopkin,   ... 
Conductor:  Reginald KellSalvador Camarata
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Zimbler SinfoniettaFine Arts String QuartetKell Chamber Players,   ... 
Number of Discs: 6 
Recorded in: Mono 
Length: 7 Hours 33 Mins. 

CD not available: This title is currently only available as an MP3 download.  

Notes and Editorial Reviews

All tracks have been digitally mastered using 24-bit technology.

R E V I E W S

When DGG and American Decca entered into a licensing agreement in 1950, Decca instantly became a major presence on the classical music scene. American record collectors were introduced to a host of major musicians whose recordings would not otherwise have made it to these shores until DGG began direct distribution here about a decade later—musicians such as Böhm, Fricsay, Jochum, Markevitch, Anda, Cherkassky, de Larrocha, Kempff, Walcha, Stader, Streich, and Fischer-Dieskau—and the German record company got an infusion of badly-needed dollars. Artistically it seemed like a one-way street, although Decca soon started its own
Read more classical recording program, finding such home-grown talent as Joseph and Lillian Fuchs, Ralph Kirkpatrick, rising superstar Leonard Bernstein (briefly but significantly—see James H. North’s review of DG’s issue of LB’s complete 1953 Decca recordings in Fanfare 28:6), and with perfect timing, signing a contract with a fresh arrival from England, clarinetist Reginald Kell. DG’s “Original Masters” series has been a boon to American collectors who never had adequate access to many early European LP issues. Who would have expected that 30 years after the LPs had last been in print, some imaginative executive at Universal would turn the tables and offer Americans and Europeans alike the opportunity to recapture such incredibly rich artifacts of our own musical past as these Bernstein and Kell boxes?

Reginald Kell (1906–1981) was the most famous, influential, and controversial clarinetist of his era, probably even of the 20th century up to his time. At the age of 26, he was invited by Sir Thomas Beecham to be the principal clarinetist of his new London Philharmonic Orchestra; by the time he came to America in 1949 he had already made an extensive series of recordings for HMV and English Columbia, including still-famous versions of the Brahms Quintet with the Busch Quartet and the Mozart Concerto with Malcolm Sargent and the London Symphony. Other items in his 78-rpm discography that are duplicated here include the Mozart Quintet, the Trios of Mozart, Beethoven, and Brahms, and the Schumann Fantasiestücke. 1(For those who are curious, almost all of this material is available in middling transfers on Testament CDs.) Perhaps the only significant work that he did not remake on these LPs was Schubert’s Der Hirt auf dem Felsen, which he had done on 78s both with Elisabeth Schumann and with Margaret Ritchie. His contract with Decca yielded 10 12-inch and four 10-inch LPs, recorded over a seven-year span beginning in mid 1950 (the Mozart Concerto and the Brahms Trio, originally issued on individual 10-inch discs, were later combined onto one 12-inch disc), and included virtually the entire basic solo and chamber repertoire of the clarinet at the time, along with quite a few lesser-known items. In this CD issue, which slightly anticipates Kell’s centennial (it was issued in late 2005), DG has been admirably conscientious, including every note on every one of the LPs. (Well, not exactly: the Debussy Rhapsodie appears on two of the LPs, and is not presented twice here.)

Kell was, as his compatriots would say, a one-off. It takes only a phrase or two to tell what was unique about his playing. On the surface, two unorthodox characteristics stand out; some might call them mannerisms. One is his constant use of vibrato, a practice that still provokes violent arguments among clarinetists almost three-quarters of a century after Kell started using it. The other is his habit of rhythmically exaggerating a rapid run (for example, a scale or arpeggio in 16th notes or triplets) by playing the first few notes slowly and then building to a dramatic accelerando. The reactions to these aspects of his style, predictably, varied during his career. On the one hand, Furtwängler is said to have told him that he was the only clarinetist he had ever heard who played from the heart; on the other, Edward T. Cone, the late composer, pianist, and theorist who for many years was on the music faculty at Princeton, wrote in his Musical Form and Musical Performance, “Reginald Kell’s phrasing, which seemed so sensitive when one first bought his record of the Mozart Clarinet Concerto, may have come to sound impossibly mannered!” Today, now that definite “schools” of clarinet-playing have developed in the UK and the US, I think one’s reaction to Kell depends a great deal on one’s training and surroundings.

Kell often said that he was inspired to change his playing style by hearing some of his LPO colleagues (oboist Leon Goossens in particular) and the singers they accompanied at Covent Garden; I have also heard the story that he developed his vibrato so that listeners to the “wireless” could tune in and identify his playing instantly!

I must confess that, when I began the project of listening to this set, that vibrato and that rhythmic mannerism very much colored my hearing and my thinking. But listening to all seven-and-a-half hours of Kell’s playing at its best—and most of these recordings indeed find him in his prime—I found myself repeatedly jotting down unexpected notes for this review. Early on, I did scribble something about the “rhythmic problem”; but then there is comment after comment about a fluid, unerring technique; about superb breath control; about dead-on intonation; and, about a sensitive feel for ensemble. The infamous vibrato takes some adjusting to, but after a while, one begins to notice that beneath it all is a well-centered, firm clarinet sound. Interestingly, the mannerisms come to the fore when Kell is playing as a true soloist, as in the Mozart Concerto; but, in the Brahms Quintet, he is acutely sensitive to the distinction between carrying the musical argument and serving in an accompanying role. When in the latter, he blends with the quartet tonally and dynamically as well as just about anyone I’ve heard.

It is neither necessary nor practical to discuss all the performances in this set here; I will try to address the high points and the few problematic ones. The Mozart Concerto, the earliest of these recordings (May 1950), is rather less mannered than the 1940 version with Sargent; Kell definitely sounds like Kell here, which takes some getting used to, but the technique and intonation are impeccable. The Zimbler Sinfonietta was a chamber ensemble composed of Boston Symphony members and organized by cellist Josef Zimbler; they played without conductor. The two Quintets with the Chicago-based Fine Arts Quartet, both from 1951, feature some first-rate ensemble-playing, as do the three Trios, all from 1950. Kell did not play in the two Mozart Serenades, but rather conducted a group of NBC Symphony players. It’s an odd combination, given the short musical leash on which Toscanini was known to keep his players, and Kell’s musical personality doesn’t really come through; these are decent, generic readings. The Brahms Sonatas (1953) are among the few letdowns in the set; pianist Rosen seems to have been a highly proficient accompanist, but this music requires a full-fledged partner, and Rosen is too reticent too much of the time. It’s unfortunate that DG couldn’t somehow include Kell’s 1950 versions of these pieces with Horszowski for Mercury, his first American recordings, which are much more dynamic and musically better-balanced.

A few other items deserve to be singled out: in the second movement of Weber’s Grand duo (1953), we hear the opera composer come to the fore; and here, perhaps more than anywhere else in the set, we can understand Kell’s remark about the influence of singers on his playing style. I doubt that anyone else would ever—could ever—play the opening theme with quite the inflection that Kell does. The Debussy Rhapsodie (1951) may be the finest performance in the entire set: the tempos are perfect, the breath control is almost inhuman, the phrasing is gorgeous, and the tone in the altissimo register is miraculously full and controlled, never thin or shrill. On the other hand, Contrasts may be the least interesting performance, even though the participants handle its technical difficulties comfortably. One suspects Kell may have been constrained by his partners here; Rosen is again the pianist, and this is the only record on which Ritter appears. I should add that there is serious tape print-through in the opening measures that someone should have caught. The Stravinsky pieces are not played, as they usually are, for flashy display, but as conversation pieces; Kell sounds “at home” as few others do in this enigmatic music. Finally, irrespective of all this serious repertoire, you’re likely to drive yourself crazy humming Benjamin’s Jamaican Rumba for days. For the record, Kell took all repeats except sonata expositions; and, needless to say, his Mozart is not for the HIP purist.

The last recordings in this set were taped in May 1957. Among these is the Saint-Saëns Sonata, and it is in this musically slight but deceptively difficult work of the composer’s final year that Kell’s playing shows signs of strain for the first time. The following year he remade the Mozart and Brahms Quintets with the Fine Arts Quartet in stereo for Concert-Disc, and while I no longer own these recordings, I remember that the deterioration in his playing was striking. He retired from performing soon thereafter, still only in his early fifties.

The production of this set deserves comment: from the assembly of the material to the re-mastering of the tapes to the documentation of the recording dates and personnel, this is a first-rate job, especially at a price below $8/disc. The sound is crystal-clear, honest mono; some low-frequency tape noise and abrupt fade-ins and fade-outs are intrinsic to the master tapes, as I could hear them on my copies of the LPs as well as the CDs. The individual discs are in paper sleeves, in this series’ standard hinged box, which is about 3/4 of an inch thick. The booklet includes replicas of several of the original album covers, candid photos of Kell, and reproductions of four of his “musical sketches,” which really need an LP-sized booklet to do them justice. Norman C. Nelson’s notes are crammed full of information about Kell’s career in general and these recordings in particular, and include a couple of choice quotes from Kell himself. I actually found myself wishing the essay were longer!

Finally, I think the documentation warrants a bit more discussion. Far too many historical reissues lack so much vital information; by contrast, this booklet includes seven pages of listings of contents, personnel, recording dates and locations, and original issue numbers. DG has even been so conscientious as to dig up some information that was lacking on the LPs, and to correct a couple of errors: for example, Kreisler’s Rondino was one of his notorious fakes; on the LP it was listed as a Rondino by Beethoven! Benjamin’s Rumba really has no “h” (here or in the New Grove), even though the LP listed it as Rhumba. And it is interesting to discover that all the “light music” items with Camarata—two 10-inch LPs—were recorded in a single day: Nelson provides a quote from Kell revealing that he had not seen the Mourant pieces until the day of the sessions!

DG’s conscientiousness has thus answered many questions. It has also perpetuated one mystery and one error, and perpetrated yet a new mystery. First, the members of the Zimbler Sinfonietta are dutifully listed as they were on the LP; but only the regular, “core” members’ names appear. Surely there was more than a sole double bass used in the recording. And the identities of the wind-players remain unknown; they were probably also BSO members. Second, through a typo on the LP cover, the hornists in the Mozart Serenades were listed as “Harry Bery” and “Arthur Bery,” and this is the way they are listed here. I am delighted to correct this error, which has lasted more than a half-century: actually, they were the brothers Harry and Arthur Berv, both of whom (along with a third brother, Jack) were in the horn section of Toscanini’s NBC Symphony; Arthur Berv had also been principal horn of the Philadelphia Orchestra in the 1930s. And last, the booklet lists Reginald Kell as the transcriber of the Handel and Corelli items; on the original LP, “Clarinet Encores,” the transcriptions were credited to Frederick Kell, the clarinetist’s father, who was also a musician. I can’t think of a reason Kell would have listed his father as having done the transcriptions if he himself had done them, unless he was trying to escape paying taxes on the royalties. If any reader can solve this one, please let me know.

This set comprehensively documents the artistry of a musician the likes of whom we will not encounter again. I can’t imagine being without it. I will say this to any clarinet students contemplating buying it, though: Kell was a trained professional. Do not try this at home.

FANFARE: Richard A. Kaplan
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Works on This Recording

1.
Concerto for Clarinet in A major, K 622 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Zimbler Sinfonietta
Period: Classical 
Written: 1791; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 05/1950 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 28 Minutes 49 Secs. 
Notes: This selection is a stereo recording. 
2.
Quintet for Clarinet and Strings in A major, K 581 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Sheppard Lehnhoff (Viola), Joseph Stepansky (Violin), George Sopkin (Cello),
Leonard Sorkin (Violin), Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Fine Arts String Quartet
Period: Classical 
Written: 1789; Vienna, Austria 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 30 Minutes 22 Secs. 
Notes: New York (03/28/1951 - 03/29/1951) 
3.
Serenade for Winds no 12 in C minor, K 388 (384a) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor:  Reginald Kell
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Kell Chamber Players
Period: Classical 
Written: 1782; Vienna, Austria 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 19 Minutes 29 Secs. 
Notes: New York (05/09/1951 - 05/11/1951) 
4.
Serenade for Winds no 11 in E flat major, K 375 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Conductor:  Reginald Kell
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Kell Chamber Players
Period: Classical 
Written: 1781; Vienna, Austria 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 23 Minutes 43 Secs. 
Notes: New York (05/09/1951 - 05/11/1951) 
5.
Trio for Piano, Clarinet/Violin and Cello no 4 in B flat major, Op. 11 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Performer:  Frank Miller (Cello), Mieczyslaw Horszowski (Piano), Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1797; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 07/1950 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 18 Minutes 35 Secs. 
6.
Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano in E flat major, K 498 "Kegelstatt" by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performer:  Lillian Fuchs (Viola), Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Mieczyslaw Horszowski (Piano)
Period: Classical 
Written: 1786; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 07/1950 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 20 Minutes 34 Secs. 
7.
Phantasiestücke (3) for Clarinet and Piano, Op. 73 by Robert Schumann
Performer:  Joel Rosen (Piano), Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1849; Germany 
Date of Recording: 06/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 10 Minutes 23 Secs. 
8.
Quintet for Clarinet and Strings in B minor, Op. 115 by Johannes Brahms
Performer:  Leonard Sorkin (Violin), Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Joseph Stepansky (Violin),
Sheppard Lehnhoff (Viola), George Sopkin (Cello)
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Fine Arts String Quartet
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1891; Austria 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 35 Minutes 37 Secs. 
Notes: New York (10/02/1951 - 10/05/1951) 
9.
Trio for Clarinet, Cello and Piano in A minor, Op. 114 by Johannes Brahms
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Mieczyslaw Horszowski (Piano), Frank Miller (Cello)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1891; Austria 
Date of Recording: 07/1950 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 23 Minutes 52 Secs. 
10.
Sonata for Clarinet/Viola and Piano no 1 in F minor, Op. 120 no 1 by Johannes Brahms
Performer:  Joel Rosen (Piano), Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1894; Germany 
Date of Recording: 06/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 20 Minutes 57 Secs. 
11.
Sonata for Clarinet/Viola and Piano no 2 in E flat major, Op. 120 no 2 by Johannes Brahms
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Joel Rosen (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1894; Germany 
Date of Recording: 06/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 20 Minutes 7 Secs. 
12.
Sonata for Clarinet and Piano in E flat major, Op. 167 by Camille Saint-Saëns
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Brooks Smith (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1921; France 
Date of Recording: 05/27/1957 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 18 Minutes 41 Secs. 
13.
Première Rhapsodie for Clarinet and Piano by Claude Debussy
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Joel Rosen (Piano)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1909-1910; France 
Date of Recording: 09/12/1951 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 8 Minutes 7 Secs. 
14.
Sonata for Clarinet and Piano in B flat major by Paul Hindemith
Performer:  Joel Rosen (Piano), Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1939; Switzerland 
Date of Recording: 09/12/1951 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 16 Minutes 30 Secs. 
15.
Pieces (3) for Clarinet solo by Igor Stravinsky
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1919; Switzerland 
Date of Recording: 09/12/1951 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 6 Minutes 32 Secs. 
16.
Contrasts for Violin, Clarinet and Piano, Sz 111 by Béla Bartók
Performer:  Joel Rosen (Piano), Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Melvin Ritter (Violin)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1938; Budapest, Hungary 
Date of Recording: 04/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 17 Minutes 44 Secs. 
17.
Pied Piper by Walter Mourant
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Conductor:  Salvador Camarata
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camarata & His Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Date of Recording: 02/17/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 4 Minutes 0 Secs. 
18.
Le voyageur sans bagages: Suite for Violin, Clarinet and Piano, Op. 157b by Darius Milhaud
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Joel Rosen (Piano), Melvin Ritter (Violin)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1936; France 
Date of Recording: 04/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 10 Minutes 51 Secs. 
19.
Studies (6) in English Folksong by Ralph Vaughan Williams
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Brooks Smith (Piano)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1927; England 
Date of Recording: 05/27/1957 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 9 Minutes 10 Secs. 
20.
Sonata for Recorder and Basso Continuo in F major, HWV 369/Op. 1 no 11: 3rd movement, Siciliana by George Frideric Handel
Performer:  Brooks Smith (Piano), Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Period: Baroque 
Written: London, England 
Date of Recording: 03/29/1957 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 3 Minutes 49 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Reginald Kell.
Composition written: London, England (Circa 1726 - Circa 1732). 
21.
Sonata for Violin and Basso Continuo in F major, HWV 370/Op. 1 no 12: 2nd movement, Adagio by George Frideric Handel
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Brooks Smith (Piano)
Period: Baroque 
Written: circa 1726-1732; London, England 
Date of Recording: 03/29/1957 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 3 Minutes 36 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Reginald Kell. 
22.
Pocket Size Sonata by Alec Templeton
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Brooks Smith (Piano)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: by 1949 
Date of Recording: 05/27/1957 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 7 Minutes 36 Secs. 
23.
Sonatina for Clarinet and Piano by Antoni Szalowski
Performer:  Brooks Smith (Piano), Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1936; Paris, France 
Date of Recording: 05/27/1957 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 10 Minutes 34 Secs. 
24.
La plus que lente by Claude Debussy
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Conductor:  Salvador Camarata
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camarata & His Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1910; France 
Date of Recording: 02/17/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 2 Minutes 42 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Reginald Kell. 
25.
Préludes, Book 1: no 8, La fille aux cheveux de lin by Claude Debussy
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Conductor:  Salvador Camarata
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camarata & His Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1909-1910; France 
Date of Recording: 02/17/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 2 Minutes 29 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Reginald Kell. 
26.
Poèmes (7) de Banville: no 1, Rêverie by Claude Debussy
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Conductor:  Salvador Camarata
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camarata & His Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1880; France 
Date of Recording: 02/17/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 2 Minutes 45 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Reginald Kell. 
27.
Children's Corner: The Little Shepherd by Claude Debussy
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Conductor:  Salvador Camarata
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camarata & His Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1906-1908; France 
Date of Recording: 02/17/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 2 Minutes 22 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Reginald Kell. 
28.
Ecstasy by Walter Mourant
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Conductor:  Salvador Camarata
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camarata & His Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Date of Recording: 02/17/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 4 Minutes 5 Secs. 
29.
Blue Haze by Walter Mourant
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Conductor:  Salvador Camarata
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camarata & His Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Date of Recording: 02/17/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 3 Minutes 22 Secs. 
30.
Dance of the Three Old Maids by Reginald Porter-Brown
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Conductor:  Salvador Camarata
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camarata & His Orchestra
Period: 20th Century 
Date of Recording: 02/17/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 2 Minutes 54 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Salvador Camarata. 
31.
Sonata for Oboe and Basso Continuo in F major, HWV 363a/Op. 1 no 5 - 2nd movement, Allegro by George Frideric Handel
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Brooks Smith (Piano)
Date of Recording: 03/29/1957 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 2 Minutes 44 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Reginald Kell.
Composition written: London, England (Circa 1726 - Circa 1732). 
32.
Sonatas (12) for Violin and Basso Continuo, Op. 5: no 9 in A major - Gigue by Arcangelo Corelli
Performer:  Brooks Smith (Piano), Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Date of Recording: 03/29/1957 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 3 Minutes 6 Secs. 
Notes: Arrangers: Reginald Kell; John Walsh. 
33.
Rondino on a theme by Beethoven by Fritz Kreisler
Performer:  Brooks Smith (Piano), Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Period: Romantic 
Written: Austria 
Date of Recording: 03/29/1957 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 3 Minutes 21 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Reginald Kell. 
34.
Pièce en forme de Habañera by Maurice Ravel
Performer:  Brooks Smith (Piano), Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1907; France 
Date of Recording: 03/29/1957 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 3 Minutes 21 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Reginald Kell. 
35.
Petite pièce for Clarinet and Piano by Claude Debussy
Performer:  Brooks Smith (Piano), Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1910; France 
Date of Recording: 03/29/1957 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 2 Minutes 11 Secs. 
36.
Roundelay for Clarinet by Alan Richardson
Performer:  Brooks Smith (Piano), Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: England 
Date of Recording: 03/29/1957 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 3 Minutes 41 Secs. 
37.
Jocelyn, Op. 100: Ah! ne t'éveille pas encor "Berceuse" by Benjamin Godard
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Brooks Smith (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1888; France 
Date of Recording: 03/29/1957 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 5 Minutes 23 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Reginald Kell. 
38.
Jamaican Rumba by Arthur Benjamin
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Brooks Smith (Piano)
Period: 20th Century 
Written: 1938; England 
Date of Recording: 03/29/1957 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 2 Minutes 42 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Reginald Kell. 
39.
Caprice viennois, Op. 2 by Fritz Kreisler
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Conductor:  Salvador Camarata
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camarata & His Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: Austria 
Date of Recording: 02/17/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 4 Minutes 5 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Salvador Camarata. 
40.
Liebesleid by Fritz Kreisler
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Conductor:  Salvador Camarata
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camarata & His Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: Austria 
Date of Recording: 02/17/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 3 Minutes 46 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Salvador Camarata. 
41.
Transcription of Kreisler's "Liebesfreud" for piano by Sergei Rachmaninov
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Conductor:  Salvador Camarata
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camarata & His Orchestra
Period: Post-Romantic 
Written: 1921; Austria 
Date of Recording: 02/17/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 3 Minutes 29 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Salvador Camarata. 
42.
The King steps out: Stars in my eyes by Fritz Kreisler
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Conductor:  Salvador Camarata
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camarata & His Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: by 1936; Vienna, Austria 
Date of Recording: 02/17/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 2 Minutes 43 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Salvador Camarata. 
43.
Schön Rosmarin by Fritz Kreisler
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet)
Conductor:  Salvador Camarata
Orchestra/Ensemble:  Camarata & His Orchestra
Period: Romantic 
Written: Austria 
Date of Recording: 02/17/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 2 Minutes 5 Secs. 
Notes: Arranger: Salvador Camarata. 
44.
Grand Duo concertante for Clarinet and Piano in E flat major, J 204/Op. 48 by Carl Maria von Weber
Performer:  Reginald Kell (Clarinet), Joel Rosen (Piano)
Period: Romantic 
Written: 1815-1816; Germany 
Date of Recording: 06/1953 
Venue:  New York 
Length: 18 Minutes 21 Secs. 

Sound Samples

Clarinet Concerto in A, K.622: 1. Allegro
Clarinet Concerto in A, K.622: 2. Adagio
Clarinet Concerto in A, K.622: 3. Rondo (Allegro)
Clarinet Quintet in A, K.581: 1. Allegro
Clarinet Quintet in A, K.581: 2. Larghetto
Clarinet Quintet in A, K.581: 3. Menuetto
Clarinet Quintet in A, K.581: 4. Allegretto con variazioni
Serenade in C minor, K.388 "Nacht Musik": 1. Allegro
Serenade in C minor, K.388 "Nacht Musik": 2. Andante
Serenade in C minor, K.388 "Nacht Musik": 3. Menuetto in canone
Serenade in C minor, K.388 "Nacht Musik": 4. Allegro
Serenade in E flat, K.375: 1. Allegro maestoso
Serenade in E flat, K.375: 2. Menuetto
Serenade in E flat, K.375: 3. Adagio
Serenade in E flat, K.375: 4. Menuetto
Serenade in E flat, K.375: 5. Finale (Allegro)
Piano Trio No.4 in B flat, for Clarinet, Piano and Cello, Op. 11 "Gassenhauer-Trio": 1. Allegro con brio
Piano Trio No.4 in B flat, for Clarinet, Piano and Cello, Op. 11 "Gassenhauer-Trio": 2. Adagio
Piano Trio No.4 in B flat, for Clarinet, Piano and Cello, Op. 11 "Gassenhauer-Trio": 3. Tema con Variazioni. Andante
Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano in E flat K.498 "Kegelstatt": 1. Andante
Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano in E flat K.498 "Kegelstatt": 2. Menuetto & Trio
Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano in E flat K.498 "Kegelstatt": 3. Rondeau (Allegretto)
Fantasiestücke, Op.73: 1. Zart und mit Ausdruck
Fantasiestücke, Op.73: 2. Lebhaft, leicht
Fantasiestücke, Op.73: 3. Rasch und mit Feuer

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